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Features

  • I hope you won’t mind one more column on our adventures to praise the great people in our community.
    Kudos Piñon Park Pool, a free community swim, friendly staff free pool toys to borrow.

    Next was the first lemonade stand for three little girls when LAPD Officer Gallegos stopped by for a visit. While the girls were elated to have a man in blue because lemonade was free for firemen and police officers, he wanted to pay.

    He proceeded to give the girls free stickers and asked them to display them proudly just if any fire fighters did stop too.

    The next event with Kiwanis at PEEC had free smores, campfire stories and songs. Joy brought the excitement as the head campfire girl with her lovely daughter standing outside with their mouths open wide and belting out songs about lemon drops and gum drops.

    Our next creator of fun is Mesa Public Librarian Angelina Manfredi. While I would love to write an entire article just about

    Angie, I’m forced to highlight her goodness in just a paragraph or two.

    Manfredi and her Women of White Rock (WOW) held an event that we stumbled upon, a stuffed animal sleep over at the library!

  • NEW YORK (AP) — John Mayer never relied on multicolored lighting, confetti and pyrotechnics to help him during his live shows, like some of his peers.

    But the singer-songwriter-guitarist wanted to step up his game, and he said watching Drake perform live encouraged him to beef up his stage production and take more risks during his concerts.

    Mayer will launch the second leg of his Search for Everything World Tour on Tuesday in Albuquerque, New Mexico. The new live shows have been a departure for the Grammy winner, who now performs with a colorful and futuristic L.E.D. wall and floor.

    "I wanted to have a really big show. I want to be competitive. I want to be in the world where people are creating bigger and better shows," Mayer said. "I think there's a healthy competition involved in it. I went and saw Drake's show and ... real artists say, 'Wow!' And then they go, '(Expletive).' Right? Because you see something that wows you and as an artist yourself you go, 'I want a little of that.'"

    The 39-year-old recently wrapped a tour with Dead & Company, his supergroup with Grateful Dead's Mickey Hart, Bill Kreutzmann and Bob Weir. His summer tour wraps Sept. 3 in Noblesville, Indiana.

  • It’s time for all riders to showcase their equestrian talents in Western and English categories at the annual Los Alamos County Horse Show at Brewer Arena July 22, starting at 9 a.m.
    The Los Alamos County Horse Show offers four age categories (ages 9 and under), 10–13, 14–18 and adult, and many different horsemanship class categories.
    The fees range from $5 per youth class entry, $8 per adult class entry, and $30 per family (four or more participants from immediate family living in the same household).
    Prizes include place ribbons, horse show t-shirts and buckles.
    Pre-registration is through at 7 p.m. Thursday.
    Submit forms to the Parks, Recreation’s Administrative offices at the Aquatic Center.
    For more information, contact the PROS Division at 662-8170, visit the website at losalamosnm.us or email lacrec@lacnm.us.

  • The Los Alamos Mountaineers will meet at 6:45 p.m. July 25 at the Los Alamos Nature Center for a presentation by Rich Spritz, as he shares his experience recreating the Shackleton traverse.
    “Men wanted for hazardous journey. Low wages, bitter cold, long hours of complete darkness. Safe return doubtful. Honor and recognition in event of success,” Spritz said of the adventure.
    The Imperial Trans-Antarctic Expedition of 1914-17 was a Grand Failure, from which Sir Ernest Shackleton emerged as a great leader.
    Spritz took part in a National Geographic mini-expedition to recreate the historic Shackleton traverse of South Georgia for the 100th anniversary. Safe return doubtful.
    Social starts at 6:45 p.m., followed by reports of recent and upcoming trips at 7 p.m. Program starts at 7:30 p.m.

  • The Military Order of the World Wars will meet Tuesday for its annual picnic.
    The meeting will be in the Los Alamos County Sheriff’s Posse Shack on North Mesa. (Note the change in location for this month’s meeting only.)
    This month’s speaker is Rick Wallace, Ph.D., who will discuss the astronomical significance of the sun, summer solstice and its resulting seasons. He will also talk about eclipses especially the one that will cross the United States on Aug. 21.
    The Posse Shack is on North Mesa Road. Take Diamond Drive east through the Golf Course and straight through the traffic circle and up the hill. Follow the road around for about one mile. The shack is on the left, and there is parking on both sides of the street.
    The meeting will begin with a social period at 6 p.m., followed by a brief business meeting and dinner at 6:25 p.m.
    The presentation will begin at about 7:15 p.m. The Military Order of the World Wars dinner meetings are open to interested citizens for the dinner and program with RSVP, or the program only at no cost. The cost of the dinner is $25 per person.
    Call Eleanor Pinyan, 672-3750 for reservations. A reservation is a commitment to pay. Dinner is scheduled to be Smokin Bear BBQ with appropriate sides.

  • TODAY
    Nature Yoga and Trail Run
at 10:30 a.m. at the Nature Center. Practice yoga with Christa Tyson at the nature center, where you have a great view of nature. Optional: Arrive at 10:30 a.m. to join Christa for a pre-yoga run. Admission: yoga or run for $7/$5 for members; yoga and run for $12/$8 for members.

    Feature Film: From Earth to the Universe at 2 p.m. at the Nature Center.
Enjoy 180 degrees of entertainment. Join us on a colorful and inspiring journey through our universe. Cost is $6 for adults, $4 for children. More information at peecnature.org.
    MONDAY
    The New Mexico Alzheimer’s Association will offer a one-hour session from 1-2 p.m. on July 17 in the lower level classroom of the Betty Ehart Senior Center. The session will focus on the early stages of Alzheimer’s to include symptoms, coping strategies for caregivers and resources to help families who are challenged with dementia. For more information, contact David Davis 505-473-1297 or dldavis@alz.org.

    Nature Playtimes, Sponsored by Blue Cross Blue Shield of NM at 10 a.m. at the Nature Center.
Join local families for fun, hands-on activities, hikes, games, and stories in nature. Free. More information at peecnature.org.
    TUESDAY

  • Summer time in Texas means more time to play outside, go swimming, and soak up the sun. However, warmer temperatures also mean that pets may be more susceptible to heat exhaustion or heat stroke. To help pet owners avoid these risks, Dr. Stacy Eckman, clinical assistant professor at the Texas A&M College of Veterinary Medicine & Biomedical Sciences, offered some insight.
    “Heat stroke and heat exhaustion are major problems for pets in the summer, especially in short nosed breeds, such a pug or a bulldog,” Eckman said.  “These conditions can occur during hot and humid days and even cooler days, if your pets aren’t accustomed to the heat.”

    Heat exhaustion is the early stages of a heat stroke and causes lethargy, vomiting, and weakness. Following continued exercise or exposure to heat, Eckman said a heat stroke can occur with more severe signs, including extreme lethargy, vomiting, diarrhea, and pale mucous membranes.  This can lead significant problems up to and including death if not recognized and treated immediately.

  • The Colorado River, one of the longest rivers in the United States, is gradually shrinking. This is partly a result of overuse by municipalities and seasonal drought. The other reason is global warming.

    The decline in the river reservoir will have serious implications for large U.S. cities, such as Los Angeles, that depend on the Colorado River as their water source. In addition, this will also have an impact on the Native American tribes who view the Colorado River as sacred to their religions.

    As Ka-Voka Jackson, a member of the Hualapai tribe and a graduate student working to address climate change on the Colorado River and restoring native plant species along its banks, stated, “The Colorado River is so sacred not just to my tribe, but to so many others.”

    As a scholar of Native American religions and the environment, I understand how indigenous people’s religions and sacred places are closely tied to their landscape. For the past 100 years, indigenous peoples have been forced to adapt to changes in their environments and modify their religious rituals in the United States. The U.S. government made certain Native American religious practices illegal in the 19th and early 20th century. Although these policies have since been rescinded, they led to changes in many indigenous practices.  

  • The Jemez Mountains Bear Paw Quilt Guild invites the community to their annual Quilt Show.
    Come see a dazzling display of quilts, including the Patriotic Fallen Warrior Quilts given to New Mexico families that have lost a soldier in the Middle East.
    A selection of quilts and handmade items will also be available for sale (cash only).
    Admission is free. The event takes place July 21-23. Friday and Saturday the show will run 9:30 a.m.-5 p.m. On Sunday, the show will run 9:30 a.m.-4 p.m. It takes place at the Walatowa Visitor Center, 7413 Hwy 4.
     

  • Artist and instructor Lisa Coddington is returning to teach a one-day workshop on drawing using botanical and natural subjects at the Los Alamos Nature Center on July 20. This class, made possible by Pajarito Environmental Education Center (PEEC), is great for all skill levels. The workshop will run from 10 a.m. to 2:30 p.m. Register to learn techniques for creating realistic, still life, and nature-inspired art.

    Participants will explore pencil techniques that portray plants and animals. With easy to understand demonstrations and master artist examples, Lisa will work to reinforce confidence in creating dimensional, summer-themed subjects. Her next class will take place on July 27th and will feature painting and watercolor techniques.

    Coddington earned her Master of Art in Illustration at Syracuse University. She has illustrated a children’s book and has received commissions by regional and national firms for her artwork and art instruction. Her whimsical characters have been licensed for ornaments and are also featured on greeting cards.

  • This Sunday will mark the 71st anniversary of the Trinity Test, the first test  of an actual nuclear weapon. The test took place in the Jornada Del Muerto Desert near Alamogordo, New Mexico.

    At Fuller Lodge this weekend, the birth of the atomic bomb will be remembered in an hour and a half, thought-provoking performance that will include poetry by former Los Alamos native Allison Cobb, art by Japanese artist Yukiyo Kawano and dance by Butoh dancer Meshi Chavez. Stephen Miller and Lisa DeGrace will be providing the music and visual effects.

    The performance will actually center around the Aug. 9 bombing of Nagasaki, Japan, when the plutonium “Fat Man” bomb was dropped. Kawano created a replica of the Fat Man bomb from World War II era kimonos sewn together with Kawano’s hair. She has grandparents that survived the Hiroshima bombing on Aug. 6. The kimonos came from a shop owned by one of her grandmothers.

    The event is sponsored in part by the LA History museum.

    “When viewed together, the multiple perspectives from Los Alamos and Japan creates a more holistic history than what can be understood from only one point of view,” LA History Museum Director Judith Stauber said. 

  • I am loving summer, I hope you are too.

    I love the way things slow down, even though lately I haven’t seemed to get anything extra done.

    I hope you plan to participate in the Los Alamos County 100 Aha Moments photo contest. If you aren’t much of a contest participant, but like taking photographs, give it a try and support a new idea.

    Check out the County’s Instagram page, shoot a photo of your own and post it with the #100AHAMoments. The number sign for our young generation is called a “Hashtag,” and while I try not to be judgmental someone actually named their child that about a year ago. He isn’t reading yet and the family doesn’t live here, so I feel safe in sharing the story.

    I am not an Instagram kinda person, but I may give it a whirl as I do like to photograph almost anything.

    Last weekend I photographed a lot of local activities as we try and take advantage of all fun, free things while our company is visiting.

    This is an excellent time to just relax with some fun, new summer television shows too.

  • The recent rains have brought out a variety of different flowers, transitioning our landscape into the colors of summer. Pajarito Environmental Education Center’s Jemez Mountain Herbarium curator Chick Keller will lead this year’s Wildflower Walks. These monthly outings will be easy walks to identify some of the wildflower beauties found in and around Los Alamos. Each time Keller will pick a different trail, depending on what is blooming at the time. The walks are free and there is no advance registration required.
    The Wildflower Walks will take place one Monday a month for the season. Since he wasn’t able to lead a walk in June, there will be one more walk in July on July 24.
    Wildflower Walks will meet on Aug. 14 and then again on Sept. 11. Participants will receive a plant list and that, along with instruction from Keller, will help them learn how to identify wildflowers currently blooming in Los Alamos. The group will meet each month at 5:30 p.m. at the Los Alamos Nature Center, at 2600 Canyon Road, to carpool to the trailhead.  
    For more information, visitpeecnature.org, email programs@peecnature.org or call 662-0460.
     

  • Visitors and locals driving up NM 475 (the road to the Santa Fe Ski Basin) may notice something happening with aspen groves that create one of the most popular vistas on the Santa Fe National Forest.

    To the casual observer, the aspens may appear to be dying. But those bare branches signal the return of the western tent caterpillars, native defoliators whose larvae feed on a variety of hardwood trees species. At least here in New Mexico, they seem to be particularly fond of aspen.

    The caterpillar gets its name from the conspicuous “tent” it builds on branches and twigs. The silken shelter protects the larvae during molting. As they mature, the larvae disperse and continue feeding on leaves until it’s time to retreat into cocoons for their transformation into moths. The process takes a couple months after which the adults mate and the female moths lay the eggs that become next year’s caterpillars.

  • BY ROBERTA R. FINE
    Special to the Monitor

    Jemez House Inc. Thrift Store is rounding out its 21st year as a community and youth resource. Thanks to the generosity of its donors, it is facing growing pains and must make some hard decisions, again asking the community for its cooperation and forbearance.

    It has become an eyesore and a thorn in county management’s side due to unmanageable donations left on the store’s porch during off hours.

    The organization is an outgrowth of a group home for troubled or neglected children founded by a pastor of the United Church of Los Alamos. When the group home closed in 1996, due to new state requirements that were too expensive for it to meet, one of the thrift stores that helped to support it remained open.

  •  Coro de Cámara will welcome the Princeton Girlchoir’s advanced touring ensemble to Los Alamos on its first concert stop of a summer Southwest tour July 11 at the United Church in Los Alamos, with acclaimed Princeton Girlchoir, Artistic Director Dr. Lynnel Joy Jenkins and Pianist Ryan Brechmacher.
    The two choruses will participate in an afternoon workshop together and will present a 7 p.m. concert called, “A Choral Tapestry” at the 2525 Canyon Road, Los Alamos.
    The “Choral Tapestry” program weaves together a rich texture of musical styles and colors, including spirituals, pieces by notable living composers, and global selections. 
    The performance will include 43 singers, three conductors, two pianists, a viola and percussion.
    Each chorus will present its own delightful set of music and will then share several exciting works together.
    Janet Westrick, who founded PGC in 1989 and now lives in Santa Fe, will make a guest conducting appearance.
    State Rep. Stephanie Garcia Richard will welcome the audience and introduce PGC.
    Donations will be gratefully accepted at the door. Suggested amount: $20 adults, $10 students.
    After the performance, you can meet the musicians and enjoy light refreshments.

  • Outdoor enthusiasts are reminded that four-wheelers, all-terrain vehicles (ATVs) or utility vehicles (UTVs) and all off-road vehicles of any kind are prohibited within designated wilderness areas.
    This past weekend, ATV tracks were observed within the San Pedro Parks Wilderness on the Coyote Ranger District of the Santa Fe National Forest (SFNF).   San Pedro Parks is one of the original wilderness areas created by the Wilderness Act of 1964, which set aside “primeval” federal land.
    Wilderness areas generally do not allow motorized equipment, motor vehicles, mechanical transport, temporary roads or permanent structures.  These restrictions also apply to the Chama River Canyon Wilderness, the Dome Wilderness and the Pecos Wilderness on the SFNF, part of the more than 106 million acres of federal lands that have been set aside as wilderness.
    Law enforcement officers will be patrolling over the upcoming Fourth of July holiday and the summer. Violators will be cited, and their off-road vehicles will be impounded.
    Visitors should refer to the Motor Vehicle Use Maps (MVUM) to determine which SFNF roads, trails and areas are open to motorized use. For more information, go to fs.usda.gov/detail/santafe/landmanagement/projects/?cid=stelprdb5411664.

  • James M. Boncella, deputy group leader in Los Alamos National Laboratory’s Inorganic, Isotope and Actinide Chemistry group, has been selected as a 2017 Fellow in the American Chemical Society (ACS).

    The ACS Fellows Program recognizes members who have both made exceptional scientific contributions and who have provided excellent volunteer service to the ACS community.

    Boncella was selected as Fellow for his seminal discoveries in actinide chemistry and for his long and distinguished history of service to the ACS, including serving as Chair of the Division of Inorganic Chemistry.

    His research in actinide organometallic chemistry led to the discovery of the [bis(imido)U(VI)]2+  ion, which is the nitrogen analogue of the uranyl ion (UO2) 2+.

    This discovery has in turn led to the recent discovery of a neptunium compound (with A. J. Gaunt) which is the first example of a transuranic compound with a metal-ligand multiple bond with a ligand other than oxide.

    The actinide research has helped to redefine and solidify the role of covalent interactions in actinide chemistry.

  • Christina Wildau from Albuquerque was crowned Mrs. New Mexico June 24 at the African American Performing Arts Center in Albuquerque.

    Delegates from all over the state of New Mexico competed for the coveted crown.

    Along with wining the prestigious title, Wildau also won the Best in Evening Gown and Most Photogenic Awards.

    Wildau also won a prize package valued at over $8,000. She will advance on to compete at the national Mrs. America Pageant in August in Las Vegas, Nevada

    Award winners also included: Best in Swimsuit, Savanah Ray, Mrs San Juan County; Director’s Choice Award Winner, Ashley Lynch, Mrs Central NM; Mrs. Congeniality Award Winner, Brooke Maheng, Mrs. Ruidoso.