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Opinion

  • Why do we need the Trinity Project? Does the county need it or want it, or does the school board need money?

    If the schools need money, there are most likely better ways to obtain it than at the expense of the future of Los Alamos’ downtown.

    If the council wants it, you would have to do a lot of explaining to the voters why and for what purpose we, the voters, still need it after we have experienced a significant economic downturn.

  • I believe that there are some essential requirements and considerations that must be addressed before any other requirements for the Trinity Site.

    1. The Trinity Site must permanently increase our tax base. Without this increase, we will never be able to enhance the amenities in this community.

    2. The Trinity Site should have a core store that provides the missing essential shopping needs of Los Alamos. Unless this core store covers these shopping needs, our citizens will continue to shop off the Hill to the detriment of the entire retail community.

  • OK, the cat’s out of the bag. I drink a tea made from Slippery Elm Bark, Burdock Root, Sheep Sorrel and Blessed Thistle. It tastes like dirt. I eat a handful of pumpkin seeds, take multi-supplements and drink a glass of wine each day.

    Why do I do this? I did it because it could cure my cancer and because it meant the difference between being able to stay on a clinical trial or not.

    I bet my doctor is groaning as she reads this: “She thinks tea and wine are going to cure her. She’s a fruit loop! And I thought she was so sensible.”

  • Impure but prized is the Rio Grande water allotted to cities and counties under the San Juan-Chama (SJC) Diversion pact. Los Alamos County’s share is 1,200 acre feet (390 million gallons), which county government foresees pumping from White Rock Canyon.

  • Independence Day came and went this year with the usual fanfare of fireworks, political speeches, flag waving, and of course backyard barbecues.

    As always, it was a time for families to get together and enjoy the comfort and safety that we all have come to expect in our lives.

    Some 7,000 miles away, U.S. soldiers (130,000 strong) continue to fight and die in a foreign land that has become little more than a line item on the weekend news shows.

  • In my view all of the options for the Trinity site development presented to the council on July 23 will lead to the eventual termination of negotiations with Boyer and with that we will lose any chance of getting a new big box store in the near future. This is an unacceptable outcome for our community.

  • Anybody who reads my ramblings knows that I like trivia, obscure facts and stuff like that.

    Well, my wife came across this on the web and I thought it was interesting enough to pass on. And besides, maybe you can learn something.

    • Stewardesses is the longest word typed with only the left hand.

    • Lollipop is the longest word typed with your right hand.

    • No word in the English language rhymes with month, orange, silver or purple.

    • Dreamt is the only English word that ends in the letters “mt.”

  • The council is faced with two very important decisions right now. We think they are acting properly in regards to one but we have some serious questions about the other.

    When County Administrator Max Baker announced his decision to retire, we thought we were told that there would be an honest, open process. And while it is still early, we are still waiting for that process.

  • Education efforts in this country – and in New Mexico – continue to struggle. We have poured millions upon millions of dollars into our educational system with little or no result.

     

    We think it is a time for a change.

     

    In a recent report, the state Public Education Department said that there has been some improvement among student proficiency in math and reading during the past five years. The vast majority of schools still missed state-established goals for increasing student achievement.

     

  • We got new cell phones the other day.

  • Dear Editor,

    I was saddened and disappointed to hear Obama speak so disparagingly about physicians at his news conference on July 22, 2009.  He stated that if a child had a bad sore throat or repeated sore throats, a pediatrician might look at the reimbursement system and see that he or she could make more money by taking the tonsils out.  

  • Dear Editor,

    For most folks, the problem is not enough shopping. We’re not talking luxuries, just basics. One grocery, no shoe store, no toy store, no stand-alone pharmacy, limited availabilities of stuff.

    It is time we think outside the box – be it a Big Box, or the bigger box that our dependency on the lab has put us in. Nor do we want only those science and tech businesses that pay no less than $60,000/year, as proposed by Los Alamos Commerce and Development Corporation.

  • The anniversary of the United States atomic bombings of Hiroshima and Nagasaki serve as a reminder of the danger posed by nuclear weapons and the need for this country to work in good faith toward their elimination.  The bombings killed more than 200,000 people and set in motion an arms race that has resulted in several near brushes with nuclear war.  

    There are more than 20,000 nuclear weapons in existence today. The vast majority of these weapons are held by the United States and Russia, with 9,400 and 13,000 respectively.

  • SANTA FE – The 2010 general election contest between Rep. Harry Teague and former Rep. Steve Pearce in the 2nd Congressional District has been at full steam for a month.

  • CLASSIC ESSAY

    On July 9, the New Mexico Health Department announced, “New Mexicans have a new Web site to learn how environmental contaminants might affect their health.” The site, www.cdc.gov/ephtracking

    was six years in the making, with more yet to do.

    This large data-handling project, its value and technical hurdles, were described in the Monitor in this essay of March 1, 2005.

  • In a community where science is both bread and butter, both vocation and avocation, topics like the role and standing of science and scientists in society receive relatively little attention.

  • Last week the nation’s governors met in Biloxi, Miss., for the National Governors Association’s summer convention.

    And guess what? They all said they were broke.

    Surprise, surprise.

    And a message they sent loud and clear is that the states cannot afford to pick up any extra expenses.

    There has been some talk in Congress that the states should be forced to make up some of the expenses that the feds are now paying, from health care to national security.

  • How should we reform the health care system in the U.S. in which all citizens are stakeholders? The U.S. takes pride in being the best in many ways, but by many measures of health outcome categories, it ranks well below nearly all developed countries. Not only does the U.S. score badly in the quality of healthcare outcomes, it is off the charts for dollars spent for healthcare services.

  • I would like to formally apologize for my personal involvement in the mindless destruction of cities and cultures during the slaughter of over 17 million people by the Timurid Empire during the late 14th century.

    I also freely admit that I did absolutely nothing and said nothing to stop the atrocities committed during the third Mithridatic War (73-63 B.C.).

  • Thursday’s special meeting of the Los Alamos County Council to discuss the status of the Trinity Site project was a welcome development but an unwelcome piece of troubling news.

    Many people will say they saw this coming for quite awhile, and many will be glad that the shifting realities of the situation have finally surfaced.

    It should be no surprise in the current financial and economic environment that the developer, The Boyer Company, has encountered difficulties finding an “anchor,” the star attraction upon which the whole plan depends.