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Features

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    The Los Alamos Animal Shelter, 226 East Road, 662-8179, has a great selection of adoptable pets just waiting for their forever home, so come adopt a new best friend today! Be sure to check out the Petfinder website for pictures of all adorable adoptable animals:

    petfinder.com/shelters/friendsoftheshelter.html

    SHELTER HOURS: Noon to 6 p.m. Monday – Friday and 10 a.m. to 1 p.m. weekends.

    Also, be sure to check out the website at lafos.org, to get more information about volunteering, adopting and donating, as well as read up on some of your favorite animals and learn more about special needs animals or cats and dogs currently in foster care. 

    All adoptable pets are microchipped, spayed or neutered, and up-to-date on vaccinations.

  • The Pajarito Environmental Education Center is offering two Take Wing events that are offered to those who donate $150 or more to its capital campaign.
    PEEC is raising roughly $1.2 million through the capital campaign to fund indoor and outdoor exhibits and a professional planetarium projector for the new Los Alamos County Nature Center.
    On Saturday, there will be a chance to visit the numerous geothermal hot springs at the unusual Sulphur Springs. Husband and wife team Fraser and Cathy Goff will lead the tour and interpret the geology of the area, which they have studied extensively. The Goffs will lead another tour on Monday, this time through the Valles Caldera, including areas not visited on the regular Valles tours. The Sulphur tour will be from 9 a.m.-noon. For directions to the meeting location, call PEEC.

  • While the walls are going up and the roof is raised, a lot of work is going on behind the scenes to bring together all the elements that will make the Los Alamos County Nature Center a new resource for the community.
    The Pajarito Environmental Education Center is working with professionals to design not only the exhibits, but also a new app that will be one of the highlights of the new center. The app will provide trail recommendations, and PEEC is calling on members of the community to submit photographs of local trails to be used for the app.
    The photographs should be of local trails and can be with or without people, though with people is preferred. Each photograph must be accompanied by the name of the trail and, if possible, when the photo was taken. By submitting the photograph, the photographer agrees to release it to PEEC and gives PEEC permission to use the likeness of the people included. Credit will be given to the photographer, so the photographer’s name should also be included.
    The new app, called Los Alamos Trails, will be available on every platform. It will allow people to enter criteria (such as “I want to go on a three mile hike that’s good for dogs and see wildflowers”) and get trail recommendations, guides, and views from user-submitted photos.  

  • Los Alamos
    Sombrillo Nursing and Rehab, 1101 Sombrillo Ct.
    Date inspected: July 23
    Violations: None.
    Status of Establishment: Approved. No follow up required.

    China Moon, 121 Central Park Square
    Date inspected: July 23
    Violations: Two high-risk violations. Refrigerator and freezer are both not holding proper cold temperatures and need to be serviced. One moderate-risk violation. Thermometer inside one of the refrigerators not holding proper temperatures. Silverware needs to be inverted, which was corrected at time of inspection.
    Status of Establishment: Approved. Follow up required on July 31.

    China Moon, 121 Central Park Square
    Date inspected: July 28
    Violations: One high-risk violation. Refrigerator not at proper temperatures for butter and vegetables, which was corrected at time of inspection.
    Status of Establishment: Approved. Follow up from July 23. No further follow up required.

  • The Harvest Moon rises over North Mesa Sept. 11. 

  • For the first time in Taos, and for the 40th annual Taos Fall Arts Festival, 26 artists will present 20 outdoor art installations along a .7 mile stretch of historic Taos as part of “The Paseo,” on Sept. 26 — the first day of the festival. The Paseo will feature art installations, performance pieces, projected light and sound and temporary murals. There is no charge to attend.
    “We wanted to bring new energy to Taos, so The Paseo allows us to come together as a community and share these incredible installation pieces that might not have been seen,” said The Paseo Director J. Matt Thomas, in a recent interview. “Taos is known for its art and so much of it is inside on a gallery wall. So here’s an opportunity to engage the entire community where everyone has the ability to see the art and enjoy it.”
    The artists are among more than 30 who were invited by a group of multi-disciplinary advisors to propose art pieces for the one-day event. A voting process based on appropriateness, budget, and artist’s resume narrowed the slate to the 26 installations.

  • Teatro Paraguas announces its 11th season of Latino theater in Santa Fe, presenting six productions and two co-productions. The season includes four original productions by New Mexico playwrights.
    “When The Stars Trembled in Rio Puerco,” by New Mexico playwright Shebana Coelho, based on the oral histories collected by Nasario Garcia in the Rio Puerco Valley south of Cuba in the 1970s, will be presented Sept. 25-28 at the National Hispanic Cultural Center in Albuquerque.  
    The play was presented at Teatro Paraguas in April 2014 to enthusiastic audiences.  The play captures the joys and sorrows, trials and tribulations of rural life before World War II in New Mexico. Shebana Coehlo directs a cast including Rudy Fernandez, Anna Maria Gonzales, Amador Gonzales, Maria Cristina Lopez, Oscar Rodriguez and JoJo Sena de Tarnoff.
    “Confessions of a Mexpatriate,” a humorous and irreverent one-man show by Raul Garza, comes to Teatro Paraguas Oct. 17-19 after a successful run in Austin, Texas. Mical Trejo plays the modern-day, media-minded Mexican-American who wants to unplug from his American side and connect with his Mexican roots in the land of his ancestors.

  • Diverse work representing three cultures distinguishes the outstanding art of the 21st Annual Pojoaque Art Tour. Bike or GPS the way in a day, from Pojoaque Pueblo, through Nambé and Pojoaque, to San Ildefonso Pueblo.
    An artists’ reception will be from 5-8 p.m. Friday, hosted by Than Povi Fine Art Gallery (Exit 176 in Cuyamungue), features food and refreshments, Native Dances, a silent auction and a chance to meet th artists themselves! 
    The Pojoaque River Art Tour, a Northern New Mexico tri-cultural art experience, includes 16 stops and 24 artists and artisans.
The journey through Pojoaque’s inspired ambience can still be navigated in a single day.
    As they follow the tour, art-watchers will be rewarded with a wide array of paint and print-syles and media, including contemporary and traditional oil and acrylic paintings, mixed media, assemblage, monotypes, Sumi-e, watercolor, egg tempera, gouache and pastel.

  • Los Alamos Youth Leadership wants the community to get together for the annual homecoming bonfire, 7:30 p.m. today in the Sullivan Field parking lot.
     Everyone is welcome to support the football team, and roast s’mores and enjoy an evening filled with music and ’Topper spirit. The event won’t go past 9:30 p.m. and the Los Alamos Fire Department and Chief Troy Hughes will be standing by to ensure everyone’s safety.
    The LAYL program for high school students eager to help out their community started in 2005, and is sponsored by Los Alamos National Bank (LANB), Juvenile Justice Advisory Board (JJAB) and the Family YMCA.
    In attendance will be LAYL, the fall coaches and athletes, cheerleaders, marching band members and Los Alamos High School students at the thrilling bonfire event.
     

  • Coleen Meyer, an experienced and passionate geocacher, will teach the ins-and-outs of geocaching in a free program from 5:30-7:30 p.m. Friday at the Pajarito Environmental Education Center.
    Meyer will start the program by describing geocaching and explaining how to play the game. Then she will briefly talk about the history of the technology. Key points Meyer will cover include GroundSpeak’s geocaching.com website and setting up an account, what equipment is needed and what to look for (samples will be available).
    She will also describe Earthcaches, virtual caches, geocaching events and mega-events, as well as what to do once you find a cache, and safety issues that can come up while you play.
    Other topics include how to hide a cache, geocaching lingo, and trackables. After learning about the activity, the group will go outside and find a cache near PEEC.
    Those who have a GPS unit should bring it to the program and be familiar with how to use it. Meyer will go over different ways to enter cache information into a GPS device.
    Coleen Meyer has been geocaching since 2008, when she had to cajole a 4-year-old out of his GPS unit to get started. After hearing about the activity, her brother, niece and nephew took her out to give it a try.

  • The September meeting of the Los Alamos Mountaineers will feature a presentation by Carol Kotchek, a staff member at the American Alpine Club who has been climbing for more than 30 years, including a number of years working a number of classic climbs in the Yosemite Valley.
    Her presentation will focus on a trek up a 6,100-meter peak in the Khumu region of Nepal. Normally a climber who prefers T-shirt weather and steep rock, Kotchek says that on a whim she decided to get a taste of some Himalayan altitude. She will offer lessons in how an inexperienced and naïve mountaineering neophyte prevailed during her Himalayan trek, sharing both the joys and the pitfalls, the ignorance and the luck, that accompanied her to the summit.
    The LA Mountaineers meeting will start at 7 p.m. today in Fuller Lodge.
    Kotchek has been on staff at the AAC in Golden, Colorado, since 2002. She started climbing at the City of Rocks, Idaho, in the era of painter pants, rugby shirts, and clanging hexes. “Having climbed through the leopard skin Lycra phase I’m now back to placing trad gear with an occasional foray to sport climbing areas,” she said.

  • The Chamisa Staff support Assets In Action’s College/Military Day on Sept. 5. The day highlighted the variety of educational paths is one of several events during Assets Month.
    The County Council has issued a proclamation to local businesses as several locations collecting change throughout the month to support the program. To host a can, call 695-9139.
    From left, Tricia Javernick, Becky Sims, Kris Sandford, Michelle Wright and Becky Littleton. 

  • This is the week when we all are Hilltoppers by the time Friday arrives.
    The schools all celebrate with spirit week, my favorite is pajama day, but I don’t work anywhere holding one of those days.
    Wouldn’t it be fun to see all of the local businesses participating in pajama day one year? Oh what the tourists would think as they drove into town. Maybe it would bring a whole new meaning to, “sleepy little town.”
    Elementary schools make banners and flags to wave as the parade passes by and some will, “wait until the midnight hour,” to get those floats assembled in time.
    It feels good to all be united for a common goal, a common mission and as we head into homecoming, I hope you will wear the green and gold proudly and go one step further.
    Those who know me well must know that I am by no means technology clad. I randomly Facebook, very occasionally Twitter, but I do like to text.
    Well, Friday, there is an electronic social movement called, the It Can Wait movement!
    On Sept. 19, the third annual day of action will take place to teach people of all ages, not just youth, that you shouldn’t text and drive.

  • Teralene (Terry) Foxx has worn many hats when it comes to her involvement with the Pajarito Environmental Education Center. Foxx recently stepped down as board president, a position she held for a little over a year and half. Board Vice President Felicia Orth, will take over the Interim President until the next board election in October. Bob Walker has been voted in to take Orth’s position.
    Foxx is a staple around Los Alamos as a fire specialist, storyteller and teacher, while continuing to volunteer at PEEC. “I just finished teaching a plant identification class with Craig Martin,” Foxx said, referring to the four-week, outdoor course that showed participants how to identify plants that are commonly seen around the area.
    She was instrumental in overseeing the start of the Los Alamos County Nature Center and she will continue to help with the preparation of its grand opening in 2015.
    Foxx was raised on a wheat ranch in southern Idaho. She was acclimated to the outdoors and the environment from an early age. “My mom would take us around, talk to us about flowers and pick up snakes,” she said in an interview with PEEC. “I was immersed in the natural world with people who loved the environment.”

  • Sept. 14-20, 2014
    For information, call the Betty Ehart Senior Center (BESC) at 662-8920, the White Rock Senior Center (WRSC) at 662-8200 and “Day Out” (adult day care, 8 a.m.-4 p.m.) at 661-0081. Reservations must be made by 10 a.m. for daily lunches.
    September is National
    Senior Center Month
    Betty Ehart
    MONDAY
    8:45 a.m. Cardio
    10:30 a.m. Feldenkreis class
    10:30 a.m. Advisory council meeting
    11:30 a.m. Lunch: Bratwurst & sauerkraut
    7 p.m. Ballroom dancing
    TUESDAY
    8:30 a.m. Mac users group
    8:45 a.m. Variety training
    10 a.m. Computer users group
    11:30 a.m. Lunch: Chef salad
    1 p.m. Bingo
    1 p.m. MindBody massage
    7 p.m. Bridge
    7:30 p.m. Table tennis
    WEDNESDAY
    8:30 a.m. LAVA quilters
    8:45 a.m. Cardio plus exercise
    10:45 a.m. Music with Ruth
    11:30 a.m. Lunch: Pot roast
    1:15 p.m. Alzheimer’s support
    1:30 p.m. Daytime duplicate bridge
    THURSDAY
    8:30 a.m. Walk-in-the-woods
    8:45 a.m. Variety training
    9 a.m. Toenail clipping
    10-11 a.m. Ukulele lesson
    11:30 a.m. Lunch: Chicken fried steak
    1:30 p.m. Beginning tap dancing
    2 p.m. Ballroom dancing
    6:30 p.m. Chess
    7 p.m. Bridge

  •  

     The Los Alamos Animal Shelter, 226 East Road, 662-8179, has a great selection of adoptable pets just waiting for their forever home, so come adopt a new best friend today! Be sure to check out the Petfinder website for pictures of all adorable adoptable animals:

    petfinder.com/shelters/friendsoftheshelter.html

    SHELTER HOURS: Noon to 6 p.m. Monday – Friday and 10 a.m. to 1 p.m. weekends.

    Also, be sure to check out the website at lafos.org, to get more information about volunteering, adopting and donating, as well as read up on some of your favorite animals and learn more about special needs animals or cats and dogs currently in foster care. 

    All adoptable pets are microchipped, spayed or neutered, and up-to-date on vaccinations.

  •  

    Today 

    The Zone is now open after school, 3-5 p.m. weekdays. It’s open to all school age kids, and a relaxed attitude to noise applies, so if kids want to listen to music, watch a video, or chat with friends, nobody’s going to come by and say “Hush.” All other library policies apply.

     

    Downtown Dogs. A weekly walking group for dogs and humans. The walk starts from Pet Pangaea at 6 p.m. for a stroll around downtown Los Alamos. Bring a leash, no longer than six feet.

     

  •  

    LA Genealogical Association holds first meeting

     

    The Los Alamos Genealogical Association will meet 7 p.m. tonight at the Mesa Public Library. This is the first meeting for this year and will present and discuss several news items and announcements, including updates on the Guaje Pines Cemetery and its status on the FindAGrave and the Billion Graves websites, a report from the FGS Conference recently held in San Antonio, Texas and a short clip from the “Who Do You Think You Are?” TV series on The Learning Channel.

    There will also be a no host dinner, 5:30 p.m. prior to the meeting at China Moon in the Central Park Square. The public is invited.

  • The Mesa Public Library is featuring artwork from a New Mexico artist that is simply “the bomb. ”
    “Detonography: The Art of Evelyn Rosenberg” can be viewed by the public from 10 a.m.-6 p.m. in the upstairs gallery through Sept. 30 and is displayed in conjunction with the Los Alamos ScienceFest.
    Rosenberg will be signing her book demonstrating her technique, “Detonography: The Explosive Art of Evelyn Rosenberg” at 7 p.m. Sept. 11 at the gallery. The signing and talk will be a part of the Authors Speak Series.
    Rosenberg invented the way of making sculpture by forming metal with plastic explosives. She said she has found a way to transform weapons into an artistic creation. “The technique is very dramatic,” she said.
    Originally from Washington, D.C., she was a student of philosophy and English Literature. That background, she said, resonates in her artwork.
    She moved to New Mexico with her husband who worked at Sandia Laboratory. She earned her degree in fine arts and printmaking.
    While studying in Jerusalem, she met a man who was an explosive engineer and so sprung the idea for a type of artwork to explore.

  • Less than a decade after he helped craft the weapons that helped bring an end to World War II, Robert Oppenheimer was stripped of his top security clearance. In a public display played out in the nation’s newspapers, he was removed as even an advisor to the Atomic Energy Commission. Learn more about “Oppie’s” fall from grace when Dr. Jon Hunner, interim director of the New Mexico History Museum, speaks on “Broken by Secrets: Robert Oppenheimer and the Early Atomic Age.” The Free First Friday Evening Talk will be 6 p.m. Oct. 3 in the Meem Community Room.
    Museum admission is free from
    5-8 p.m.
    Hunner, a history professor at New Mexico State University, is author of two books about the Manhattan Project and its aftermath, “Inventing Los Alamos: The Growth of an Atomic Community” (University of Oklahoma Press, 2004) and “J. Robert Oppenheimer, the Cold War, and the Atomic West” (University of Oklahoma Press, 2009).