.....Advertisement.....
.....Advertisement.....

Features

  • The Unitarian Church of Los Alamos will host “Fractured Faiths: Spanish Judaism, The Inquisition & New World Identities,” a special lecture-recital on Ladino (Judeo-Spanish) Romanceros, Coplas and Kantigas at 3 p.m. on Saturday.

    This program was previously presented at the New Mexico History Museum’s Fractured Faiths Symposium, as part of their six-month special exhibit in the fall of 2016.

    The event features soprano Christina Martos and pianist Debra Ayers performing works by Ofer Ben-Amots, an Israeli-American composer and chair of the music department at Colorado College.

    Ben-Amots will lecture about his recreations of musical settings for songs dating to the era of the Jewish diaspora in Spain, a time that gave rise to the unique hybrid of Hebrew and Spanish known as Ladino.

    Los Alamos soprano Martos sang several seasons with Central City Opera in Colorado and the Washington National Opera, and most recently performed at the world premiere of Los Bufones by Santa Fe composer Ron Strauss at the National Hispanic Cultural Center.

  • Have you ever wondered what goes on in the life of a busy bee? The Pajarito Environmental Education Center will offers a workshop with Dorothy Brown at the Los Alamos Nature Center about the biology and colony dynamics of honeybees from 1:30-3:30 p.m. Sunday.
    This will be a great introduction for anyone curious about these non-native pollinators.
    What is happening inside the seemingly crowded honeybee colonies? Dorothy Brown will discuss the three castes of honeybee and how they contribute to the super-organism called the colony.
    Participants will take a journey through the hive and learn all about the complexities that make a colony work. This workshop is perfect for those considering starting to keep bees.
    Brown started Langstroth beekeeping in the Finger Lakes Region of Upstate New York in 1974. She later kept some colonies in the Bay Area of Northern California. In 2006, she and Kate Whealen both took the Ecoversity class in topbar beekeeping taught by Les Crowder. She has a degree in Natural Resources from Cornell University and keeps a topbar colony on her carport roof in Los Alamos.
    Registration is required for this program, and is available at peecnature.org or by calling 662-0460. The cost is $8 for PEEC members and $10 for non-members.

  • Los Alamos native and poet Allison Cobb will return for a special event Sunday to celebrate National Poetry Month.
    Cobb will read from her new poetry book, “After We All Died,” and an ongoing project, “Plastic: an autobiography,” both of which feature Los Alamos, at 1 p.m. Sunday at White Rock Branch Library in the multi-purpose room, 10 Sherwood Blvd., White Rock.
    Cobb is the author of “Born 2” (Chax Press); “Green-Wood” (Factory School); “Plastic: an autobiography” (Essay Press EP series); and “After We All Died” (Ahsahta Press), which was a finalist for the National Poetry Series.
    Cobb works for the Environmental Defense Fund and lives in Portland, Oregon, where she co-curates The Switch reading, art, and performance series.
    Cobb’s work combines historical and scientific research, essay and poetry to address issues of landscape, politics and ecology.
    She was a 2015 finalist for the National Poetry Series; a 2015 Djerassi Resident Artist; a 2014 Playa Resident Artist; received a 2011 Individual Artist Fellowship award from the Oregon Arts Commission; and was a 2009 New York Foundation for the Arts Fellow.

  • BY DAVID LONGENBACK
    Pennsylvania State University

  • “It began at Bethel.” With these words, historian and educator Dr. Martha Bouyer proceeded to take me back in time to the birth of the Birmingham Civil Rights Movement. “The Movement,” as its members called it, started at Bethel Baptist Church, under the steerage of the church’s fiery pastor, Reverend Fred Shuttlesworth. It was Shuttlesworth who organized the Alabama Christian Movement for Human Rights (ACMHR) after the State of Alabama declared the NAACP a foreign corporation which could no longer exist. This was in response to the Reverend’s refusal to turn over the names of the local members of the organization.
    To many, Shuttlesworth’s name might be unfamiliar. I was unaware of this man’s contributions to the Civil Rights Movement until I visited Birmingham on an historical tourism trip. Shuttlesworth emerged as a “hidden figure,” who was often shadowed by other such well-known leaders of the time as Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. and Reverend Ralph Abernathy. But, it was Shuttlesworth who initially galvanized the black community with the aim of dismantling the city’s segregation ordinances. He was the spark that created the flame.

  • “Wildfire Day” will take place from 10 a.m.-2 p.m. April 15. The Los Alamos Fire Department is seeking vendors interested in providing information about fire mitigation and defensible space services.
    The event is held at Ashley Pond Park and vendors will be located in the Justice Center parking lot.
    Vendors interested in hosting a booth for “Wildfire Day” are asked to contact the Los Alamos Fire Department’s Administrative Office at 662-8317 or send an e-mail to the event coordinator.
    Permit forms will be required; interested vendors can visit this link (losalamosnm.us/cms/one.aspx?pageId=7471419) to download the forms.
    Completed forms and payment for the booth must be received at the Parks, Recreation and Open Space Division Office (located in the Aquatic Center) no later than April 12.

  • The Los Alamos Council on Cancer invites the public to a free seminar at 6 p.m. April 13 to learn about prostate cancer.
    The Dr. Peter J. Lindberg Memorial Seminar is presented by Dr. Fabio Almeida, a board member and medical advisor of the Prostate Cancer Research Institute, on current and emerging PET/CT imaging techniques in recurring prostate cancer.
    Dr. James Ziomek, a colleague and friend of Lindberg, will provide introductory comments.
    The seminar will be held at the First Baptist Church, 2200 Trinity Drive in Los Alamos.
    Preceding the speaker, a complimentary, light dinner will begin at 5:15 p.m.  
    Attendees who would like to participate in the dinner are asked to register at LosAlamosCouncilOnCancer.Org, or email the Los Alamos Cooperative extension Service at losalamos@nmsu.edu or phone 662-2656 by Saturday.
    Those not participating in the dinner are asked to register at the same sites.  
    The public is encouraged to join in learning new techniques in the early detection of recurrent prostate cancer and to honor Lindberg for his many years of devoted and compassionate service to our community
    Los Alamos Medical Center is a provider approved through the California Board of Registered Nursing (provider number 15835) and this seminar awards 1.5 (CE) Continuing Education contact hours.

  • Fidelity and appearances take centerstage in “In the Mood for Love” (2000, rated PG, subtitled), showing at 6:30 p.m. Thursday in Mesa Public Library’s upstairs meeting-room theater.
    The free screening is part of the Mesa Public Library Free Film Series.
    Writer and director Kar-Wai Wong’s internationally award-winning film – including best actor (Tony Chiu-Wai Leung) and technical grand prize at Cannes – delights in the styles and cultural shifts of 1962 Hong Kong, and delights in fomenting questions about loyalty, sexuality, pride and decorum.
    Mrs. Chan (Maggie Cheung) and Mr. Chow (Tony Chiu-Wai Leung) have recently become neighbors in a crowded apartment building. Both of their spouses travel frequently, leaving Chan and Chow to become friends in their absence.
    It doesn’t take long for Chan and Chow to realize that their spouses are often away at the same time, and that they are having an affair.

  • TODAY
    The Arts Council will host the April Brown Bag Performance at noon in the Pajarito Room of Fuller Lodge. Piano virtuoso Juanita Madland will present compositions by J.S. Bach, Mozart, Chopin, Schubert, Schumann, Ginastera, and an original piece. This concert will also be presented in Minneapolis in May. This spring Juanita will play her fifth harpsichord concert.
    THURSDAY
    Gardening for Backyard Birds
from 7-8 p.m. at the Nature Center. Learn from Master Gardeners how to invite birds to your yard and garden. Free.
    FRIDAY
    Fish Fry Friday from 5-7 p.m. at Immaculate Heart Mary Parish Hall, 3700 Canyon Road. Cost is $10 for Adults, $7 for children.

    The Jemez Thrift Store will have a bag day from 10 a.m.-4 p.m. today.

    Tour of the Friedman Recycling Facility from 8:30-4 p.m. at the Nature Center.
Tour New Mexico’s state of the art recycling facility. Free. Lunch available for $13 or $14.

    Gentle Walks
at 9 a.m. at the Nature Center. A gentle walk for which the emphasis is on discovery, not mileage gained. Free.
     
    April Night Sky Show
 from 7-8 p.m. at the Nature Center.
Discover and identify objects visible in our night sky this month, and enjoy their beauty from our planetarium. Cost is $6 for adults, $4 for children.
    SATURDAY

  • Davis Bengay, an honorary consul general of Japan for New Mexico, will give a lecture at 7 p.m. April 11 at Fuller Lodge. This is part of the Los Alamos historical Society Lecture Series of 2016-17.
    The talk will be on “Japanese Life in New Mexico.” Before his appointment, Bengay and his wife, Ikuko, held the positions of liaison officers for the Japanese Consulates.
    Bengay earned a degree in International Business Relations from the University of New Mexico and is retired from Sandia National Laboratories. Ikuko Begay is from Hiroshima, Japan. She earned her MBA from UNM and has served as a bridge between Americans and Japanese in New Mexico.

  • Parents of incoming students are encouraged to attend the upcoming Kindergarten Round-Up Wednesday at all Los Alamos elementary schools. Children who turn 5 years old by Sept. 1 are eligible to be enrolled in kindergarten for the 2017-2018 school year.  
    Kindergarten Round-Up is an important step in the pre-registration process for parents and students alike, as it gives them an idea of what to expect for their first year of elementary school.
    Parents and their children will get the opportunity to meet teachers, principals and other key school personnel.  
    The soon-to-be kindergartners also have the chance to visit a classroom in order to become familiar with the learning environment and the teaching materials used throughout the school year.
    Parents can call the school in which they are zoned for further questions regarding Kindergarten Round-Up.  
    The first day of school is Aug. 17.
    The contact numbers are: Aspen, 663-2275; Barranca Mesa, 663-2730; Chamisa, 663-2470; Mountain, 663-2325; and Piñon, 663-2680.

  • Chandra Anne Kluk and Jon Peter McDonald were married Aug. 13, 2016, at the Immaculate Heart of Mary Parish in Los Alamos.  
    Father Glenn Jones, of IHM, presided over the double-ring ceremony with Deacons John Sutton and John Heal assisting.
    Brandon Kluk, brother of the bride, and Diana McDonald, sister of the groom, sang “Set me as a Seal” during the lighting of the Unity Candle.  
    A reception followed at Cottonwoods on the Green, which included a dinner catered by Pawel and Dorota Listwan, slide show, photo booth, and dance featuring DJ Matt from Sounds Productions.  
    The wedding colors were coral and grey and the beautiful floral arrangements were provided by Flowers by Gillian.
    Emily and Mike Kluk of White Rock are the bride’s parents, and Merle and (the late) Linda McDonald of Chandler, Arizona, are the groom’s parents. The bride was given away by her father.
    Nichole Kluk, sister of the bride, was the Maid of Honor.  Bridesmaids were Bethany Kluk, sister-in-law of the bride, and friends Celina Ayala, Erika Metcalfe, Lisa Pille, and Madeline Stephens. Jr. Bridesmaids were Madalyn and Michaela Kluk, nieces of the bride. Flower girl was Macyn Kluk, niece of the bride. The guestbook attendants were Diana and Mary, sisters of the groom.

  • March 15 — A boy. Brayden Layne Aragon. Born to Jessica Martinez-Aragon and Ernest C. Aragon Jr.
    March 21 — A boy. Aiden Talavera. Born to Elicia and Obed Talavera.
    March 24 — A boy. Corban Endeavor Smith. Born to Leanne and David Smith.

  • April 2-8
    For information, call the Betty Ehart Senior Center (BESC) at 662-8920, the White Rock Senior Center (WRSC) at 672-2034 and “Day Out” (adult day care, 8 a.m.-4 p.m.) at 661-0081. Reservations: by 10 a.m. for lunches.

    Betty Ehart

    MONDAY    
    8:45 a.m.        Cardio
    8:30 a.m.        Tax Preparation
    9:45 a.m.        Pilates
    10 a.m.        Senior Civic Discussion
    11:30 a.m.        Lunch: Fettuccine Chicken             Alfredo
    6 p.m.        Argentine Tango Dancing
    7 p.m.        Ballroom Dancing
    TUESDAY
    8:45 a.m.        Variety Training
    11:30 a.m.        Lunch: Salisbury Steak
    1 p.m.        Party Bridge
    1 p.m.        Party Bridge
    7:30 p.m.        Table Tennis
    WEDNESDAY    
    8:30 a.m.–1 p.m.    LAVA Quilters

  • The Los Alamos Animal Shelter, 226 East Road, (505) 662-8179, has a great selection of adoptable pets just waiting for their forever home, so come adopt your new best friend today! All adoptable pets are micro-chipped, spayed or neutered, and up-to-date on vaccinations. Shelter hours are 12–6 p.m. Monday through Friday, 11 a.m. – 4 p.m. Saturday, and 12–3 p.m. Sunday.

    Be sure to check out our website at lafos.org, where you can get more information about volunteering, adopting, and donating.

    CATS
     
    Mr. Whiskers—A big tabby cat that is about 4 years old. Changes are a bit stressful for him, so he will likely need a little bit of time to adjust to his new home. He can be independent, but he’s also very sweet and likes to snuggle when he’s in the mood! He is okay with mellow cats, but other dominant males sometimes bother him.
    Lemon—A sweet older cat that was left at the front door of the shelter with no information or history. Lemon is currently in foster care receiving treatment for diabetes; her foster home reports that they call her Sugar, since she’s so sweet! When Lemon is feeling better, she’ll be looking for a mellow home that is understanding of the needs of a diabetic cat.

  • TODAY
    Nature Yoga and Trail Run
from 10:30 a.m.-12:45 p.m. at the Nature Canter. Practice yoga with Christa Tyson at the nature center, where you have a great view of nature. Optional: Arrive at 10:30 a.m. to join Christa for a pre-yoga run. Cost for yoga or run for $7/$5 for members; yoga and run for $12/$8 for members.

    Feature Film: “Phantom of the Universe” from 7-7:45 p.m. at the Nature Center. Explore dark matter, from the Big Bang to its anticipated discovery at the Large Hadron Collider. Cost is $6 for adults, $4 for children.
     
    Gardening for Pollinators
from 1:30-3:30 p.m. at the Nature Center. Join Master Gardener Kate Whealen and learn to select plants that support pollinators. Registration required. Cost is $10 or $8 for members.
    MONDAY
    Sleep Matters/Sleep Apnea and Treatment presentation at 2 p.m. on the third floor at Aspen Ridge Assisted Living, 1010 Sombrillo Court. Presenters are Dr. Roger Wiggins and Patricia Donahue, respiratory therapist of the SW Sleep Center. Refreshments served. No RSVP is necessary.  Los Alamos community, residents and families invited. Call Cynthia Goldblatt, community liaison at 695-8981 for information.

  • National Crime Victim’s Week is this week.
    Community collaboration efforts will take place for educational opportunities throughout the week and culminate in resource booths at both Smith’s locations from 1-5 p.m. Friday.
    Project partners will be on hand to answer questions and hand out free t-shirts while supplies last.
    To learn more, contact the Los Alamos Police Department Victim’s Assistant at 663-3511. No police report required.
    To learn more, visit VictimsofCrime.org.

  • Los Alamos Pony Club will host nationally renowned equestrian trainer and instructor Robert Taylor over the weekend of April 8-9.
    Community members are welcome to come and observe the event or participate in the mounted activities.
    Taylor, of TaylorMade Stables in Maryland (taylormadestables.com/robert-taylor.html), will be in town to coach show jumping and mounted games competitors of all levels. This has become an annual event for local riders, who greatly enjoy Taylor’s gruff humor and superb training skills.
    Taylor has been a fixture in the show jumping, competitive driving, foxhunting and mounted games communities internationally for many years, and his daughter Mackenzie won the International Mounted Games Association World individual Championship under-17 in 2012.
    Morning sessions for the Los Alamos clinic will be at the jump arena (behind the main rodeo facility), and focus on jumping skills for horse and rider, and then each afternoon the club will set up for mounted games practice.
    Mounted games participants can sign up to participate even on the same day of the clinic. Both English and Western tack is permitted, as long as everyone has helmets and boots.
    Audience members are welcome at no charge, but are asked to leave dogs at home or keep them leashed at all times for safety.

  • This week, I feel like the column should be called, “It’s all about me,” and “It’s not about me at all.”
    Today starts the long, slow crawl to 50, and the previous year and a half has been a stressful time, to say the least.
    It has been a time to see what you’re made of, grab the bull by the horns and hold on for the ride.
    I’ve always had friends with children a year or two older than our children.
    I highly recommend it, because these little nuggets of wisdom can be stored, like a squirrel stores nuts and pulled out when you really need them.
    So the same might be true of having a friend that is a few years older than you. Perhaps it will help you see what’s ahead and perhaps at the same time, you don’t want to know.
    I had a friend that had already hit the magic age of 50. She had some health problems, but was battling through along the way.
    Then unexpectedly, she died in her sleep. Yep, 50 years old and gone overnight.
    My heart aches for her husband, because he’s just slightly younger than my husband and his life has been uprooted in a flash.

  • The Los Alamos Department of Public Utilities is bringing four speakers and a film to the Los Alamos Nature Center from 6:30 to 8:30 p.m. April 4.
    The evening will start with a discussion about rivers and local water issues by four speakers followed by a break with refreshments and a chance to meet the speakers. Afterward, they will show the documentary This event is free.
    The four talks are:
    • Where the water we use in Los Alamos comes from, with some thoughts on a sustainable future by Jack Richardson, Deputy Utilities Manager – Gas, Water, Sewer (GWS) for Los Alamos County.
    • The End of the Dam-building Era in the Western US by Steve Harris, Executive Director of Rio Grande Restoration.
    • Rethinking the Rio: the opportunity and challenge of moving low-elevation storage from Elephant Butte to high-elevation reservoirs on the Rio Chama to conserve water from evaporation and restore flows to an ailing river by Jen Pelz, Wild Rivers Program Director at WildEarth Guardians