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Opinion

  • Normal people do not run for high political offices such as governor, senator and member of congress.

    Think of it. These candidates are expected to know everything. An ability to interact with others is essential. Candidacy is more than a full time job. A day off? Get real. New Mexico’s size brings yet another challenge — Alamogordo one day, Roy the next.

    A candidate is a product. A candidate also is stuck with being a person. Some candidates can’t function in both worlds.

  • SANTA FE ­— Arizona’s immigration law will likely have much the same effect on Major League Baseball as its rejection of Martin Luther King Day had on pro football.

    Here’s the history. When the St. Louis Cardinals relocated to Arizona, in 1988, the National Football League wanted to hold a Super Bowl in Phoenix as soon as possible.

    In 1989, the Arizona Legislature approved the state’s participation in the Martin Luther King federal holiday. But opponents of the holiday collected signatures to put the matter on the 1990 Arizona ballot.

  • On Tuesday, County Council will conduct a hearing on proposed Ordinance 555.  

    This Ordinance would require a vote on an addition to the County Charter in a special election to take place in September.  

    That, in addition to the Charter, Section 705, would require that any Capital Improvement Project (CIP) costing $1million or more would  be put to the voters in an annual election at a set time each year.  

  • SANTA FE — The New Mexico State University and University of New Mexico men’s basketball teams made New Mexicans proud this past weekend playing in the NCAA tournament.

    Both were out of the tourney by the time the weekend was over, but they fought hard and received favorable recognition for their efforts and fan support.

  • Many New Mexicans are asking whether Governor Bill Richardson will line-item veto the reimposition of the local portion of the food tax that was passed during the recent Special Session.  

    However, once they learn the story behind the food tax’s passage, New Mexicans are more likely to ask instead: “Why wouldn’t Richardson veto the food tax?”  

  • Must be a lot of sore backs out there, what with the Legislature balancing the budget on the backs of working people, or on the backs of poor people or on the backs of people who eat tortillas.

    The Left and the Right both found much to dislike in the compromise, so maybe it’s not too bad, after all. Let’s take a look in the glass half full.

  • When a film crew visits Los Alamos, we can’t help but notice. The trucks and trailers park along our streets and in our parking lots. Sometimes they reroute traffic or take over a store or building. In a few cases, they even set up right outside your front door. That was the case last week, when the movie “Knockout,” brought trucks, trailers, cameras and crews to the end of Los Pueblos Road and our neighborhood. Overnight, we inherited new neighbors with a fascinating business. Councilor Wheeler had a front row seat.

  • If you are ever cut off from supermarkets and electricity due to a natural disaster (or because like some of us idiots you choose to go camping), you will be especially interested in this news. And even if your only interest in daily life is eating well, read on for the glad tidings that’s coming about how we will soon better process and store food in this country.

    For about 200 years we’ve canned food in much the same way, putting it in cans (hence the name) and heating it under pressure for long periods.

  • Technology is defined as “the practical application of knowledge.” Well, that’s the definition anyway. Practical? Perhaps. Knowledge? It’s getting harder to tell. Be afraid. Be very afraid. Technology is practically ebbing into the crevasses of society and filling them with tar of obfuscation.

  • This morning, the wind blew a large plastic bag across the sidewalk. It fluttered like a butterfly in front of me and my dogs and then skittered away. Last summer I would have grabbed it, but 2010 has brought new insights.

  • This is in response to a Monitor story “Diamond Drive, Take Four,” on March 4.

  • The fundamental rule of the medical profession given to students early in their career is to “do no harm.”

    This general concept can be applied to different areas and different issues. Today we apply it to the perceived problem of Earth’s climate.

  • NAPILI BAY, MAUI — What’s happening in New Mexico? I leave it with one regular session of the Legislature expired but not finished. Two weeks later I hear you finished after a false start but didn’t get much of anything accomplished.

    You kicked the can down the road, as they say. You passed some minor cuts and some minor tax increases. But those cuts and tax increases may not be real. Gov. Bill Richardson may veto them or ignore them. So we don’t know if they’ve really happened yet.

  • With its Jan. 21, 2010, ruling on Citizens United vs. Federal Electronics Commission, the United States Supreme Court overturned a longstanding ban on the use of corporate profits to fund political advocacy – a ban spawned decades earlier by bald, wholesale corruption in politics in this country.

    The Court also unequivocally endorsed the value of transparency in elections as the first step to leveling the political playing field for individuals who want to counter corporate spending in elections.

  • Copyrights and trade secrets can protect two types of intangible assets that can be the basis of business success.

    Copyrights apply to original literary, dramatic, musical and artistic works. They can protect blueprints, computer software, jewelry, television ads and performances.

  • My subscription to the magazine Home Power has been feeding my dreams of an off-the-grid house that matches my sense of frugality, economy and efficiency. In the recent December/January 2010 issue was a striking article on energy efficiency, or lack thereof, of our national home. A. J. Simon wrote about the work he supports at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, where he and colleagues take a summary look at the energy flow of the nation from the point of generation to the point of consumption.

  • During his State of the Union address, the President assured us his fiscal policies would stimulate bank lending to help businesses expand and create jobs. Obviously, the right hand isn’t talking to the left hand, and if they are, they don’t speak the same language.

    Federal bank regulators, who failed to curb the excesses of the biggest banks, are now punishing the little guys. Your local community bank didn’t engage in the risky behavior that got us into this mess, but it’s now paying the price.

  • In the mid-1800s there was a smart geologist with a face as sharp as flint who worked in the American Midwest. In those days, the “Midwest” was quite close to the frontier of the country. It took some guts and imagination to live out there, and maybe Charles Whittlesey had both in abundance – for he clearly saw evidence of dramatic climate change in riverbanks and hillsides around him. For Whittlesey, the Ice Age was evident in almost every field and ridge.

  • SANTA FE — Some Democrats are destined for problems in the June primaries. There are certain taxes that Democrats just can’t touch. The first untouchable came along in 1935, during the Great Depression.

    Democrats had gained control of the statehouse by that time and devoted a major legislative session to fixing the state’s tax system. Many of our state’s tax laws date back, or refer back, to that 1935 session.

  • What the (expletive deleted) is wrong with a little (expletive deleted) swearing now and then? I mean, (expletive deleted) ... (expletive deleted) people can’t take a little (expletive deleted) joke? Who the (expletive deleted) cares about their (expletive deleted, reinserted, deleted again, rewritten back in French, translated to ancient Greek and then deleted again) opinion!!??