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Opinion

  • During a recent conversation about Arizona’s new law requiring proof of legal residency, I heard two statements which, I am sure, are being mindlessly echoed by too many Americans.

    “Ninety-five percent of crime in Arizona is committed by illegals.”

    Illegal immigrants are an estimated 7.9 percent of the population of Arizona. The assertion that they commit 95 percent of the crime in that state is a statistical improbability, if not impossibility.

    “Illegals smuggle drugs.”

  • There seems to be a growing move to name public facilities after deceased folks who have made some contribution to the facility or to the activity that has occurred in or at that facility. It is my opinion that honoring of the deceased is indeed appropriate when there is sufficient evidence that such an honor is deserved.

  • I found the display of servility by the U.S. Congress recently in front of the President of Mexico absolutely disgusting.

    Dave Carver

    Los Alamos

  • Mexico is a mess. More than a mess, really.  

    It’s a burning high rise of a nation.

    It’s on fire from top to bottom — from border to border. North to south.

    Mexico’s mix of corruption, crime, wealth, and poverty should make any thinking person north of the Rio Grande shudder about its future. And ours.

  • There ought to be a law, we sometimes say to ourselves when frustrated about something.

    Once in a while, we even pass a law. Maybe not quite the appropriate law, but hey.

  • In an earlier Monitor, Chick Keller lamented that an awesome pushback had been mounted against anthropogenic global warming (AGW) triggered by the revelation that extensively manipulated datasets had compromised fundamental temperature inputs to the climate modeling supporting the man-caused global warming argument.

  • By concentrating on the subject material, council once again chose to look at the proposal in a manner, which avoided directly dealing with the underlying issue. The subject matter of any ordinance initiative or referendum initiative is but the tip of the iceberg.  

  • SANTA FE — Are lieutenant governors really necessary? State Sen. Jerry Ortiz y Pino, a Democratic candidate for the position, notes that the job description isn’t very interesting.

    Preside over the Senate, break tie votes and stand in when the governor is out of state, the senator said, adding that one should not dare do anything serious. Just stay ceremonial, he says.

  • In my household, we’ve faced the budget-busting, savings-emptying need to reroof. Twice. Each time there was a lot of Spanish spoken up on the roof and Mexican pop tunes wafting into the neighborhood.

    Did we inquire whether those workers were legal? Nope. Are you kidding? For American roofers, the costs would have been even higher. If you’ve stayed in a hotel, bought a house or eaten in a restaurant, you too have benefited from cheap ­— and probably illegal — labor.

  • The good news is that we have a budget to vote on. It was arrived at throughdiscussions that were a few  times at policy level and were more than a few times at very detailed levels. We looked at funds, departments and capital projects.

    Some of this detail is needed. However, I want to present a higher level perspective on the budget that will manifest some challenges and some questions, that both council and staff need to find answers for in the near future.

  • SANTA FE — And the race is on. As predicted here a few days ago, narrowing the Republican gubernatorial race to two candidates  has meant they’re pulling out all the stops.

    Both Allen Weh and Susana Martinez  surely had been doing internal polling to determine approximately how their campaigns were faring,

  • Tweeting Dum and Tweeting Dee agree to have a battle. For Tweeting Dum tweeted Tweeting Dee a tweet that twit his trattle.  

    I am typing on my computer. My dog just walked into the room. I am drinking a cup of green tea. A car beeped its horn outside. I’m typing some more.

  • WASHINGTON, DC — Alongside rivers and lakes, on ocean shores and tidal bays, nearly 63,000 metric tons of high-level radioactive waste — which remains dangerous for longer than recorded history — sits in “temporary” storage. In some cases, it’s been there for decades. And it’s almost certain to remain for decades longer, scattered around 33 states.

  • In this time of financial downturn, our educational system threatens to become stripped of anything but the very basics — reading, writing and arithmetic. The perception is that everything must be taught right at the desk.   But I’d like to challenge that idea.  

  • Thousands of New Mexicans have become eligible to vote since the election of 2002, which made a former congressman, U.N. ambassador and U.S. energy secretary governor of the state of New Mexico.

    Many of those potential new voters were just kids — 10, 11, 12 years old — eight years ago, and it’s safe to assume that few were aware of the personalities and political forces that took Bill Richardson to the state’s highest office.

    Nonetheless, it was one of the more interesting gubernatorial campaigns in recent state history.

  • The time has surely flown by for me.

    Thirty years ago I was a very young woman, really just a kid, living downwind of Mount St. Helens on the beautiful Sunday on which she tore herself apart. This was in the days before the Internet and even before 24/7 cable news, so our first clue the mountain had erupted catastrophically was when we were enveloped in a dense and dark ash cloud.

  • New Mexico communities and schools are struggling with how to provide quality education for our children in the midst of budget shortfalls. In this context, it is important to remember the critical role school nurses fulfill in providing comprehensive health services that keep kids healthy, in school and ready to learn.

  • I did well in school until the year my dad’s transfer moved us from southern California to Las Vegas, Nev. It was in the 1960s, with over-crowded schools, busing issues and the Viet Nam war on the nightly news.  

  • SANTA FE — What sort of governor should New Mexicans try next? If you are a Republican, you have a very wide range of choices available on your June ballot.

    When it comes to how each of the five GOP candidates would run state government, the differences couldn’t be more extreme.

    Former GOP state chairman Allen Weh seems to be the front-runner. He has now sunk $1 million of his own money into the campaign; most of it for a very large TV buy.

  • While it appears to be popular in this political season to take pot shots at the Rail Runner, Mark Mathis in his recent op-ed missed the boat. Mathis claims that the original cost for the Rail Runner project was $122 million with the final cost at “nearly four times this amount.”