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Opinion

  • Los Alamos is a wonderful place for most families. We enjoy great schools and a wide variety of youth/family programs. I am proud our town is a progressive, vibrant community that is generally responsive to the needs of its residents. But there is a gap not yet addressed. Our community has a small, yet significant, part of the population with developmental disabilities. Outside of school, the families who care for those individuals are often on their own. In Los Alamos, there is a lack of comprehensive programs in place to provide support across the spectrum of abilities.

  • Okay, so we are going to have higher property tax. That’s not surprising.

    Now, since this implies that Los Alamos needs more revenue, the Municipal Building selection group seems oblivious to what is going on around them in making some recent decisions.

  • Looking for new ideas about a next generation retail center?

    Face it, most of us don’t have the foggiest notion about what’s going on in the realm of post-meltdown shopping centers.

    Much less do we know what the odds are that anything is going to work for very long.

    Having been shopping-deprived for most of its existence has been at best a mixed blessing for Los Alamos, but one of the things it has not provided is a well-developed, experienced nose for how to create a vibrant retail environment for the future.

  • I share the disappointment of most that the route to the full development of the Trinity Site remains uncertain. Some blame Boyer, some the county and council, but all of us need to look a little deeper.

    There have been changes in Los Alamos over the past 15 years that have taken their toll. Better roads to Española and Santa Fe and inexpensive and regularly scheduled public transportation have made it faster and easier to shop outside Los Alamos.

  • I sometimes wonder if scientists have ever computed the density of stupid.

    Lead is fairly dense and yet it is only half as dense as the metal osmium. Platinum, gold and mercury are pretty dense also. Mercury is so dense that lead will float on it.

    But stupid has to be the densest element by far. It never ceases to amaze me how much stupid some people can stuff into such small heads.

    What brought on this rant? Well golly, it could be so many things.

  • As legislators prepare to face the $433 million monster in the closet, some folks have suggested a tax increase. They should take a lesson from New Mexico history.

  • I write my story about healthcare as a physical therapist, who retired after

    32 years in large institutions and private office. Healthcare is a subject close to my heart. My story is long and I ask for your patience to hear my voice.

    I am a graduate of the University of California Medical School. I started my practice first as a staff therapist in a large county hospital, followed by private hospitals and clinics, ending in private solo practice where I provided specialized physical therapy services primarily focusing on pain and stress management and education.

  • The Plastic Bag Free Los Alamos campaign began with Mrs. Michele Altherr’s  Kinnikinnick Club and an environmental group for elementary-age children who had decided that we wanted to do something big for the Earth.  

    Everyone voiced several ambitious ideas before Mrs. Altherr, the group leader, suggested stopping plastic bag use.  

    At the time none of us in the club had any idea how bad they were for the environment.

  • Recently I spent time at the Carson National Forest’s Valle Vidal unit. In addition to an interesting and progressive land management approach, it offered excellent access. I drove in on dirt roads to McCrystal campground, paid $5 a day, and camped 3 days while mountain bike exploring some of the area.

    Now I ask myself, since I live in Los Alamos, why is it that I almost never access the Valles Caldera?  

  • “Water, water everywhere, nor any drop to drink,” is a memorable and usually misquoted paradox from Coleridge’s “Rime of the Ancient Mariner.” It describes a ship stuck in the middle of the ocean, but it applies symbolically to many other situations.

    One of them is about work and unemployment.

  • “Water, water everywhere, nor any drop to drink,” is a memorable and usually misquoted paradox from Coleridge’s “Rime of the Ancient Mariner.” It describes a ship stuck in the middle of the ocean, but it applies symbolically to many other situations.

    One of them is about work and unemployment.

  • Sept. 2, 1752 was a Wednesday. Adding fourteen days (two weeks), can you figure out what day of the week Sept. 16, 1752 was?

    Halloween falls on a Saturday this year. July 4 next year will be on a Sunday.

    If you own a perpetual calendar, you can look these dates up.

    But without having a calendar handy, could you determine on what day of the week Valentines Day falls next year? Or Christmas? Your birthday? Uh, okay ... how about Easter Sunday?

  • KRSN has long been the voice of Los Alamos. It voices opinions, provides entertainment, brings us our football and basketball games, keeps the community in tune with itself, and most important it serves as a life line in times of emergency.

    For example, in the 50s, a little girl was lost in the woods after dark and patrols were everywhere looking for her. KRSN followed the search and when she was found, KRSN reported the good news and warned the community that the fire stations would sound their sirens to bring in all the patrols.

  • Over 200 bicycle riders registered for the 37th annual Tour de Los Alamos bicycle race on Sunday, July 12, 2009 in Los Alamos, with approximately half the participants competing in the citizens one-lap event (28 miles), and half the participants competing in the licensed two-lap (56 miles) or three-lap event (84 miles).  

    The youngest participant in the entire event, 14-year-old Gabriel Intrator from Los Alamos, was also the overall winner of the Citizen’s Race.

  • As citizens of our country, we have the right to complain about the things we do not like. We have the responsibility, however, to take positive action to improve what we feel is lacking. A basic problem of all government, identified by a Los Alamos citizen in 1959, is “the prevention of any one interest from gaining complete control at the expense of others.” The criticism was not about the presence of special interests, which can benefit society greatly, but about lack of control of those interests in government by government.

  •                                                          

    Picture every part of the environment having a string tied to it. The strings lead to concerns spaced in time and distance.

    At one end the strings all meet in a tangle of knots.

    That mighty tangle is world population.

  • It would be very entertaining to resurrect the Founding Fathers – the guys who fought to build a nation that would not suffer taxation without representation – and see the expressions on their faces when they see what that ideology has spawned.  Taxation “with” representation is our credo and we certainly do have representation.  Boy, do we have representation!  

     

    More so than most people realize.

     

  •  The authors of the “Think twice ….” op-ed (Monitor, July 16, 2009) were correct in stating that at the current human consumption rate today’s scale of renewable energy production is devastatingly bleak.

    Sharon Begley (Newsweek, March 23) summarized the outlook in scientific and engineering terms: “We cannot get there from here.”

  •  Each year, on Aug. 26, we celebrate Women’s Equality Day to pay tribute to those brave suffragists, like Elizabeth Cady Stanton, Alice Paul and Ida B. Wells Barnett, who led the struggle for American women to win the most critical tool of democracy ­­- the right to vote.

    Women today not only have the right to vote, but we’ve made significant advances in the world of work, in education, in business and in many other arenas.

    Still, Women’s Equality Day 2009 offers the chance for a temperature check.

  • The credit roll for a typical feature film is several hundred names long.

    Even a television documentary is often at least a hundred people or organizations. In fact the collaborative efforts and acts of generosity and kindness for a typical educational or cultural video can be so long that the credit roll, in order not to take up half the show, has to be accelerated to the point that thanks and credits whiz by in an unreadable blur.

    There is almost never a power point at the national laboratory that doesn’t include a dozen names and sponsors.