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Opinion

  • Before I got cancer, I didn’t even believe in taking vitamins, let alone any “alternate stuff.”

    I mean who needs them if you eat properly. I used to think “Boy, you New Age people are weird.         

    What’s wrong with eating good healthy food, keeping fit and taking whatever the doctor orders?”

    Problem is, while all that conventional cancer medicine is draining out of your system, the wake of destruction it leaves behind does not.

  • In response to the letter from Glenn Walp in the Aug. 13 Monitor: Please stop, Mr. Walp.

    You cloak yourself in the role of a righteous American but the noise I hear is the self-serving bleating of someone eager for the spotlight to promote his new book.

    You previously besmirched thousands of true Americans with your extreme claims of thievery among the LANL workforce. Now you suggest that our terrorist adversaries will obtain the nuclear material to harm the United States from LANL.

  • Legacy. Hank Thoreau wrote that most of us “lead lives of quiet desperation.”  Another writer, William Faulkner, I believe, said that some of us are driven to leave a mark on history.  A “scratch on anonymity,” is how he phrased it, I think.

  • It’s a new school year and students are excited and enthusiastic as always!  Well, okay, maybe not.

  • Sad to say, Russia has it right when it comes to outlining the failed security at the Los Alamos National Laboratory.

    The President of the United States has been adequately warned — as have all of Congress ­— about this serious threat against America, yet they remain mute and do nothing.

    And that is Republican, Democrat and Independents.

    This issue is not about politics.

    It is the protection of these United States of America that we love.

  • SANTA FE — August holds no holidays for New Mexicans. Heck, even members of the U.S. House of Representatives have to give up their traditional August recess to work on the ambitious agenda of Speaker Nancy Pelosi.

    But August has many days to remember, especially for New Mexicans. We just don’t celebrate them because they’re all tinged with some bad memories.

    Every elementary school child knows Christopher Columbus arrived in the New World on October 12, 1492. But he set sail on August 3 of that year.

  • SANTA FE — Are New Mexicans getting their money’s worth out of our 112 state legislators? A recent report indicates we may be getting a very good deal indeed.

    The Illinois Policy Institute looked into the range of salaries paid to state legislators across the country and found that the states that pay their lawmakers the most also have the highest budget shortfalls.

    The average budget shortfall for the states with the top 10 salaries is over 30 percent. The average for the bottom 10 states is under 19 percent.

  • With signs and labels all over town and special sections coming with  the Los Alamos Monitor, our whole town is thinking about the start of  the school year.

    Not surprisingly, so are all of us who have worked for and retired from the Los Alamos Schools!  

    On August 19, all retirees are invited to the Annual Retirees Breakfast to be held at the Christian Church of Los Alamos.  Invitations have been sent online and through the mail and the newspaper is running information.   

  • The nation’s outsized deficit is high on the list of domestic problems most in need of a solution.

    From the president’s deficit commission, meeting throughout the year to figure out what to do, to the America Speaks group holding multiple town hall meetings, experts are zeroing in on the skyrocketing deficit number.

    And we keep hearing that cutting Social Security benefits needs to be part of the solution.

    Hold on a second. The budget deficit needs to be tackled, and Social Security needs to be strengthened for the long run.

  • The New Mexico Court of Appeals ruled recently that a certain state employee is entitled to sue the state in district court instead of being restricted to workers’ compensation.

    A friend of mine e-mailed:  “Seems like it unravels the whole (workers’ comp) reform.”

    No, it doesn’t.

    For those who may be alarmed, some explanation:

    First, this case is not that big a deal, except to the parties directly involved.

  • My recent experience with the Department of Motor Vehicles makes me wonder if they even begin to understand service.

    On July 28 I went in the afternoon to renew a car registration. A sign was posted that stated “system down no registration possible.”

    I returned July 29 in both the morning and the afternoon and the sign was still posted.

    Then July 29 I tried to do an online registration and after 15 minutes and answering several recorded questions I again was told by a recorded voice the system was down.

  • As to your article on the muni building on Aug. 4: new joke: How much time and money does it take to build a Municipal Building in Los Alamos?

    Answer: We’ll have to spend another year and more money getting everyone’s opinion on that and then pay an outside agency lots of money to study it for another year and we’ll get back to you.

    People, it’s time to get it done.

    We have the lot cleared, it has space for a building and parking, so it’s time to put up a design and get it built.

  • Lt. Gov. Diane Denish is getting tied so closely to Gov. Bill Richardson that one might think Denish is Richardson’s last name.

    The Richardson-Denish or Richardson/Denish administration is being blamed for the ills of the past seven and a half years, thereby making the lieutenant governor equally responsible or at least a knowing accomplice in all the governor’s actions.

  • From the Merriam-Webster’s Dictionary: weasel - noun; a sneaky, untrustworthy or insincere person.

    Our airwaves have lately been inundated with spokesmen who have dusted off their “down-home” accents to tell us all about what BP is doing to mitigate the effects of its record-setting deepwater horizon oil spill in the Gulf of New Mexico.

    Their statements are upbeat, rosy, reassuring and utterly fictitious.

    BP is currently engaged in many underhanded activities.

    They are contributing to university oil drilling research centers.

  • A recent Business on the Border luncheon in Las Cruces illustrated that the Mesilla Valley has fared better with job generation than both the national average and New Mexico as a whole — though it’s still behind the peak employment growth numbers of the mid-2000s.

    At that luncheon, Christopher Erickson, Ph.D., from New Mexico State University’s College of Business, said that even though the country seems to be emerging from a staggering 20 months of recession, it will probably take about three years to catch up to pre-recession employment levels.

  • Remember the four communist WWII Cambridge University effetes who donated American atomic secrets to the Russians? The latest “Peoples Republic of Cambridge” arrests spotlight “sexy” Russian spies passing “defense articles on the United States Munitions list” to their comrades.

    Russian spies using “false names and deep cover” were sneaking into “policy making circles,” snaring university degrees and recruiting other spies.

  •  Is demography destiny?

     If so, say some experts, states with growing Hispanic populations seem doomed to fail, weighed down with ineffective school systems and abysmal test scores.

    One academic recently predicted that states like New Mexico will become the “Appalachia of the 21st Century.”

    He based his prediction on well-known statistics concerning the dropout and low achievement scores of Hispanic students.  

  • Gary Johnson is looking more like a presidential candidate every day. The former New Mexico governor has now visited 22 states, appeared on a multitude of radio and TV talk shows and was included in the most recent GOP presidential poll.

    That poll was conducted by Public Policy Polling and had five choices: Mike Huckabee, Mitt Romney, Newt Gingrich, Sarah Palin and Gary Johnson.

    Gov. Johnson had the lowest name recognition but still did better against President Barack Obama than the other four did. GOP leaders are beginning to sit up and take note.

  • Job creation has been the Holy Grail for as long as I’ve been writing in New Mexico – 35 years, and one byproduct of our long struggle to spin straw into gold is the economic development incentive.

    We have dozens of tax breaks and gimmees to lure companies. Even in good times they’ve drawn criticism, but now, as the state attempts to balance the books, and candidates cast about for campaign fodder, there are new calls to examine their use and the public’s return on investment.

    It’s a dandy idea, but we’ve heard it before.

  • Being that the Monitor’s editor Garrison Wells and publisher Keven Todd weren’t here for the Boyer fiasco, it is understandable that they could fall for a developer promising pie-in-the-sky and the Monitor blasts it bold, top line, front page.

    Let’s hope that whoever is evaluating these RFP responses for Trinity site is not as gullible this time around. What we learned from the Boyer experience is that developers are willing to say ANYTHING in order to get the land.