.....Advertisement.....
.....Advertisement.....

Opinion

  • I just finished reading the Monitor and I have to say that I am truly saddened by what I read.

    Geoff Rodgers is the only candidate who supported local businesses 100 percent in his campaign for county council. Geoff you have my vote!

    The excuses are endless, “It was more convenient to shop in Santa Fe or online,” “It is too expensive when you use a middle man,” and “I did not know that any businesses offered this service.” I can walk down Central Avenue and see that these services are offered at two locations within a block.

  • Chimpanzees walk on two feet. They have hands, use tools and language and have a complex society. They display intelligence and emotion.

    Yet the United States government treats them as property, with no more rights than ashtrays or toilet seats.

    About 240 chimps at the Alamagordo Primate Facility in New Mexico were rescued from an abusive owner - cited for improper care and even negligent deaths - in 2000.

    They had been used for decades for research, much of which could be considered torture.

  • Colorado Springs is broke.

    A friend, driving in Colorado Springs recently, hit a pothole and did $400 in damage to her car. “They’re not fixing the streets!” my friend says angrily.

    It’s just possible my friend was going a tad too fast, perhaps operating on previously true assumptions of flat street surfaces. Certainly, going less fast is one short-term means of dealing with potholes.

    The Colorado Springs situation raises questions about the proper role of government.

  • Last week the Legislative Finance Committee warned that the state could see another revenue shortfall, even with the combined cuts and tax increases delivered in the last legislative session, even with federal stimulus money. The governor is presently ignoring the committee’s Nervous Nellies and waiting for consensus estimates by government economists.

    You will recall that if we see red ink, the ball – tossed to him by legislators – is in the governor’s court.

  • SANTA FE — Mid-July is a momentous time in New Mexico’s history. On July 14, 1881, Pat Garrett shot Billy the Kid. The Kid is arguably the world’s most famous outlaw. The news quickly traveled around the world.

    On July 16, 1945, the world’s first nuclear explosion occurred at Trinity Site, north of Alamogordo. According to history, news of that event traveled nowhere but Los Alamos, Washington, D.C., London, Potsdam and Moscow.

  • The primary way in which banks make money is through loans.  But in today’s economic environment, regulators are requiring banks to increase their reserves – the capital that backs loans — to support an increasing number of loans at risk of default.  As banks work hard to reduce their bad loans, many are making far fewer new loans and decreasing the limits on existing lines of credit. Their problem is that they need to make more loans to make money, but they are being pressured to make fewer loans.  

  • On my way back from visiting family in New York, the passengers were seated and waiting for our plane to depart.  

    We were delayed and as we sat there, a man was talking on his cell phone to his friend Dan.  Well, yelling on his phone is a bit more accurate.

  • Caroline Spaeth (“Road Work a Hazard to Pedestrians”) is correct to point out the need to ensure pedestrian and bicyclist safety in the construction zones along Diamond Drive.

    We certainly expect the county and the contractor to ensure all efforts are made to manage this project as safely as possible.

  • Were you hoping that life might slow down a bit this summer, but disappointed that time still is moving way too fast?  Are you feeling increasingly harried and distracted?  Does the thought of reading this entire article seem like it’s just going to take up too much of your time, so you’d better just skim ahead and get the main point?

    If so, you’re not alone, and the cause, according to a new book (available at Mesa Public Library) called “The Shallows: What the Internet Is Doing to Our Brains,” might be the time you spend online.

  • I am writing because I am very concerned about pedestrian and bicyclist safety on Diamond Drive.

    The increased amount of roadwork in numerous areas along the road is making it very difficult or nearly impossible to walk or ride a bike safely away from car traffic from the Los Alamos Canyon bridge past the high school and up past North Road.

  • John Pawlak’s usually amusing (content and style) column fell flat on July 9 when he argued like a politician about teacher pay. Namely, he quoted national expenditures of 600 billion dollars for this and 700 billion for that, but cuts in education funding.

  • SANTA FE — As of July 1, New Mexico state government began fiscal year 2011 $80 million in the red, maybe. That’s what the Legislative Finance Committee is guessing.

    Does that mean more tax increases and cuts in government services? For now, additional tax increases seem unlikely. The Legislature and governor have come to what seems like a firm agreement that there will be no more special sessions for the rest of the calendar year.

  • I see my name in a “Guest Column” from the July 9 Monitor where my friend Don Peterson writes about troubling aspects of the global warming issue.

  • A water expert I know complained last week that the candidates for governor haven’t said a word about water, one of the state’s biggest issues. But you can name about any subject and come to the same conclusion.

    Instead, the candidates have chosen to wrangle over perverts and who’s running the dirtier campaign. It’s surprising that Diane Denish would start with crime, which is Martinez’s strength, instead of her own, which is business and the economy.

  • SANTA FE — The good news for Republican gubernatorial candidate Susana Martinez is that she out-raised her Democratic opponent, Diane Denish, $611,000 to $188,000 last month.

    The bad news is that Denish has $2.2 million in the bank and Martinez has $300,000. A big chunk of that was a $250,000 contribution from the National Republican Governors Association. In May, Martinez got $450,000 from Texas developer Robert Perry. Before that, much of her money was coming from oil interests.

  • Back in the ”old corps,” getting a paper communicated and published in PNAS (Proceedings of the National Academy of Science) was a cause for celebration up and down the hall and an “Attaboy” from Harold.  

    We regarded these as cherished publications, justifying the “all-nighters” required to collect data from a system that had no concept of the eight-hour day or the five-day week.

  • Throughout our lives, there are those few special people who touch us in a way that sets them apart from all the others.

    For me, it was Mr. Eberhardt, Doc Spooner and Col. Matheson.

    These three helped shape my way of thinking, gave me insight on my life and the world around me and guided me toward adulthood.

    I will always remember them as life mentors. All were teachers.

  • “There is no such thing as a Republican or Democratic audiologist. There are just professional audiologists.”  

    This comment was made in December 2002 by an audiologist of my acquaintance, after he received a letter informing him that he was being booted off the New Mexico audiology board. My friend was a very nice fellow, a responsible professional and, I’m sure, a diligent member of this board.

  • We are undergoing a test as a nation.

    Just days after our 244th birthday, we face real challenges from our streets up. From what we believe our government — at every level — needs to provide, to our part in what might be considered a free-for-all with our culture and economy at stake.

    Consider that the July 4 news shows found the economy on the lips of nearly every talking head. Bottom line: Our nation’s bottom line looks to be heading south again.

  • What are the most important lessons we can take from the BP oil spill 48 miles into the Gulf off the Louisiana coast?

    The first group is a batch of slogans. These varied morsels make up the bulk of the news. Examples are:

    • Stop offshore drilling.

    • The government is made of incompetent liars.

    • Rich corporations are greedy sharks headed by phony numbskulls.

    • Ignore experts. They get money from some interest or other.

    A further look finds more involved and coherent aspects to apply to this and other issues, such as: