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Opinion

  • Not in the park

    Dear Editor,

    With regards to the P&Z Commission’s decision not to grant KRSN a special use permit to put a radio antenna up in Loma Linda Park. I want to thank all the people who showed up to either support or oppose the decision. Lots of testimony was heard and both sides presented good cases. Contrary to what KRSN has said on the radio, everybody who wanted to speak was given an opportunity to speak. That is the law.

  • Dear Editor,

    It is easier to be a follower than to be a leader.  Followers don’t have to guess what the future holds, they just let the leaders take that risk.  Leaders must make decisions based on uncertain or unknown future difficulties and benefits, but must act in the present. 

  • Dear Editor,

    I read with some interest your recent article on Smart Grids.  I manage a small company in Santa Fe, and recently we cancelled our participation in PNM’s voluntary smart grid program.  A few months ago we were approached by PNM to allow them to control our air conditioning thermostat for a reduction in our electric rate.  This sounded like a reasonable deal since they were only going to turn the thermostat up a degree or two during peak use periods.

  • Well, how many of you remembered to honor Thursday? It is a day that is not only important to Los Alamos but to the world.

    Thursday was the anniversary of the first atomic bomb test, conducted on July 16, 1945.

    The name of the site where the bomb went off was named Trinity, the location of the first test of a nuclear explosion ever conducted. We know that Trinity is in New Mexico, in that portion of the desert known as the Jornade del Muerto – Journey of Death – near Alamogordo.

  • As the race for governor gets going (it is still mid-2009 right?) the key will be who gets the most montey fastest.

    Lt. Gov. Diane Denish is off to a good start.

    The Associated Press reports that she has raised more than a half-million dollars during the past three months for her front-running campaign for the Democratic nomination for governor next year.

    Denish had a cash balance of nearly $1.9 million in her campaign account at the end of June, according to a report released Wednesday by the campaign.

  • SANTA FE – The Pentagon plans to shut down the proud New Mexico Air National Guard. The fighter pilots of the Air Guard have served the nation honorably in wars since the 1950s.

    But as methods of warfare have changed, fighter planes are no longer needed to the extent they once were. Air-to-air combat is nearly a thing of the past as our enemies have little or no air forces.

    Air support for troop movements still is needed but not to the extent it once was.

  • As individuals we spend most of our lives planning resource allocation.  Initially our only resource is our own time and effort (unless we were born rich).  

    Later, if we use this resource wisely, we will accumulate wealth and will be able to also allocate resources with our spending priorities.  Many people (perhaps most in the more developed countries) use what we will call plan A.  Accumulate wealth by any means available; so as to later have multiple spending options.  

  • Dear Editor,

    As described in a June 27 Los Alamos Monitor news article by Roger Snodgrass the Los Alamos Historical Document Retrieval Assessment (LAHDRA) final report, was presented by staff of the United States Centers for Disease Control (US CDC) at a public meeting in the Hilton Hotel at Buffalo Thunder Resort on June 25.

    Much interesting information was conveyed during the approximately two hours alloted to summarizing the report.

  • Dear Editor,

    What makes a town “special?”  Oddly enough it is not the people.  We speak of “the town and its people,” or the “townsfolk,” both of which entail the concept that each, the town and the people of the town, are separate entities. 

    Populations cycle, every 20 years in Los Alamos. People are people everywhere, subject to the various good and questionable aspects of the condition of being a people.

  • As expected - and predicted - the Boyer Company has finally confirmed what everyone knew, the world and the economy has changed.

    This new – and unfortunate – dynamic has doomed the Trinity project and we are now in a very bad place.

    This is made worse by the fact that those in county government have refused to be honest with us and have not told us of one thing they have done to prepare themselves for this occurrence.

    That is not leadership.

  • It seems like New Mexico, Colorado and Texas are feeling big these days. And while we understand that Colorado and Texas are doing OK, we are really wondering how little old us is sharing in that wealth.

    See, the three states are applying for federal funds to study the viability of a high-speed rail system in the hopes of putting new life into passenger railroads in the Intermountain West.

    While that may be a good idea, how do we benefit from what is going to be a huge price tag. We are struggling to pay for the glorious RailRunner now.

  • By John Pawlak

    Having been in Blue Ball, my wife and I soon found ourselves passing through Intercourse. Naturally, we ended up in Paradise. Okay, if you've ever visited Amish country in Pennsylvania, you know that those are towns in the area. Much like when we found ourselves driving through Dog Face, California, we've always been amused at the amusing and often questionable names given to towns around the country. By the way, Hatchechubbee is not Robin's exclamation for dicing up a fat man. It's a small town in Alabama (population 564).

  • More than a thousand years ago, my Norse ancestors were busy pillaging Europe. Using Viking long boats (the stealth weapon of the day), we could sneak up the coasts and rivers of civilized areas, plundering and pillaging at will.

     

    But perhaps we were not thoroughly evil souls. After just a couple of bloody centuries, we converted to Christianity, beat our swords into plowshares, and became peasant farmers.

     

  • People are masters at drawing opposite “facts” from the same state of affairs. An analysis of big cities illustrates how poorly the public forum performs. We see the reasons that public dialogue is so strong a barrier to creating a new idea from parts of differing ideas.

    How do cities work? We see they do. Some work better than others.

    Does a city work if it has good workers and poor leaders? Or do cities work better if they have top-notch leaders and leaden workers? How do things look from where you sit?

  • Dear Editor,

    One of the best kept secrets in Los Alamos County is the existence of a county flag which is displayed in the rotunda of the Roundhouse. According to the New Mexico Legislative Librarian, when the Roundhouse was renovated in 1990, someone decided there should be a display of New Mexico county flags. In about 1992 the flags were hung in the Roundhouse.

  • Dear Editor,

    An article Sunday highlighted a group that wishes to amend the county charter to require a referendum for every capital project exceeding $1 million, and to simplify the petition process. This group feels that there is not enough citizen involvement in county government, which I find astonishing.

  • Some folks like to spend a lot of their time going over-time to find anything – and everything – that is wrong with America. And while it is true, there are issues and concerns that we as a people and nation have and must deal with, a very solid case can be made that this is truly the best place there is to live.

    When we have troubles – be it with the government, our leaders or our laws – we deal with them. We don’t bury our heads and pretend those problems don’t exist.

  • Gov. Richardson described last Tuesday’s Isotopes game featuring Manny Ramirez as one of the most important events in New Mexico history.

    Really? So much for the Manhattan Project and Roswell in 1947.

    But in a way it was hard to argue with him. There was a record crowd of more than 15,000 people there at Isotopes Park. And before the three days were up, more than 45,000 people showed up at the park.

  • Amanda called out to her husband, “Honey, come take a look at it.  It’s gotten a little bigger.”  

    Jeff walked into the room as his wife gently poked the growth hanging off her body and asked her, “So, how much does it weigh today?”   Amanda poked it again and said, “Just over 80 pounds.  What do you think?  Should I have a doctor take a look at it?”  

    Jeff replied, “Naw, let’s see if it hits 100 pounds first.  So, what do you want to do for dinner?”