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Opinion

  • The school board approved a measure that asks residents to back a bond resolution to help repair and rebuild our schools.

    This is a measure – and effort – that we should support.

    Our schools are old and in need of repair – and in some cases outright replacement. The board recognizes this fact and its members are taking the right steps to move us forward.

    Yes, this will be a tax increase; there is no way of getting around that. And yes, these are difficult times in Los Alamos right now.

  • A recent ruling by the Attorney General’s Office should be of concern to everyone.

    See, the office ruled that state law contains no recourse for people who ask to inspect state officials’ public e-mails and find they’ve been deleted.

    So if an official wants to hide something, just do it via the Internet than delete it.

    It is scary. Any document produced by a public figure doing the public’s business belongs to the public. To just hit the delete key to avoid disclosure is not acceptable.

  • We can understand the concern of the Bernalillo County Clerk that she would run out of ballots on election day.

    But please, how much is clearly too much?

    See, Bernalillo County shredded almost 1.4 million ballots – which cost taxpayers about $1.2 million – that were left over from Tuesday’s primary election.

    County Clerk Maggie Toulouse Oliver says her office wanted to avoid a debacle of not having enough ballots.

    Well and good, she should make sure she had enough. But how many voters does she think live in Bernalillo County?

  • Officials are boasting of a high primary election turnout. Statewide that translates to a whopping 28 percent.

    Yes, 28 percent of registered voters actually going and casting a vote is something to brag about.

    And this is of registered voters – many citizens don’t even bother to register.

    A total of 543,615 Democrats and 354,272 Republicans were registered to vote in Tuesday’s primary election. Of that, about 138,000 Democrats voted, while some 111,000 Republicans went to the polls.

  • First, Hill Restaurant was honored by the state’s restaurant association. That recognition is well deserved and appreciated by anyone who goes there to eat.

    The service is always pleasant and prompt.

    Now, the Hilltop House’s staff was recognized by the Best Western Corp. for having an employee who goes above and beyond.

    Again, anyone who has stopped by has always been greeted warmly – both in the hotel and the restaurant.

    These are just two examples of the outstanding businesses we have here.

  • While voting has been going on for some time, Tuesday is the big day when polling places will be open and tallies made.

    If you have not voted, be sure that you do so at your place of registration (see Sunday’s paper for a complete list.)

    Voting is one of the key elements of a democracy, be sure that you take part.

    Registered voters can begin casting ballots on primary election day from 7 a.m.-7 p.m.

    As a recap, here are the Monitor’s recommendations in this primary election; only commenting on contested races..

  • Monday is Memorial Day. It is so much more than a day off from work to picnic with the family and kick-off the summer season. It carries even greater meaning during a time of war like we are experiencing right now.

    Over the past months a sizable number of American soldiers have died in service to their country. Memorial Day is a special day set aside for all of us to remember and memorialize the soldiers of many generations who have given their lives so that we are free to enjoy our picnics and trips to the amusement parks.

    These men and women must be remembered.

  • Last week, the county council met to discuss plans and proposals for White Rock.

    While that community needs assistance, care must be taken on just what is spent there. If the county thinks that just building buildings will bring in business, it does not understand economics.

    However, there is a word for us all to consider here, and it could really be the key to the White Rock discussion.

    And that word is Bandelier.

  • What ever happened to the will of the people?

    When did that go away?

    Well, it seems to have for New Mexico’s Democratic leaders as more and more of the state’s Democratic superdelegates are announcing support for Barack Obama’s presidential bid.

    Last time we looked, Hillary Clinton won the vote in the primary held here. What happened to that? How can the vote of the people be ignored so easily?

  • The Monitor will continue its tradition of recommendations in election races, this year making some suggestions for the primary – in which early voting has already begun.

    The Monitor editorial board was not unanimous in its recommendations, and that will be noted when pertinent. And we will not comment on uncontested races.

  • The Monitor will continue its tradition of recommendations in election races, this year making some suggestions for the primary – in which early voting has already begun.

    The Monitor editorial board was not unanimous in its recommendations, and that will be noted when pertinent. And we will not comment on uncontested races.

    In the race for the U.S. House seat in the Third District, the board was divided between Don Wiviott and Harry Montoya in the Democratic primary.

  • The cleanup of the land in and around Los Alamos National Laboratory must not be something that eventually gets done.

    It must be a priority.

    And this must start with our delegation in Washington and with the Department of Energy.

    Because of funding issues there is a danger that the agreement between the state and the DOE on a timetable to do the cleanup will not be met. We have to agree with NMED Secretary Ron Curry that that is unacceptable.

  • The Associated Press recently released a report on campaign spending in the Third District.

    And the winner was Santa Fe developer Don Wiviott, who spent more than a  half-million dollars in three months on his quest for the 3rd District seat in Congress.

    And, according to a report filed Tuesday with the Federal Election Commission, he still had more than $400,000 in the bank as of the end of March.

  • How many of you have taken part in the county’s budget hearings?

    Not many, judging by the crowds. And to be honest, other than our reporter covering the event, not many at the paper have either.

    It is hard to sit through these long sessions, filled with numbers, projections and suppositions.

    But it has to be done and it is one of the many reasons that those who are willing to serve us deserve some credit.

  • Have you been to the Motor Vehicle Department lately? No?

    Neither has anybody else.

    When you go to the MVD, you don’t know whether the staff will have the answers to your assorted registration-related questions. You can’t say whether you’ll pass the vision test. As you set out on your journey to the department’s office on Central Avenue, you know only one thing for sure: You’ll have to wait your turn.

  • Well, the long, anticipated wait for the nation’s 47th state to reveal its quarter ended last week when – what was called Multicultural New Mexico – showcased its new  coin. And was it ever worth the wait.Here we have, after a contest, years of anticipation and hype a quarter with the outline of the state and the Zia symbol.Oh, you’re waiting for the other shoe?  There is not going to be one – that is it.

  • If you are a keen newspaper observer you may have noticed something a bit different about today’s Monitor: it is a little smaller.It is very appropriate that during the time of the Earth Day celebration, we have made a move to help save a small part of the environment.The Monitor – as of today – is being printed on 24-inch paper, a reduction of one inch in the width from our previous paper.This slight reduction will have a no impact on news, photos or other content, and a very minimal impact on advertising, as the difference will be a

  • One of the greatest frauds in recent history is the story we have been sold on term limits.We are told they are good for us, will clean up politics and government. We are told it will be good for democracy.Nothing is further from the truth. And this ignores the fact that we have always had limits on how long someone can serve – it is called an election.All term limits do is take good people, who have gained experience, knowledge and an understanding of the process and force them out.For what reason?

  • As the county gets ready to discuss its budget with the council – and us – there are some things that need understanding.

  • One of the easiest things to do is be a Monday morning quarterback.