.....Advertisement.....
.....Advertisement.....

Opinion

  • Many myths and misconceptions masquerade as truths in the business world and people trying to start or expand a business are often misled by them. Realistic expectations are critical to business success and getting real begins with separating fact from fiction. Some examples:

    “The lack of a product or service in an area is the most important indicator of a need for it.”

  • A Native American story goes like this:

    There is a cave in which lives an old woman who for years has been weaving a garment – a special garment, sewn from porcupine quills. Its pattern is sacred to honor the ceremony for which it is intended, because it is this ceremony that sustains the world soul.

  • Dear Editor,

    The article in the Friday, March 6, 2009, Los Alamos Monitor failed to elaborate on the problems roundabouts pose for the following five categories of pedestrians: children, the less fleet of foot (whom much of the documentation calls elderly), the visually and cognitively impaired and those who travel via wheel chairs or mobility scooters.

  • Dear Editor,

    Just diagnosed with a more severe case of the flu, I dropped off the prescription at the nearest pharmacy. Although there was nobody in the pharmacy, the sales assistant behind the counter told me, “It’s 20 minutes.”

    I didn’t see anybody in front of me, so she explained, “They have left for the wait and we must work on their prescriptions before yours.”

  • There was an item in the news recently that New Mexico has fallen out of first place.

    Sadly, this is again one of those lists we don’t want to be on.

    Mississippi now has the nation’s highest teen pregnancy rate, displacing us and Texas for that lamentable title.

    Mississippi’s rate was more than 60 percent higher than the national average in 2006, the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention said. The teen pregnancy rate in Texas and New Mexico is more than 50 percent higher.

  • While we think there are serious questions remaining, we applaud the county for its continuing efforts to make the Trinity Place happen.

    If the project really gets going to the level the county believes it will, surely all of us will be winners.

    In these tough economic times, to accomplish such a feat would be a real achievement.

    Agree or disagree, the work and perseverance put into the plan by county officials should only bring acknowledgement for a some hard work.

    Good choice

  • This week, President Obama signed what he called an “imperfect” bill that spends $410 billion, including millions in earmarks.

    You remember earmaks? In the campaign last year when he talked about change, change you can trust and all that, he promised to curb earmarks.

    But now he says earmarks are good when they are “done right.”

    The massive measure supporting federal agencies through the fall contains nearly 8,000 pet projects, earmarked by sponsors though denounced by critics. And the president at one time.

  • The year was 1973.  Nixon ordered a halt to the bombing in Vietnam.

    “The Sting” won Best Picture at the Oscars.  Pablo Piscasso died and MRI technology was born. The Sydney Opera house was opened and Secretariat won the Kentucky Derby. 

    The radio hummed with the soothing voice of Roberta Flack singing “Killing Me Softly,” a saccharine-sweet melody about a guitar player whose words uncomfortably harmonized with the life of the listener. My friend Carl loved that song and he would sing along with it. 

  • Dear Editor,

    As Yogi Bera said, “It’s like deja-vu, all over again” for our county officials. Friday’s article “Residents voice opinions about Trinity” depicts our county public servants looking for ways to make driving down Trinity Drive far more difficult.

  • Dear Editor,

    Thank you very much for publishing the 2/26/09 article entitled “Six local residents appear on state sex offender registry.”  This is important information for me as a parent involved and working with youth.  I’d like to share some thoughts on the article.

    Sex is a basic, driving force among humanity.

    Our culture puts a lot of emphasis on sex.  From selling toothpaste to selling pornographic magazines – and on and on and on and on.

  • I was watching part of that new FOX Television series the other night, “Lie to Me,” and it struck me that anyone who hasn’t had cancer should be taught how to recognize those signals, the ones that tell you you’re not quite getting the truth.

    Ever asked a cancer survivor how they are? What you probably heard was “Hey, I’m fine,” “I’m doing good,” “I feel very lucky.”

  • Last month’s Super Bowl brought an old friend back from The Wizard of Oz. The scarecrow sang 15 seconds of “If I Only Had a Brain,” as he frolicked on high-tension wires.

    The last half of the TV ad was a voice saying: “Smart grid technology from GE will make the way we distribute electricity more efficient, simply by making it more intelligent.”

  • Colorectal cancer continues to be the second leading cancer killer for both men and women combined in the United States, even though it is 90 percent preventable and 90 percent treatable when detected early.

    These figures are of great concern to care providers and staff at Los Alamos Medical Center, because we know that fewer than 50 percent of adults age 50 or older have had one of the readily available colorectal cancer screening tests within the recommended time periods.

  • Dear Editor,

  • Dear Editor,

    Without the citizens who established our community’s businesses and service organizations and promoted the work done at the laboratory after World War II, Los Alamos would have either disappeared or remained only as an isolated military outpost. Neighboring counties did not want any part of postwar Los Alamos and neither the Atomic Energy Commission nor the state of New Mexico knew how to solve the “Los Alamos problem” of providing citizens’ rights.

  • We find ourselves in agreement with Gov. Richardson who has complained about the current version of the so-called bill limiting campaign contributions.

    The governor is right to complain. While the bill looks good, it is only for two years and then must be renewed.  His comment that this is nothing  but “temporary ethics reform” is on target.

    Why is the Legislature doing this? How about because the law applies to them and it seems everytime we turn around they are excluding themselves from this law or that one.

  • The members of the county council should receive high praise for their decision in the bypass road.

    While there are clearly two sides to this project, it is also clear that the vast majority of residents are opposed to the plan.

    The council listened and ended the project and they should be praised for that courageous act.

    Residents packed the council chambers Monday night ready to give their view, pro and con. After a short while it was clear that the vast majority of residents there were opposed.

  • Anyone who pays attention to the Legislature has had this experience: Differing versions of a bill pass the House and Senate; the bills go to a conference committee; the bill that comes out is very different from the two that went in.

    What happened? Hard to tell. Why? Because New Mexico is among a handful of states that close conference committee meetings. So what? Well, do you want government to conduct business in the open or behind closed doors?

  • The Assosicated Press had disturbing story this week. It stated that 3 percent of our fellow residents are part of the corrections system.

    That is scary.

    New Mexico has seen a steady increase in people on probation and parole in recent years, reflecting a national trend, according to a report.

    The Pew Center on the States says that nationwide, the number of people on probation or parole nearly doubled to more than 5 million between 1982 and 2007.

  • Dear Editor,

    I am writing this letter to pass along some important information to LAMS and LAHS parents and members of the community and to request your help and support.  The LAHS Athletic Department recently learned they were accepted into the Smith’s Earn and Learn fundraising program. In talking with Vicki Nelms, LAHS athletic director, all the sports teams associated with the Los Alamos High School, as well as those associated with the Los Alamos Middle School, will benefit from this fundraising effort.