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Opinion

  • Close your eyes and imagine you are in a huge football field. It is completely dark and all you can see are the stars in the firmament. It is a life challenge: you must run toward the other extreme of the field as fast as you can in order to survive.

    Now, imagine you are at the same place, but this time the field is filled with obstacles. Your challenge is the same — how fast can you run? Will you make it to the other extreme without deadly collision?

  • It is my observation from discussing the location of the county’s proposed Municipal Building with friends as well as strangers that the “silent majority” of Los Alamos residents would like the new structure to be on the original site by Ashley Pond.

  • During the peanut butter scare early this year, when millions of brown baggers were deprived of a favorite staple, my family kept eating peanut butter. No worries. That’s because our preferred brand is Sunland Inc.

    Portales-based Sunland not only makes good peanut butter, it’s a New Mexico success story. Sunland, which operates the state’s only peanut butter plant, is also the nation’s largest producer of organic peanut butter.

  • Parents, do you want your child to learn more than what is usually taught in school? In my opinion, your kid should be clubbed. Yeah, at least once a week, a good club makes all the difference in the world.

  •  My environmental column in the Monitor Tuesday (Oct. 6) extolled the virtues of Myra McCormick and the Bear Mountain Lodge she bequeathed to The Nature Conservancy.

       Bad news from Silver City came the next morning.

    A business story in the Albuquerque Journal was headlined: “Nature Conservancy’s Bear Mountain Lodge Near Silver City Succumbs to Budget Woes ... NO MORE GUESTS.”

    The space between the two-story headings was filled with a large color photo of Ms. McCormick sitting on the low white wall in front of the lodge.

  • I believe most in this community would have been happy to let the Vives-Hull lawsuit end with the jury verdict and all move on with our lives. Instead, Mr. Vives’ lawyer, Paul Mannick, chose to keep the issue alive by his abusive assault on Linda Hull in his letter to the Monitor. What’s wrong, Mr. Mannick, couldn’t prove your case in court and now you have to justify your legal fees to your client by airing your closing arguments again?

  • The decision by Los Alamos County Council on Sept. 28 to find a new path for Trinity Place and the Los Alamos economy was a gutsy move. 

    It was also the right thing to do. It means that Los Alamos will be designed with Los Alamos in mind. It is a first step toward an economically independent and self-reliant economy and community. Though it may take a bit longer, it will be well worth the wait. 

  • People are unusual animals. We spend a lot of time watching mediocre T.V., but we also describe our thoughts in written language.  We pour beer on our heads at football games, but we also study the whole history of life on Earth preserved in fossils.

    It’s not our biceps that make us people special, but our thoughts. What makes our thinking so complex, able to soar with the poets and solve problems with an engineer?

  • Despite a recent Monitor article, I have not seen the reported abundance of rattlesnakes on Barranca Mesa, not even one. Maybe the raccoons are feeding on them and anything else they can find. They are nightly and, occasionally, daily visitors in my neighborhood and have attacked pets to protect their young.

    Wildlife managers claim trapping them is useless because they will return to their territory many miles away from release.  Their abundant replacements will also fill in for them. One local raccoon mom has three offspring doing the dining tour this fall.

  • Although I have tried many cases to juries, I have never encountered more intelligent, educated or thoughtful jurors than those who decided Thomas Edward Vives vs. Linda Hull. The citizens of Los Alamos County have every reason to be proud of them.

  • CLASSIC ESSAY

    This month marks 10 years since the passing of Myra McCormick of Silver City, N.M. Her legacy grows. As her lasting gift to The Nature Conservancy, the sturdy friend of the environment left to them the guest ranch she owned and operated for 41 years. A visit to www.bear

  • SANTA FE — It’s time to pick up some more clippings from the newsroom floor. It always makes me feel good to get the gems into print that wouldn’t quite fit in previous columns. Kinda like getting in the last word.

      With the entry of Albuquerque GOP activist Bea Sheridan into the lieutenant governor primary, both parties have at least one woman in the governor and lieutenant governor races. Sheridan is a nurse who runs the Pain Clinic at Lovelace Rehabilitation Hospital.

  • The old razzle-dazzle just didn’t work this time.

    Chicago, not only lost its bid for the 2016 Summer Games, it was crushed.

    It seemed obvious going in that Rio would win, but who would have thought Chicago would be the first one out?

    A solid second place, but the city didn’t deserve to be over and out in a flash.

    I enjoyed a brief vacation in Chicago a couple of weeks ago and I’m here to tell you I thought it was a wonderful place.

    While it was not my first visit, I had one of the best big-city experiences in my life.

  • It was not surprising that Los Alamos County Council decided this week to discontinue their exclusive arrangement with the Boyer Company of Salt Lake City for the development of a retail center at Trinity Place.

    What was surprising is how little we still know about why the arrangement failed.

    In its determination at long last to move forward, the council swept many pieces of the puzzle off the table.

  • A central aspect of the art of politics in Washington is getting information to the American people. Determining what the White House, Congress and the people will focus on — and, just as important, what the content of debate will be — preoccupies politicians at both ends of Pennsylvania Avenue and legions of lobbyists, pundits, strategists and consultants.

  • In the movies, volcanic eruptions are dazzling in their ability to take people by surprise. Filming an eruption like Pompeii would be rather boring. In a matter of minutes, everyone is choked to death by a massive onslaught of volcanic dust. End of story.

    It’s much more exciting to see lava flows gushing towards towns as people run for their lives. For about an hour, the lava oozes toward its victims, outracing and engulfing them in horrible (ooh, so spectacular on that big screen) death scenes.

  • Who is the mysterious “Monitor Staff” who composed the mean-spirited article on high school soccer published on Sept. 25, 2009? Why didn’t the article have a named byline so I know to whom I should directly complain?

  • When did the Los Alamos Enquirer take over at the Los Alamos Monitor? Five days in a row? Top headline? Not even a local murder trial or killer DWI story gets these kind of headlines! In the interest of full disclosure, I am a proud member of the Los Alamos Community Winds, directed by Dr. Ted Vives for the last 10 years in our community. By the way, you missed a great concert at the Smith Auditorium Friday night. I consider that the reporting seemed quite one sided, an example of which was the tendency to quote some witnesses for one party and not the other.

  • Re: “Contamination shows up in regional aquifer” (Monitor, Sept. 27, 2009). The contrast is striking between Los Alamos National Laboratory’s Danny Katzman, water stewardship program manager, James Bearzi, chief of the Environment Department’s Hazardous Waste Bureau and registered geologist and citizen watchdog Robert Gilkeson.

  • Civil discussions of healthcare reform are possible. I heard one just last week when three panelists took up the subject before a business group.

    Jim Hinton, CEO of Presbyterian Healthcare Services, set the tone: “There are no villains in this debate.”

    Daniel Derksen, a professor in UNM’s Family and Community Medicine Department and president of the New Mexico Medical Society, said healthcare reform is too important to be a partisan debate.