• Our local economy is 97 percent LANL-related. While an amazing statistic, it’s certainly not surprising, and it makes achieving a more economically self-sufficient community a very tall order. Increasing retail opportunities and improving our economic diversity requires new investment, both private and public.

  • I support only options that contain four lanes of traffic and would prefer full turn lanes. In reality, the project should provide four lanes from Grand Canyon to Rover. The traffic flow along this section (Grand Canyon to Rover) should be designed to facilitate the laboratory traffic off the hill. I do not support a roundabout of any kind and believe they cause poor traffic flow given the American driver’s constant “me first” attitude. These attributes are exacerbated during bad weather and snow. Again, get the traffic off the hill.

  • We’re probably too late to solve this, but the problem is ice buildup and dangerous walking on the shady side of downtown buildings, along Central Avenue especially. When snow falls, the county does a good job of clearing, but when cars are already in the lots, the snow gets packed down and turns to ice.

    The snow on the north-facing curbs turns to ice and remains there till spring.

  • We in the United States operated under the delusion that the constitutional democracy begun more than 200 years ago can never fail. I’m sure the Romans thought the same in the days before the empire.

    Members of Congress waste about 75 percent of their time on bickering, political posturing and getting reelected. Presidents issue executive orders and institute secret programs than violate our constitution and our laws.

    Most Americans don’t bother voting or don’t bother informing themselves about candidates and issues before they do so.

  • The term “citizen scientist” is in vogue these days. Citizen scientists are defined as volunteers, many without specific scientific training, who perform or manage research-related tasks such as observation, measurement, compilation or computation.

  • The American people can hear it coming. They can hear its massive engine revving up in the distance. It doesn’t guzzle gas, but it does have a voracious appetite — for your money.

    That’s right, it’s the Great American Tax Machine and it’s on the way. There’s seemingly little that can be done to stop it. In fact, the machine has already pillaged places like California, Ohio and New York City. It is just a matter of time before it rolls through where you live.

  • SANTA FE — The Super Bowl has become too big to ignore, even during what may be the most important legislative session ever. Lawmakers certainly don’t ignore the Super Bowl.

    Normally legislators put in a hard day’s work on the next to last Sunday of a legislative session. But when a Super Bowl falls on that day, don’t expect any floor sessions or committee meetings.

  • Here’s an axiom for this year: Cliches and platitudes will grow in inverse proportion to the state’s budget.

    We will “pick the low-hanging fruit,” “tighten our belts,” “share the pain” and “bite the bullet.”

    As legislators debate all the ways for the state to pay its bills this year, some are taking a longer view. Even without an economic downturn, there’s no way the state could maintain the trajectory of its spending. It’s time, they say, to restructure state government.

  • My love is like an artichoke.  It may sound strange, but true.  I keep the outer leaves for me.  But the heart I give to you.

    Ah, love is in the air and men of all ages become poets extraordinaire. I better keep my day job, eh?

  • I just read in the Monitor that the county council has decided to build the County Municipal Building on Site 6. I commend those who voted for it. I understand the vote of those drawn to put it back where it stood. I thank all the councilors for not burdening the citizenry further as would have occurred if the third choice presented had been selected.

  • Almost 10 years ago, our country was coping with a series of corporate accountability crises in the wake of Enron, World Com and other breakdowns in organizational governance. Widespread public outcry led to responses through our legal system and in Congress. There were hundreds of lawsuits in an effort to retrieve squandered funds, and lawmakers responded by passing the Sarbanes-Oxley act. The time for New Mexico to pass similar legislation is now.

  • SANTA FE — And the gubernatorial race is in full swing. With the somewhat surprising entry of Pete Domenici, Jr., candidates for governor moved into full campaign mode.

    The four Republican candidates already in the race were reported to be none too pleased with the development, and even presumed Democratic nominee, Lt. Gov. Diane Denish, took a shot saying we can’t afford a governor who has a name but no ideas.

  • I wasn’t expecting a brochure with a definition of science in the waiting room of my doctor’s office. But there it was.

    “The aim of science is not to open the door to infinite wisdom, but to set a limit to infinite error,” the leaflet stated in a bold quotation.

  • I have been a frequent pedestrian in Los Alamos for more than 20 years. My family also loves and rides Atomic City Transit several times a week. We live just a few blocks from where November’s very sad accident took place. All that has been written about the accident in this column has neglected to mention one thing – the crosswalks in this town are the most dangerous places to cross the streets.

  • Back in the day, it was determined that Los Alamos High School needed a top flight Latin teacher. Thing was, Mrs. Fries had left the east coast for somewhere in the Southwest and no one knew where “somewhere” was going to be.

  • Going on four years now, lobbyists for New Mexico’s oil and gas industry have said the “Pit Rule” should be based on sound science.

    If they wanted to be judged on facts, they would supply a decent sampling of information. Instead, their pitch crumbles into raw politics as other information pops out in print.

  • Former Gov. Garrey Carruthers once ranked Maralyn Budke alongside our “finest governors, senators and congressmen” in terms of her public service “contributions to our state.”  

    I knew of Maralyn Budke’s lustrous reputation well before we first met on the morning of Nov. 5, 1986.

  • Members of Congress play a central role in our lives. They shape our health-care system, make crucial decisions about the U.S. economy, and represent the hopes and interests of every American in Washington. Given this fact, I’m always surprised that relatively little attention is focused on examining closely whether someone serving in or running for Congress has the personal attributes it takes to be an effective member of the institution. If someone’s behavior is shady or unsavory, that will make the news.

  • SANTA FE – What   will the next 20 days bring? Republican leaders say all $650 million of the deficit should be covered by cuts in government.

    Gov. Bill Richardson has ruled out increasing any of the taxes he has cut during the first seven years of his administration.

    Some Democrats say all of the deficit must be covered by additional taxes. Their reasoning is that since taxes were cut by a billion dollars during the good years of the Richardson administration, they should be reinstated now that the economy has turned bad.

  • A couple years ago, a Milwaukee man was charged with discharging a shotgun in a rural area. His lawnmower wouldn’t start and in a fit of anger, he shot it. Yes, he brutally murdered his lawnmower. As the man approached with intent to kill, the lawnmower’s fate was sealed. Left-wing liberal mentality had legislated an unreasonable waiting period for gun ownership and hence the defenseless lawnmower could not fight back.