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Opinion

  • Each time I hear the news from our nation’s Capitol, I am reminded of the classic line from the movie “Tombstone.” Whether the clip is about spending or taxes, waterboarding or Gitmo, Government Motors or energy independence, I picture Doc Holliday pinning on the sheriff’s badge, as he quips, “My hypocrisy knows no bounds.”

    Our government leaders’ claims and actions seem extremely distant from one another. Do they think we do not notice?

  • Fewer than six in 10 students graduated from New Mexico’s high schools in 2006, giving the state a ranking of 48th in the nation, according to a report released by the Associated Press.

    Education Week’s report found New Mexico’s class of 2006 had a graduation rate of 56 percent. The study showed that an average of 73 students drop out each school day.

    The state only ranked ahead of Georgia (55.9 percent), the District of Columbia (48.8 percent) and Nevada (47.3 percent). The national graduation rate was 69.2 percent.

  • SANTA FE – All three of New Mexico’s newly-elected Democratic members of the U.S. House face re-election next year.

    And all three began raising money and getting in close touch with constituents the day they took office.

    Rep. Martin Heinrich’s 1st Congressional District is seeing much action with two possible Republican candidates, a libertarian, an unregistered hopeful and a lawsuit.

  • Dear Editor,

    In his June 7 story, Roger Snodgrass described very well the mood of the panel at the Albuquerque forum concerning public access to the Valles Caldera National Preserve. Unfortunately, in paraphrasing my comments that the caldera rim has truly world-class views, he transposed the owners of sections of the rim.

  • Dear Editor,

    Take a breather between the 60th Birthday celebration and Chamberfest activities this weekend in downtown Los Alamos with a refreshing stroll down Central Avenue.

    Tour Central Avenue and experience the transformation between Mari-Mac Plaza and downtown as result of the Central Avenue Pedestrian Crossings and Streetscape Enhancement Project.

  • It is no secret New Mexico’s State Investment Council (SIC) is in serious need of greater reform and oversight. Whether the issue is the widely-reported and greatly-inflated fees paid to third-party marketer Marc Correra or the lack of transparency in its decision making process, the issue is not whether the council needs to be reformed, but how broad and deep those reforms must be.

  • The Board of Trustees of the Valles Caldera National Preserve will meet Thursday at 6 p.m. in Los Alamos (at the Hilltop House), and we encourage the public to come and ask plenty of questions.

    Though the trustees make their decisions in closed door meetings held before the public one, (possibly in violation of the Valles Caldera legislation), the public meetings can be informative and at times entertaining, and they provide a chance to watch the “experiment” in action.

  • The glory of gardens

    I so enjoyed the Monitor’s pictures displaying our county’s gardens and the work done by many…to be enjoyed by so many. The rains are certainly helping, but there can be no doubt that much care is being given to make Los Alamos a “No more beautiful place!” It is much appreciated. Thanks!

    Peggy Pendergast

    Los Alamos

     

  • Nature has answer to the gopher problem

    So, Los Alamos County is having a gopher population explosion. That does not surprise me. When you kill off the predators, (bullsnakes, rattlesnakes, etc.) the prey species will take over. Our comprehensive plan says that we will protect our wildlife, but snakes are still getting the back end of the shovel.

  • Ideas about energy prices differ as widely as religious camps. Effects of energy prices are as far-spreading as wild mushrooms. Their nature is as fickle.

    Real effects of energy prices are so disparate that anyone can easily produce a “proof” for their side of “economic reality.”

    Handpicked proofs clutter the news.

    National proposals are now afoot that would raise the price of energy from fossil fuels, by far our most-used source.

    What would be the end result? As practice, I lay out a cross section of facts to stir thinking.

  • John Nothdurft, a legislative specialist for The Heartland Institute asked some interesting questions.

    What do alcohol, playing cards, soft drinks, blueberries, tobacco, bottled water, and nudity all have in common?

    His answer is obivious, states tax these things to bring in more revenue and alter people’s behavior.

    And it is getting worse - if you will. Massachusetts is looking at a candy tax, Nevada is looking at a prostitution tax, a marijuana tax will come in California and a Seattle will soon have a plastic bag tax.

  • The attorney who filed a lawsuit against Vanderbilt Financial, nine company executives and about two dozen other investment firms and numerous individuals as defendants alleging the state lost money in flawed investments through an alleged pay-to-play scheme involving Gov. Richardson’s unsuccessful campaign for the Democratic presidential nomination, says he is being stone-walled by the state.

  • Dear Editor,

    I am writing in regard to Skip Dunn’s May 26 Monitor article, “What’s Wrong with this Picture,” and his assessment of Marita Littauer-Noon and her opinions as expressed in past pro-energy articles.

  • Dear Editor,

    After reading Ralph Damiani’s column of May 24, “New fuel standards and you,” I want him and others to know that many Americans welcome the new fuel efficiency standards and wish they had been put in place many years ago.

    What he fails to realize is that government intervention in such matters is sometimes necessary because of the political climate we live in. What would really drive us to buy more fuel efficient cars is, as he states, higher gas prices.  

  • By JAY MILLER

    Syndicated Columnist

    SANTA FE -- As predicted, additional candidates are announcing their commitment or interest in running for top-of-the-ballot offices next year.

    Shortly after I listed possible candidates a month ago, former state GOP chairman Allen Weh announced he has formed a gubernatorial exploratory committee to take a long, hard look at the race.

  • Natural Oil Underfoot

    By Dr. E. Kirsten Peters

    More than a couple of times in the long history of personally changing the oil in my 1987 pickup, I’ve misjudged how vigorously the dirty fluid will flow out of the oil pan.

  • New Mexico claims to fame

    By JAY MILLER

    Syndicated Columnist

    SANTA FE -- There I was, just the other day, sniveling in a column about how New Mexico never gets any respect and then my cousin Margene Harris, from San Antonio, N.M. tells me that Food Network star Bobby Flay had a crew in town for three days in mid-May to film a show about Manny's Buckhorn Tavern.

  • Dear Editor,

    The UNM Los Alamos Advisory Board, administration, faculty, staff and students thank you for acknowledging the spirit of cooperation among the institutions of Los Alamos and the valued asset that UNM Los Alamos continues to be in this community. However, we need to correct a false impression you conveyed in your editorial May 15.

  • Dear Editor,

    Once again, Marita Noon’s May14 guest column entitled “What’s Wrong With This Picture?” represents yet another of her contributions supporting what is really the minerals/natural gas/coal mining industry’s policy interests. The author’s opinions do not represent the majority of citizens who are seeking access to an ecologically sustainable energy and minerals supply.

  • All-Electric Vehicles (EVs) have jumped into the spotlight lately and on the evening of June 11, Los Alamos will be treated to a showing of the Tesla Roadster, the most publicized EV.  

    Robert Efroymson of Albuquerque, who will be driving his Tesla Roadster (the first one delivered to a New Mexico buyer), will be speaking about his Tesla and the future of electric vehicles.