.....Advertisement.....
.....Advertisement.....

Opinion

  • On the night the big snowstorm hit (Monday night and Tuesday morning last week), the Los Alamos electrical power went out. Our house was cold, and we could not start the heater. Los Alamos had a lot of power outages during 2009. The next day, my wife decided to make some Christmas buns to take to friends. She shaped the buns like snowmen, with raisin eyes, mouth, buttons, etc. After the buns rose to appropriate size, the electric power went off again and stayed off for a long time, so that she could not bake them. The buns continued to increase in size until they were totally distorted.

  • Surface water in New Mexico has always been crucial for agriculture, recreation and the ecological health of our rivers. Now, with a growing population and severe depletion of many of the state’s aquifers, surface water is also being developed as the major source for domestic water supplies. Protecting that water from contamination has become more important than ever. How can we help?

  • If you’ve ever wondered what members of Congress do to earn their keep, the current health-care debate on Capitol Hill should give you a good idea. This complex legislation, placed on the congressional agenda by President Obama but shaped by the intense give-and-take of the legislative process, is a perfect window into our democracy.

  • As long as people drive to bars, we’ll have drunks causing accidents.

    Those were the words of a UNM sociology professor I used to work with who was an expert on DWI.

    This year, like every other year in memory, the Legislature will tackle DWI. The governor has proposed some strict new measures to “defeat this problem once and for all.”

    Once and for all. Brave words.

  • SANTA FE — Disagreements between Gov. Bill Richardson and the Legislature are making state budget cutting even more traumatic. Both sides are pushing hard on the limits of their authority to get the upper hand on what will be cut.

    Our state constitution created a weak governor in order not to put too much power in any one person’s hand. But it does give the governor line-item veto authority. Gov. Richardson has been using that power to its fullest extent.

  • One has to wonder what motivates a person to write about anything these days.  Do people rant in the hopes that someone out there is actually listening?  Do people really expect to change the mind of someone they never even met?   Personally, I think columnists spill out their thoughts in newspapers and blogs not to be heard, but simply to get all that clutter out of their heads.

    So what’s it all about?

    And can someone tell me who Alfie was and why we should care? 

  • In a letter to the Monitor on Dec. 1, Don Willerton requested more information about who the poor in Los Alamos are. It is easier to answer his question by discussing who the poor are not. “The poor” are not victims of their own personal choices. Poverty, despite the myths we tell ourselves so we can try to sleep better at night, is not a punishment for personal failures and bad life choices. It is neither the result of laziness, nor of the lack of motivation or responsibility.

  • Thank you for listening to your readership and moving the police blotter with its mug shots off the front page.

    Kathryn Willcutt

    Los Alamos

  • Last week, President Obama and his family lit the national Christmas tree.  Any moment now we can expect the Alliance for Perpetual Discord and Division, (Beck, Boehner, Coulter, Limbaugh, et al.) to proclaim that he did it wrong.

     

    Jan Novak

    Los Alamos

  • As a record-keeper, I’m pathetic. I often can’t keep track of where my checkbook is, let alone the balance in the account. The chief problem determining the balance isn’t my arithmetic skills, it’s that I don’t enter all the checks that I write for merchants in the ledger. No wonder the amount I show I have becomes a tad different from what the bank feels I have in my account.

    As I say, I’m not a good record-keeper.  

  •    There are more people hungry in New Mexico, and all over the U.S., than since the Great Depression.

    “I always thought people on public assistance were lazy, but it helps me know I can feed my kids,” said Tyrone Mangold, a laid-off jackhammer operator in Ohio quoted in a recent The New York Times investigative report on hunger.

  •      SANTA FE – Lt. Gov. Diane Denish has unveiled fiscal reform proposals designed to save New Mexico millions of dollars. It is a three-part proposal. She advocates an end to double-dipping, in which retirees return to work and collect a paycheck in addition to their state retirement check.

  • Our legislators are currently debating the future of healthcare in the United States, but behind the healthcare bills is the deeper question if we really need the government’s involvement in every area of our lives. When addressing that issue today, we must first remember how it has been answered in the past. Universal healthcare is a recent phenomenon, but the US is one of the few remaining developed nations without it. This is probably due to our founders, and the distrust they had of government.

  • Wondering how to deck the halls with GREEN gift ideas this holiday season? At PEEC we brainstormed our favorite green gifts and came up with a list to share.

  • SANTA FE — New Mexico voters are smarter than many people think. There has been talk recently that no House member is going to vote for a tax increase in the coming 2010 Legislature because all 70 must stand for reelection next year.

    Essentially they are saying voters won’t stand for a tax increase no matter what the reason. And yet two polls in the past month indicate a majority of registered voters say they support higher taxes to get us through this period of economic crisis.

  • The latest unemployment numbers won’t cheer your heart, which will surprise nobody. It’s hard to spin that data and yet a new study takes a slightly different view: New Mexico is better able than many states to dig itself out.

    The jobless rate edged up from 7.7 to 7.9 percent for October, still below the nation’s 10.2 percent. We’re squarely in the middle, ranking-wise.

  • SANTA FE — On Pearl Harbor Day, Dec. 7, 1941 New Mexico’s National Guard troops deployed to the Philippines knew the Japanese would attack them the same day.

    They had been watching reconnaissance planes fly over every day, but had orders not to fire. Our reconnaissance planes saw the huge buildup on Formosa. Japan had captured everything to the north, including China. The Philippines were the last major obstacle on the way to Australia.

  • As we approach the season of good cheer, count me among those who wish members of New Mexico’s Legislature the happiest of holidays. If they’re smart they’ll sock a little of that happiness away so as to have something to draw on in the weeks ahead.

    They’ll need it.

    Only 18 days after the New Year dawns, state lawmakers convene at the Roundhouse for their 2010 legislative session.

  • Cancer. It’s a horrible thing. The very idea of it frightens people. Even the word is threatening. Some people call it the C-word as if careful not to say it out loud, either out of courtesy to those who have it or perhaps fear of getting it themselves (like knocking on wood). When someone contracts cancer, it consumes his or her life.

  • Have you ever opened the paper and winced because you saw a headline saying that one of your favorite businesses was closing?  Did you feel like your quality of life had just been diminished? The 3/50 Project is a national effort promoted in Los Alamos by the Chamber of Commerce to help avoid such unpleasant surprises.