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Opinion

  • It seems like New Mexico, Colorado and Texas are feeling big these days. And while we understand that Colorado and Texas are doing OK, we are really wondering how little old us is sharing in that wealth.

    See, the three states are applying for federal funds to study the viability of a high-speed rail system in the hopes of putting new life into passenger railroads in the Intermountain West.

    While that may be a good idea, how do we benefit from what is going to be a huge price tag. We are struggling to pay for the glorious RailRunner now.

  • By John Pawlak

    Having been in Blue Ball, my wife and I soon found ourselves passing through Intercourse. Naturally, we ended up in Paradise. Okay, if you've ever visited Amish country in Pennsylvania, you know that those are towns in the area. Much like when we found ourselves driving through Dog Face, California, we've always been amused at the amusing and often questionable names given to towns around the country. By the way, Hatchechubbee is not Robin's exclamation for dicing up a fat man. It's a small town in Alabama (population 564).

  • More than a thousand years ago, my Norse ancestors were busy pillaging Europe. Using Viking long boats (the stealth weapon of the day), we could sneak up the coasts and rivers of civilized areas, plundering and pillaging at will.

     

    But perhaps we were not thoroughly evil souls. After just a couple of bloody centuries, we converted to Christianity, beat our swords into plowshares, and became peasant farmers.

     

  • People are masters at drawing opposite “facts” from the same state of affairs. An analysis of big cities illustrates how poorly the public forum performs. We see the reasons that public dialogue is so strong a barrier to creating a new idea from parts of differing ideas.

    How do cities work? We see they do. Some work better than others.

    Does a city work if it has good workers and poor leaders? Or do cities work better if they have top-notch leaders and leaden workers? How do things look from where you sit?

  • Dear Editor,

    One of the best kept secrets in Los Alamos County is the existence of a county flag which is displayed in the rotunda of the Roundhouse. According to the New Mexico Legislative Librarian, when the Roundhouse was renovated in 1990, someone decided there should be a display of New Mexico county flags. In about 1992 the flags were hung in the Roundhouse.

  • Dear Editor,

    An article Sunday highlighted a group that wishes to amend the county charter to require a referendum for every capital project exceeding $1 million, and to simplify the petition process. This group feels that there is not enough citizen involvement in county government, which I find astonishing.

  • Some folks like to spend a lot of their time going over-time to find anything – and everything – that is wrong with America. And while it is true, there are issues and concerns that we as a people and nation have and must deal with, a very solid case can be made that this is truly the best place there is to live.

    When we have troubles – be it with the government, our leaders or our laws – we deal with them. We don’t bury our heads and pretend those problems don’t exist.

  • Gov. Richardson described last Tuesday’s Isotopes game featuring Manny Ramirez as one of the most important events in New Mexico history.

    Really? So much for the Manhattan Project and Roswell in 1947.

    But in a way it was hard to argue with him. There was a record crowd of more than 15,000 people there at Isotopes Park. And before the three days were up, more than 45,000 people showed up at the park.

  • Amanda called out to her husband, “Honey, come take a look at it.  It’s gotten a little bigger.”  

    Jeff walked into the room as his wife gently poked the growth hanging off her body and asked her, “So, how much does it weigh today?”   Amanda poked it again and said, “Just over 80 pounds.  What do you think?  Should I have a doctor take a look at it?”  

    Jeff replied, “Naw, let’s see if it hits 100 pounds first.  So, what do you want to do for dinner?”

  • Dear Editor,

    New Mexico youth who will be junior and senior high-schoolers this fall are invited to register for and participate in the Next Big Idea STEM Student Day on Friday, July 17, in Los Alamos from 9 a.m.-5 p.m. The all-day event is being organized by Los Alamos MainStreet in partnership with the Chamber of Commerce, Los Alamos National Laboratory, and Innovate-Educate New Mexico.

  • Dear Editor,

    I would like to compliment Carol Clark on her objective reporting on the Art Center at Fuller Lodge board and the resignation of the chairman. As a board member, I feel I need to respond to several quotes taken from her articles. 

    I became a board member last year to serve an organization that I have been involved with, and believed in, for half of my life. I joined in order to help promote the Art Center and its mission. Although I have learned much this year, the experience has not been enjoyable.

  • Recruiting top-drawer employees does’t stop just because hiring slows or freezes.

    The recession, however bad, isn’t permanent, and forward-looking executives realize that the most ambitious and productive workers – the ones they hope to attract – remain alert to opportunities from companies that market themselves vigorously and confidently no matter what the economic climate.

    The following are some trends that will affect hiring as the economy rebounds:

  • Defeating the Taliban and al-Qaida is only one part of the struggle to build peace in Pakistan. Humanitarian aid for over two million people who have been displaced by the fighting is equally critical to building stability in the troubled country.

    Pakistan’s prime minister says the militants will be defeated, but public support will be lost if the refugees suffer. What’s at stake is not just a battle for territory, but an effort to win Pakistanis over to the side of the United States and away from the Taliban and al-Qaida.

  • Thomas Jefferson had so many serious interests and accomplishments that’s it’s difficult to name even half of them. Besides helping to found a nation, he analyzed the gospels, started a university, promoted fine dining and bought half our continent from the French.

    He also squeezed in a few hours now and then to theorize about the origin of some peculiar bones dug out of the earth. (That bit of work made him a cousin to all of us geologists – or so I like to think.)

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    By JAY MILLER

    Syndicated Columnist

    SANTA FE -- The pen is mightier than the sword. The adage has been used for decades, especially by journalists. It makes us feel good. But does anyone believe it? Certainly today's warmongers don't.

    Evidently President Barack Obama doesn't, either. Midshipmen at the U.S. Naval Academy have been told to leave their swords at home for graduation ceremonies at which Obama will speak. But cell phones and texting will be allowed.

  • FRIED LIGHT: The tale of the tape

    I recently finished listening to a 48-tape history of the Roman Republic and Empire.

    Since I spend a good part of my day reading news and documents, non-fiction for some reason is harder for me to read as a recreational pursuit, unless I become obsessed with a whole subject for a time, in which case I dive into several books at once.

    When the recession/depression struck, I was inexplicably compelled to read about the Renaissance, maybe because subconsciously I was trying to get a tip on a happy ending.

  • Friday night at the ski hill was another in the series of summer concerts put on by the county and various businesses in the community.

    People gather to relax, meet with friends and listen to some great music. Friday night was no different.

    The night air at Pajarito was cool and crisp and the music rocking.  All was well.

    Until the state police decided to make an appearance and clearly demonstrate that we have lost our collective minds.

  • By Dr. E. Kirsten Peters

    These are the longest days of the year, with the sun higher in the sky than at any other time. Like many people living in the northern strip of the country, I used to spend a good bit of time worshipping the sun each June. I didn’t use any sunscreen because I found that after a few days outdoors, my exposed parts were red-brown – and my chronic joint pains were cut in half.

  • While billion-dollar swindles like Bernard Madoff’s make the national news, most investment fraud is a local crime committed close to home.  In most cases, the victims are friends, business acquaintances and relatives of the perpetrator.

    Such was the case with Henry Rivera, a Taos con artist who scammed more than 50 New Mexicans out of millions of dollars before he was indicted on more than two dozen counts of securities fraud in 1994.