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Opinion

  • Dear Editor,

    Our national research laboratories - Los Alamos, Sandia and Lawrence Livermore - are national treasures. Their physical plants and assemblies of some of our most talented scientists, engineers and technicians cannot be duplicated anywhere in the world.

    Yes, their primary directive has been military research. But technology-sharing programs have enabled their discoveries to be developed commercially for peaceful purposes. And they have been soliciting more and more contracts for nonmilitary research.

  • As the county and the schools are more and more at odds over how the deal for Trinity Place reads, we are more and more concerned that it will never happen.

    Reports from every business corner that you want to go to say that vacancies in malls and shopping plazas are rising fast nationally. The reports note that the average vacancy rate at neighborhood and community malls rose to 8.2 percent, up from 7.3 percent in 2007.

    This is the highest level since 1995.

  • It was disheartening to hear that the school district feels that Los Alamos County is playing hard ball with our schools. Instead of reaching an agreement on the Trinity Site Project that will serve the schools, and thus the entire community, the county appears to have chosen to serve itself.

     

  • Like or dislike the federal sttimulas plan, it is reality.

    So here are some facts from Senators Jeff Bingaman and Tom Udall and you can be the judge which programs will create jobs.

    Here is list of the categories and levels of funding New Mexico stands to receive under the Senate’s version of the recovery package.      

    Infrastructure, Science

     • $19.7 million through the Drinking Water State Revolving Fund to address the backlog of drinking water infrastructure needs

  • Dear Editor,

    Today one of the most important problems of the financial system is undercapitalization of the banks.  That restricts their ability to loan money to business, particularly short-term loans, the loans that contribute greatly to the flow of money in the system. There is an idea for providing that capital and reaping the consequent benefits.

  • Dear Editor,

    The United States should reconsider its support of Israel in light of the ongoing Gaza Strip war between Israel and Hamas.  The disproportionate use of Israeli force against Hamas was made possible by the United States. Israel is the major recipient of military aid from the U.S.

    This support of Israel by the U.S. is criticized by Atalia Orner, a Jewish acadelnic at the University of Notre Dame. She says the result is that American occupation of Iraq is equated with the Israeli occupation of Palestinian territory.

  • Dear Editor,

    The Valles Caldera National Preserve is at a crossroads. Everyone involved with this 89,000 acre piece of public land now realizes that the legislation that set the Preserve up in 2000 is not working and will not work. The legislation needs to change and proposals will come forward soon to get this land opened and fully protected for all the American people who own it together.

  • Dear Editor,

  • As a cancer survivor, or as I prefer to say thriver, I often used to cringe when people would look at me and say, “Boy, you’re really brave to be going through all this.”

    I’d stand there, with no hair or a lop-sided wig, have dark circles under my eyes the size of plums, be feeling generally lousy and would look at them in astonishment.

    “How can I be brave when all I’m doing is what I have to do to stay alive? If I don’t do this I’ll die. That’s not bravery, that’s a no-brainer!”

  • There is an old idea being refloated recently that raises the idea of moving the responsibility of – at least parts of – the national laboratories to the Pentagon.

     

    As it was when this was talked about before, it is still a bad idea.

     

    We guess there is nothing wrong with the new Obama administration taking a look at the concept and in asking the Department of Defense and the Department of Energy to talk with stakeholders to see what this would entail.

     

  • Thursday is a very special day. It is a day that should be special to everyone, but it is of special note this year.

    Thursday is the 200th anniversary of the birth of our 16th president, Abraham Lincoln.

    To say he is one of our best presidents is an understatement. He and George Washington stand alone.

    The son of a Kentucky frontiersman, Lincoln had to struggle for a living and for learning.

    He was born Feb. 12, 1809, in Hardin County, Kentucky. His parents were both born in Virginia of undistinguished families.

    His mother died when he was 10.

  • Dear Editor,

    I very much appreciate Bernadette Lauritzen’s article “Women’s business group forms” in Sunday’s paper and simply wanted to make some clarifications if I may.

     Last year I coordinated several meetings with a small group of community-minded women. We had tons of ideas but couldn’t figure out what we could do to address our issues while still fitting into our daily lives.  I began to wonder if a networking group made any sense.  

  • Dear Editor,

    I have to assume that when writing her articles Geology Professor Peters has absolutely no vested research support or financial sponsorship from oil/gas/shale/tar-sand or other mining/extraction/manufacturing interests. If she does, they should be made known to his readers.

  • There is a question for the Legislature – can you really pick and choose morality?

     

    It seems that most of those who voted against legislation allowing homosexuals and other couples to form domestic partnerships stated there were moral issues with the matter.

     

    So the bill failed in the Senate Judiciary Committee on a tie vote.

     

  • There were three momentous events in Los Alamos last week, two good and one not so good.

     

    First was the school bond election. The fact that it passed by a decent majority says a lot for the folks who live here.

     

    When presented with a positive plan, the community will back it. There was no doubt that our schools need work and improvements. We have one of the best school districts around but nothing stays at the top without some kind of investment.

     

  • Food stamp use has surged statewide to an all-time high in 2008. Another sign that the nation’s economic turmoil is being felt here, the Associated Press reports.

    In December, the number on food stamps jumped by more than 6,000. State data show that 268,400 people received food stamps in December, an annual increase of 15.3 percent.

    That compares with 232,696 recipients statewide in December 2007.

  • Dear Editor,

    I would like to thank the local businesses and the community for their efforts during the recent search and rescue of the lost snowboarder at Pajarito Mountain Ski Area. The Volunteer Ski Patrol did an unbelievable job searching for the lost person. The NM SAR Team also did an outstanding job. The very special, behind the scene support from the local businesses was above and beyond the call of duty.

  • Dear Editor,

    Two problems among many contribute to the downward spiral of the current recession. One is in the real economy-people are unemployed and more are fired every day. Their potential production is lost to the economy. The second is in the flow of money in the currently clogged financial system.

  • Dear Editor,

    (Inspired by the thank you letter sent from over 250 health and human rights organizations on the recent Executive Order reversing the Mexico City global-gag rule.)

    Thank you for restoring funding for agencies which promote the idea that it is the preferred option that women kill the baby in her womb rather than take responsibility. It is preeminently obvious that this issue is more important than the banning of cluster bombs, elimination of land mines, expansion of a food stamp program, or establishment of positive measures relative to climate change.

  • Dear Editor,

     

    The pedestrian lighting recently installed on Central Avenue is ridiculous.  What would inspire a town of smart people to make such a foolish decision?

     

    On-line I found minutes from a county meeting from October 2007 in which the pedestrian lights were mentioned.  At the same meeting was a discussion of the town motto, “Where Discoveries are Made” and mention of the idea of “branding” Los Alamos.