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Opinion

  • The Monitor’s practice of giving space to Richard Hannemann’s critical harangues is tiresome but would be much more tolerable if it did not support publication of misinformation and mischaracterization of the positions and activities of others in the community. I want to point out that I am a recent victim. The aims and activities attributed by Hannemann to me and LACDC in his recent article on the editorial page are not mine.

  • Back in the late 1800s, some marketing genius discovered that glass wasn’t the only transparent thing made by man. He noticed that the number nine was also transparent, in fact virtually invisible, and hence was born the trailing invisible nines. I’m talking about the ubiquitous nines thrown at us in one of the most nefarious pricing strategies ever conceived.

    A gallon of milk costs $2.99.  A roasted chicken costs $5.99. A pound of Vermont apple smoked bacon runs $12.99.  Ah ha, you didn’t even see those nines, did you?

  • Mostly we see the day-to-day. The long-term isn’t noticed. Once in a while, though, changes grab our attention. Our children, toddlers just yesterday, get married. The lovely olive colored dishwasher from the ’70s now is ridiculed.

    Our economy is the same way. Unbeknownst to those of us buried in the day-to-day, from 2000 to 2008, some interesting and unreported things happened around New Mexico. The observation comes from annual per capita income figures for counties released in April by the Bureau of Economic Analysis.

  • The conventional wisdom has it that we, the American people, are angry, frustrated, fed up and that we aren’t going to take it anymore.

    “Down with the rascals!”

    “Off with their heads!”

    “Out with the bums!”

    Who knows? Once in a while the conventional wisdom turns out to be on target.

  • From the Monitor June 13:  Kevin Holsapple, “... Trinity (Place) is to anchor a share of the shopper traffic in our community that currently flees to other communities.  Increased shopper traffic in the downtown can provide increased opportunity for other businesses.”  

  • To me, there’s nothing like a breakfast that involves an egg. That dose of protein, I think, helps me last at work until noon or even beyond the lunch hour if need be.

    Like me, you probably often have a dozen eggs on your grocery list. And when you wake up bleary-eyed on a Saturday morning, you face the choice of how you will buy those eggs.

  • Creating shallow tar pits at known illegal border crossings may make the proverbial “wheels to spin” for drug and gun traffickers.

    Bird poop on your car is less good than guano mining.  Potentates are impotent because they are approaching the oil spill like car wash kids.

    They need to create a demand for the sludge. Pothole fixers benefit us more than blamers and feasibility studiers.  

    Petr Jandacek

    Los Alamos

  • Several alarming things are happening in our country.  As we go about our daily work, Congress continues spending money that we don’t have.

  • For many of us, sleeping every night in a safe and comfortable home is something we take for granted — but that’s not the case for all families. However, for those families there are opportunities to buy a house to call home — even in these trying economic times.

    Several Federal agencies have proclaimed June National Homeownership Month. This month we recognize the role homeownership plays as the foundation of America’s economy and how it provides stability in our communities.

  • SANTA FE — “If I’m elected governor, I’ll fire every single political appointee.” Sound familiar? You’ve likely heard that promise from every single gubernatorial candidate for almost a year.

    We’re down to only two candidates now and this is one campaign promise you can expect either of them to keep. Governors always do. They want their own trusted individuals around them, not the former governor’s buddies.

  • SANTA FE — Last week a truly amazing event occurred in the world of sports. Detroit’s Armando Galarraga pitched a perfect game. He threw to the minimum 27 hitters and didn’t let anyone get to first base. It had only happened 20 times previously in the 134-year history of Major League Baseball.

    There was only one catch. Umpire Jim Joyce called the final batter safe at first. Baseball doesn’t have instant replay as pro football and basketball do, so the decision stood.

  • The Trinity Place development project is moving into a new, more public phase in the coming months.  Since Los Alamos County terminated its exclusive developer arrangement with the Boyer Company last fall, many people have assumed that the project was “dead” or that work on the project had ceased. 

    That has not been the case, although the difficulties being experienced throughout the U.S. economy have made for slow going over the winter.

  • When Fire Chief Douglass MacDonald came to Los Alamos in December 1992 what he noticed first was the dangerous wilderness/urban interface that surrounded the Hill.  Having come from a wildlands fire background, he decided to work to mitigate the imminent danger posed by the overcrowded forest.

    In 1994, Los Alamos held an Interagency Fire Symposium. In 1995, the U.S. Forest Service attempted a controlled burn around Western Area, but the community wasn’t ready.  People complained about the smoke and cutting down trees.

  • Twelve trillion bottles of beer on the wall, 12 trillion bottles of beer. You take one down and toss it around and before you know it, you’ll see 13 trillion bottles up there!  No, no, no, I shouldn’t use beer in this analogy.  The last thing I would ever want to do is bad mouth beer.  

  • The national spotlight is on Arizona for doing what the federal government and previous Gov. Napolitano refused to do: rein in an invasion of illegal aliens bankrupting Arizona.  At an August 2009 healthcare town hall in Phoenix, legislators said that more than half of Arizona’s $4 billion budget deficit was the result of paying for three areas of services to illegal immigrants: education, healthcare and incarceration.  

    What does illegal immigration have to do with your costs and your access to medical care when you need it?  

  • When I got the news about Israel’s armed attack on the Gaza Flotilla at 2:30 a.m. May 31, I felt sick. I immediately called a friend in Jerusalem, one of the most committed activists I know. 

    Across the ocean, I could hear in her voice that she was in tears. “The worst part about it,” she said, “is that nothing will change.”

    “No,” I replied. “I can’t believe that can be true.  Things have to change.”

    “Well,” she said, “then it is up to you, the internationals.”

  • It has been my observation over the last several years that the barking dog issue is, at best, difficult to address. This is primarily because many (if not the majority) of dog owners are oblivious to the fact that their dogs bark — and/or believe that it is their right to let them bark at anything (or nothing), any time of the day … “for protection.” There is even one person in our neighborhood that drives around in a pick-up, with his dog constantly barking all the way — setting off most of the others along the way. How insensitive can one be?

  • SANTA FE — New Mexico followed the national trend of tossing out the old in favor of the new in the recent primary elections. Doña Ana County Republicans will present a fresh face to the rest of the state in the person of Susana Martinez for governor.

    Martinez has been district attorney in the county for some 13 years but not known much in the rest of New Mexico despite the efforts of state party leaders who wanted to entice her into running for state offices years ago.

  • Stories about butterflies are legion. There are scientific stories like the phenomenal 2,500-mile migration of some Monarch butterflies. The butterfly is often seen as a symbol of the soul (and indeed the Greek word for butterfly is “psyche”).

  • That off-shore calamity that erupted in the Gulf of Mexico 50 miles south of Louisiana has demonstrated anew humankind’s capacity for self-deception.

    Start with all those expressions of shock and dismay emanating from off-shore drilling enthusiasts and their political agents that such a thing could come to pass. Who’d-a thought!?

    My guess is that even such erstwhile boosters as the now-chronically agitated Louisiana Gov. Bobby Jindal knew deep down all along that not only could such a catastrophe occur but that it inevitably would.