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Opinion

  • Dear Editor,

    Once again, Marita Noon’s May14 guest column entitled “What’s Wrong With This Picture?” represents yet another of her contributions supporting what is really the minerals/natural gas/coal mining industry’s policy interests. The author’s opinions do not represent the majority of citizens who are seeking access to an ecologically sustainable energy and minerals supply.

  • All-Electric Vehicles (EVs) have jumped into the spotlight lately and on the evening of June 11, Los Alamos will be treated to a showing of the Tesla Roadster, the most publicized EV.  

    Robert Efroymson of Albuquerque, who will be driving his Tesla Roadster (the first one delivered to a New Mexico buyer), will be speaking about his Tesla and the future of electric vehicles.

  • We’ve all got a lot to learn about energy and climate.

    That’s the take home capsule I got from Los Alamos National Laboratory’s recent conference in Santa Fe on Energy for the 21st Century.

    It was a fascinating event, as much for what it was as for what it was not. That’s why I’m still thinking about it.

  • We have to admit, we were a bit confused – and surprised – by the filings notices of tort claims by the Department of Energy/National Nuclear Security Administration and Los Alamos National Laboratory against Los Alamos County.

    Why has this not been resolved already? What is the motive here?

    The notices pertain to a Feb. 21 incident that reportedly occurred while the Los Alamos Fire Department was conducting training at a LANL parking structure.

  • Gov. Richardson and Sen. Jeff Bingaman made a joint appearance this week to push the idea of a dental school for the state.

    That seems uncontroversial enough.

    They announded that New Mexico has a shortage of dentists and state officials plan to study whether it’s feasible to establish a dental school to provide more dental care professionals.

    Sounds good.

    The men said that the study will look at the costs of establishing and operating a dental school as well as where it should be located.

  • Dear Editor,

    In his letter of May 14, Richard Foster implies that Israel’s occupation of the West Bank is the principle cause of armed conflict in the Middle East, and that our nation’s support of Israel is evidence that we, too, do not desire peace in that region.

  • Dear Editor,

    What is with these people that blow their horns in a parking lot when nobody is in the vehicle?

    Don’t they realize it is not only unnecessary but rude and annoying?

    Don’t we have enough noise in our lives without people blowing their horns just to lock their doors?

    Why can’t they be considerate enough to look in their vehicle owners manual and learn how to turn that irritating horn feature off?

  • No I haven’t been drinking!

    Trust me, the great Lance Armstrong said it in his book, “It’s Not About the Bike.” Cancer survivors are the lucky ones, because dying from cancer sucks, right?

    Hang on, there must be more to it than that.

  • By Betsy Gillette, director of market research and planning, Technology Ventures Corporation

    Intelligence gathering isn’t just for international spies and private detectives. It’s also a way to identify one’s business rivals and compile information about them in order to gain a competitive advantage.

  • By Dr. E. Kirsten Peters

     

    One of the better phases of childhood, it has always seemed to me, is playing with codes and secret messages. You may remember a summer’s afternoon with “invisible ink” made from lemon juice. Perhaps your playmates devised code games for writing based on substituting numbers for letters, or you spent a day slowly beating out an important message in Morse code for the neighborhood kids to hear.

  • Recently, I read Marita Noon’s guest column, “What’s wrong with this picture?” (Monitor, May 14).  I had read several of her previous guest columns, most recently “Are we becoming energy socialists?” (Feb. 25) and “Developing our raw potential” (Feb. 5).

    The articles advocate further exploitation and use of oil, gas, coal and uranium, along with development of energy bridges (e.g. tar sands) and renewables.

  • Dear Editor,

    I was dismayed at the Monitor’s editorial in opposition to the county council’s decision to provide UNM-LA with a $150,000 grant: $100,000 for classroom upgrades and $50,000 for operational support.

    The county provides significant funding to many organizations and projects, which can be described as “quality of life,” among them, all recreation programs including the Aquatic Center, purchase of sculptures for Ashley Pond and elsewhere and new light posts along Central Avenue (to name a few).

  • Dear Editor,

    Richard Foster’s letter to the editor, 14 May 2009 distorts the issue of peace in the Middle East vis á vis Israel.  This letter is his opinion, quite clearly not grounded in historical fact.  

    For information that is fact-grounded, www.camera.org is an excellent resource.

    Jeri Berger Hertzman

    Los Alamos

  • While state officials are applauding the Obama administration’s plan for curbing vehicle emissions and requiring manufacturers to make vehicles that are more fuel efficient, we hope you all know that we have lost some more freedoms.

    It seems that the government can take away one freedom after another and we hardly notice.

    The freedom you lost this time was the one to make a personal choice.

  • Los Alamos will lose more than its county administrator at the end of the year. It will lose a steady hand that has taken the county through some tough times.

    Since Max Baker took over the county in December 2004, the difference in how things are done has been more than noticeable.

    For those who were here during that crazy year of 2004, you remember the fighting that went on between council and administration and the ugly exchanges which eventually led to the messy resignation of the administrator.

  • Monday is Memorial Day. But it should be so much more than a day off from work to picnic with the family and kick-off the summer season. It continues to carry an even greater meaning during a time of war like we are now experiencing.

    A sizable number of American soldiers have died in service to their country in the Middle East. And agree or disagree with the actions, do not blame the men and women who are serving and especially those who have died for us.

  • People adept at Scrabble use some pretty strange words.  My wife’s vocabulary is “slightly” better than mine and when we are Scrabbling, I might play a word like “rock” and then she’ll play one like “ozaena.”

    I’ll challenge her play, claiming that such a word doesn’t exist. She shrugs and tells me that it means having a fetid discharge from the nostrils. That’s usually more than I want to know and so I won’t bother asking her what fetid means.

  • Dear Editor,

    Thomas Roach, pavement division director for the county, had a great article in Sunday’s paper reminding homeowners of their responsibility to keep the sidewalks clear for pedestrian traffic. In the same spirit, I’d like to invite the county to discharge its responsibility to keep the sidewalks repaired.

  • Dear Editor,

    A few days ago, a lady called me to ask how to get a bullsnake out of some bird netting. When she called back to let me know that the snake was freed, she also told me that if she hadn’t gotten the snake out when she did, it would have strangled to death in the netting. It is a slow and tortuous death. The plastic fibers dig into the snake’s flesh and slowly strangle it. Once a snake is in this netting, it cannot get out.

    The more it struggles, the more it entangles itself and death is the ultimate result.

  • By JAY MILLER

    Syndicated Columnist

    SANTA FE -- Except for the land commissioner contest, all of New Mexico's down-ballot statewide races have incumbents seeking office again.

    Secretary of State Mary Herrera, Attorney General Gary King, Treasurer James Lewis, and auditor Hector Balderas all are in their first term of office and eligible to seek a second four-year term.