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Opinion

  • CLASSIC ESSAY

    On July 9, the New Mexico Health Department announced, “New Mexicans have a new Web site to learn how environmental contaminants might affect their health.” The site, www.cdc.gov/ephtracking

    was six years in the making, with more yet to do.

    This large data-handling project, its value and technical hurdles, were described in the Monitor in this essay of March 1, 2005.

  • In a community where science is both bread and butter, both vocation and avocation, topics like the role and standing of science and scientists in society receive relatively little attention.

  • Last week the nation’s governors met in Biloxi, Miss., for the National Governors Association’s summer convention.

    And guess what? They all said they were broke.

    Surprise, surprise.

    And a message they sent loud and clear is that the states cannot afford to pick up any extra expenses.

    There has been some talk in Congress that the states should be forced to make up some of the expenses that the feds are now paying, from health care to national security.

  • How should we reform the health care system in the U.S. in which all citizens are stakeholders? The U.S. takes pride in being the best in many ways, but by many measures of health outcome categories, it ranks well below nearly all developed countries. Not only does the U.S. score badly in the quality of healthcare outcomes, it is off the charts for dollars spent for healthcare services.

  • I would like to formally apologize for my personal involvement in the mindless destruction of cities and cultures during the slaughter of over 17 million people by the Timurid Empire during the late 14th century.

    I also freely admit that I did absolutely nothing and said nothing to stop the atrocities committed during the third Mithridatic War (73-63 B.C.).

  • Thursday’s special meeting of the Los Alamos County Council to discuss the status of the Trinity Site project was a welcome development but an unwelcome piece of troubling news.

    Many people will say they saw this coming for quite awhile, and many will be glad that the shifting realities of the situation have finally surfaced.

    It should be no surprise in the current financial and economic environment that the developer, The Boyer Company, has encountered difficulties finding an “anchor,” the star attraction upon which the whole plan depends.

  • I want to share my perspectives with you on the Trinity project.

    Our county is very proud of our vision to become a vibrant community, attractive for our residents and for others who might come here.  Part of this vision is to develop a lifestyle center, where shopping can be pleasurable, social and fill many of our general retail needs and wants.

  • It is a small world

    A new study released by the Associated Press shows that reducing emissions from coal-fired power plants and oil and gas operations in the Four Corners region would help lower ozone pollution levels.

    The air quality modeling study was prepared for the New Mexico Environment Department as part of a long-term effort to inventory pollution sources and develop strategies for managing the region’s air quality.

  • Not in the park

    Dear Editor,

    With regards to the P&Z Commission’s decision not to grant KRSN a special use permit to put a radio antenna up in Loma Linda Park. I want to thank all the people who showed up to either support or oppose the decision. Lots of testimony was heard and both sides presented good cases. Contrary to what KRSN has said on the radio, everybody who wanted to speak was given an opportunity to speak. That is the law.

  • Dear Editor,

    It is easier to be a follower than to be a leader.  Followers don’t have to guess what the future holds, they just let the leaders take that risk.  Leaders must make decisions based on uncertain or unknown future difficulties and benefits, but must act in the present. 

  • Dear Editor,

    I read with some interest your recent article on Smart Grids.  I manage a small company in Santa Fe, and recently we cancelled our participation in PNM’s voluntary smart grid program.  A few months ago we were approached by PNM to allow them to control our air conditioning thermostat for a reduction in our electric rate.  This sounded like a reasonable deal since they were only going to turn the thermostat up a degree or two during peak use periods.

  • Well, how many of you remembered to honor Thursday? It is a day that is not only important to Los Alamos but to the world.

    Thursday was the anniversary of the first atomic bomb test, conducted on July 16, 1945.

    The name of the site where the bomb went off was named Trinity, the location of the first test of a nuclear explosion ever conducted. We know that Trinity is in New Mexico, in that portion of the desert known as the Jornade del Muerto – Journey of Death – near Alamogordo.

  • As the race for governor gets going (it is still mid-2009 right?) the key will be who gets the most montey fastest.

    Lt. Gov. Diane Denish is off to a good start.

    The Associated Press reports that she has raised more than a half-million dollars during the past three months for her front-running campaign for the Democratic nomination for governor next year.

    Denish had a cash balance of nearly $1.9 million in her campaign account at the end of June, according to a report released Wednesday by the campaign.

  • SANTA FE – The Pentagon plans to shut down the proud New Mexico Air National Guard. The fighter pilots of the Air Guard have served the nation honorably in wars since the 1950s.

    But as methods of warfare have changed, fighter planes are no longer needed to the extent they once were. Air-to-air combat is nearly a thing of the past as our enemies have little or no air forces.

    Air support for troop movements still is needed but not to the extent it once was.

  • As individuals we spend most of our lives planning resource allocation.  Initially our only resource is our own time and effort (unless we were born rich).  

    Later, if we use this resource wisely, we will accumulate wealth and will be able to also allocate resources with our spending priorities.  Many people (perhaps most in the more developed countries) use what we will call plan A.  Accumulate wealth by any means available; so as to later have multiple spending options.  

  • Dear Editor,

    As described in a June 27 Los Alamos Monitor news article by Roger Snodgrass the Los Alamos Historical Document Retrieval Assessment (LAHDRA) final report, was presented by staff of the United States Centers for Disease Control (US CDC) at a public meeting in the Hilton Hotel at Buffalo Thunder Resort on June 25.

    Much interesting information was conveyed during the approximately two hours alloted to summarizing the report.

  • Dear Editor,

    What makes a town “special?”  Oddly enough it is not the people.  We speak of “the town and its people,” or the “townsfolk,” both of which entail the concept that each, the town and the people of the town, are separate entities. 

    Populations cycle, every 20 years in Los Alamos. People are people everywhere, subject to the various good and questionable aspects of the condition of being a people.

  • As expected - and predicted - the Boyer Company has finally confirmed what everyone knew, the world and the economy has changed.

    This new – and unfortunate – dynamic has doomed the Trinity project and we are now in a very bad place.

    This is made worse by the fact that those in county government have refused to be honest with us and have not told us of one thing they have done to prepare themselves for this occurrence.

    That is not leadership.

  • It seems like New Mexico, Colorado and Texas are feeling big these days. And while we understand that Colorado and Texas are doing OK, we are really wondering how little old us is sharing in that wealth.

    See, the three states are applying for federal funds to study the viability of a high-speed rail system in the hopes of putting new life into passenger railroads in the Intermountain West.

    While that may be a good idea, how do we benefit from what is going to be a huge price tag. We are struggling to pay for the glorious RailRunner now.