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Opinion

  • I may never understand what a bonfire, parade, football game and dance have to do with the word “homecoming,” but it seems to be something that’s become a tradition not only for Los Alamos High School, but schools across the country. 

    There are many aspects of homecoming that are open to the entire community, but since the homecoming dance is exclusive to the teen community, I’ll tackle that subject. More importantly, it’s a subject that makes students either scratch their heads or lose their temper for various reasons. One reason is the sound and music choice. Another reason is the theme and decorations each year. 

    This year, the official word is out that the dance will take place in the school’s lobby, with a zombie apocalypse theme. This being reason enough for people to not even give homecoming a chance, is the part that I feel people need to man up on. 

  • Over the past year, the Los Alamos Public Schools conducted an extensive community listening process in an effort to develop a strategic plan to raise the quality of our schools to an even higher level of achievement.  Repeatedly, we asked the questions of “What do we do well?” and “What can we do better?” I feel we have heard your voices, and in the process, learned a great deal about the things our community values about education.  From information gathered, the school district will lay out a five-year strategic plan to move the district forward on a journey to excellence.

  • This intangible thing we call freedom is interpreted differently by just about every individual, but one aspect that’s not open for debate is that we enjoy freedom because of the sacrifices made by countless men and women of our armed forces. 

    We must never question that freedom is worth fighting for, and dying for. That very concept was the genesis of the United States of America.

  • How did Mother’s Day begin? Well you would be forgiven for thinking it was a business ploy to sell off all the cute fluffy toys that didn’t get sold on Valentines and Easter.

  • Redevelopment of the “Trinity Site” into a shopping center has been pursued since 2005.  

    Times, circumstances, and the proposed development have all changed since then.  

    It is time to abandon this approach. 

  • Happy New Year. Let’s see how the crystal ball looks this year. 

    HMMM … it looks clearer. Maybe that is because we’ve had a year to get acquainted with the new state administration.

    Oh, I see Gov. Susana Martinez pushing her drivers license bill up another steep hill. Maybe she should wait until next year and hope she has a Republican legislature.

  • Another school semester came to a close. Students scurried about searching for ways to improve their grades at the last minute.  

    Teachers found themselves staring at piles of papers to review, a mountain of tests to grade, endless emails from concerned parents, and a finals schedule conveniently permuted by inclement weather.  

  • The colder weather this time of year heralds the anticipation of things such as winter sports, planning for family get-togethers, kids counting the days to winter break and maybe stocking up on hot tea and honey for that inevitable, annoying sore throat. 

    As we enter this season it might be a good idea to have a clearer understanding of what a sore throat, or pharyngitis, actually is and when to be concerned enough to call for an appointment or just treat the symptoms at home.

  • Republicans and the Hollywood crowd seldom seem to be a very good match. 

    Good reasons exist for this standoff. With a few notable exceptions, Hollywood types are more liberal in their thinking than most Republicans, especially on social issues. 

  • Rumor has it that a jolly old elf is preparing to fly to town on his magical sleigh.
    The portly fellow with the infectious laugh and fluffy white beard will be at CB FOX from 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. on Saturday, Dec. 3 to meet with children of all ages.

    Send us your wags

    “Just a wag” features initial snippets of news heard around town.  
    The wags may grow to larger stories or simply remain snippets, either way this is meant to spark interest and provide food for thought.
    E-mail wags to lanews@lamonitor.com.

  • As you roll your 48-gallon trash roll cart down the driveway to deposit it at the curb, do you ever wonder why you are being charged the same fee per month as your neighbor who has a 96-gallon cart overflowing with trash?  
    There is another option, and it is known as a Pay-as-you-throw (PAYT) solid waste rate structure.  
    With a PAYT rate system residents are charged for trash services based on how much waste they put out every week for disposal.  
    By charging for trash services based on roll cart size, a more equitable rate structure is created.  Also, residents are given a financial incentive to reduce trash.  

  • The U.S. Postal Service study on closing some 3,700 post offices in the nation poses a real crisis for rural America.
    The problem is an $8 billion budget deficit. New Mexico has 54 of those target post offices. Hearings currently are being held to determine which offices should be cut.
    Rural post offices are more than just a place to pick up mail. They are locations to congregate and see your neighbors at the appointed time when the mail truck is scheduled to arrive.
    Driving to the nearest open post office can take hours and be impossible in the winter.
    The only thing worse is losing a school house. School closings began in New Mexico in the late 1940s.

  • In many cases, this newspaper will remain neutral regarding local option issues and elections opting instead to let citizens enliven the debate through guest editorials and letters to the editor.

    With regard to the leisure pool issue currently before voters in a mail-in ballot question, the Los Alamos Monitor is going to step from the gray of neutrality onto the black and white of this page.

    The leisure pool represents more than just a pool. The project is more than just a lazy man’s way to while away the hours on a hot summer afternoon, or a place for kids to become exorcised of way too much energy.

  • Local restaurant takes on partner
    We hear that Los Alamos resident Patrick Mockler has purchased 50 percent ownership in Central Avenue Grill.
    Mockler hopes to expand the restaurant to the rear to include a sports bar.

    Send us your wags

    “Just a wag” features initial snippets of news heard around town.  
    The wags may grow to larger stories or simply remain snippets, either way this is meant to spark interest and provide food for thought.
    E-mail wags to lanews@lamonitor.com.

  • Councilor gets married

    We have learned that County Councilor Mike Wismer married UNM-LA Campus Resources Director Lisa Clough in a small private ceremony with family members Sept. 9. The couple honeymooned in Alaska.

    Send us your wags

    “Just a wag” features initial snippets of news heard around town.  
    The wags may grow to larger stories or simply remain snippets, either way this is meant to spark interest and provide food for thought.
    E-mail wags to lanews@lamonitor.com.

  • White Rock is abuzz

    We hear that a certain local businessman and his partners are about to launch a co-work space venture in White Rock near Metzger’s.

    Send us your wags

    “Just a wag” features initial snippets of news heard around town.  The wags may grow to larger stories or simply remain snippets, either way this is meant to spark interest and provide food for thought.
    E-mail wags to lanews@lamonitor.com.

  • Smile for the camera

    Some angry parents are telling us that they are fed up with students smoking around Los Alamos High School, despite posted no smoking signs, and intend to snap photos of the smokers for Facebook.

    Send us your wags

    “Just a wag” features initial snippets of news heard around town.  The wags may grow to larger stories or simply remain snippets, either way this is meant to spark interest and provide food for thought.
    E-mail wags to lanews@lamonitor.com.

  •  

    As the seasonal fires die out, there is now time to ask: “Why?”  

    Why did another round of fires scar the southwest, causing untold loss and destruction of invaluable habitat?

    The answer is simple yet disturbing: our public lands have not been well managed.

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    Seven months after his nomination as Economic Development Secretary, four months after his boss and state lawmakers failed to make jobs a priority in the legislative session, and one month after the state posted the first pathetic job growth after 32 straight months of losses, Jon Barela is traveling the state to hold job creation meetings.

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    Anthony Mortillaro walked into the North Central Regional Transit district (“NCRTD”) May 8, 2011 and wheels started turning. Appointed Interim Executive Director after Josette Lucero retired from the NCRTD at the end of April; he immediately began to review policies and procedures and took time to visit with each member of the administrative staff.