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Features

  • Los Alamos ScienceFest has expanded to more than a full week of mind-blowing demonstrations, interactive activities, art and discussions for inquisitive minds of all ages. The festival is from Sept. 5–13.  The majority of the festival activities are free and open to the public. The festival was formerly known as the Next Big Idea.
    Festival highlights include an appearance by former shuttle astronaut and Los Alamos National Laboratory employee John Phillips, drone demonstrations and giveaways, photography exhibition of early work by Berlyn Brixner, Detonography art, 3-D chalk artist, Rocket Day and Expo Day, among many others.
    In addition, live music concerts will take place on both Fridays of the festival from 7–10 p.m. courtesy of the Los Alamos Summer Concert Series.
    
“Los Alamos is a place of world changing ideas. Los Alamos ScienceFest celebrates this and explores how science lies at the heart of everything through an entertaining and engaging series of events, exhibitions and happenings,” said Suzette Fox, executive director of Los Alamos MainStreet.
    ScienceFest features nine days of interactive demonstrations, workshops, hands-on activities and dynamic speakers to engage in thought provoking discussion and even includes a few big nights out.”

  • The Los Alamos Historical Society will host an evening under the stars starting at 6:15 p.m. Sept. 5 at Fuller Lodge. The fundraising event, which is black-tie optional, will include a three-course dinner, the society’s annual Experience Auction and dancing to the music of the Los Alamos Big Band.
    Tickets are $75 each, and many of the 120 available have already been sold. Only a few ticket remain for an exclusive pre-party wine and cheese reception, which begins at 5:30 p.m. at the Hans Bethe House on Bathtub Row. Tickets for both the gala and reception are $125. The public can also take advantage of the opportunity to meet and speak with the first recepient of the annual Los Alamos History Award.
    Tickets are available through the Historical Society’s website at losalamoshistory.org (click on the link to the gala on the right side of the screen) or by check to P.O. Box 43 in Los Alamos. Reservations must be made by Friday.

  • Dawn Brown of Big Brothers Big Sisters of Northern New Mexico spends a good deal of time during the summer thinking of the new school year and the number of students that could use an adult friend in their life.
    “As the Los Alamos Rio Arriba regional director I reach out to the communities for volunteers, youth for our program, regional board development, public speaking engagements, PR, fundraising and event planning,” Brown said.
    Brown oversees the site-based and community-based programs, which match “bigs” and “littles” for as little as 45 minutes per week or up to six to eight hours per month.
    The one-to-one mentorship programs only vary in the amount of time an adult is available to mentor a local youth. The Northern New Mexico BBBS program offers training, and works hard to match adults and youth based on common goals and activities.
    These relationships help to build a child’s skills, confidence and increase the chances of them staying in school,” Brown said. “A positive role model in a youth’s life helps increase the chances that a child will be able to overcome adversity and lead a successful life.”
    Brown also wants volunteers to know that the relationships are nurtured and supported by their degreed and professionally trained program staff.

  •  

    Today

    A chapter of The Compassionate Friends will meet on the fourth Tuesday of each month at 7 p.m. to 8:30 p.m. on the northeast side of the new YMCA Annex, Central Park Square, suite 140. Co-led by Eric Ferm and Valerie Wood. The organization offers non-denominational grief support after the death of a child. Bereaved parents and grandparents are welcome regardless of age. For more information visit compassionatefriends.org. 

     

    The Great Books discussion group is now called Mesa Readers. The group meets from 1 to 3:30 p.m. on the second and fourth Tuesdays of each month at Mesa Public Library. The group chooses selections that interest its members and selects books and short stories that meet participants’ choices. All are welcome. For more information, call Mary Cernicek at 662-7100.

  •  

    As we come to the time for open house at the high school and middle school levels, I encourage you to attend and see everything the sites have available.

    On occasion, I hear parents say that they have attended them in the past and know everything they need to know about the schools.

    As each student is different, there is so much new to learn about, things to see and people to meet.

    If you haven’t been to the middle school yet, you are in for a treat. You’ll have a chance to roam the halls and see how much has truly changed for the Hawks.

    The high school has so much in store too, new staff members, new programs and so much to offer students each and every year.

  •  

    Mexico is one of the most biologically and culturally diverse countries in the world. These two categories, culture and nature, have gone hand-in-hand throughout history in Mexico: nature being fundamental to Mexican cultural development, and vice versa. There will be a free presentation 7 p.m. Wednesday at the Pajarito Environmental Education Center. 

    Two interns from Mexico, currently working at Bandelier, will take you back in time for an overview of how Mexican culture has changed throughout the years in its relationship with nature. The presentation will explore the impact of modern society on biodiversity, as well as outline some recent conservation efforts to save the natural beauty of Mexico.

  • The Los Alamos Animal Shelter, 226 East Road, 662-8179, has a great selection of adoptable pets just waiting for their forever home, so come adopt a new best friend today! Be sure to check out the Petfinder website for pictures of all adorable adoptable animals:
    petfinder.com/shelters/friendsoftheshelter.html
    SHELTER HOURS: Noon to 6 p.m. Monday – Friday and 10 a.m. to 1 p.m. weekends.
    Also, be sure to check out the website at lafos.org, to get more information about volunteering, adopting and donating, as well as read up on some of your favorite animals and learn more about special needs animals or cats and dogs currently in foster care.
    All adoptable pets are microchipped, spayed or neutered, and up-to-date on vaccinations.
    CATS
    George, Abby and Maddie — They are older and declawed, who were surrendered when their owner’s health prevented her from keeping them. The shelter is working on getting to know them, so keep an eye out. The shelter hopes they will be sent out together if possible — $35 for two or $70 for all three!

  • ALBUQUERQUE – Three University of New Mexico School of Medicine students completed their first year in medical school this summer by helping Los Alamos residents with their health and wellness through mid-August at two sites in Los Alamos that include a family medicine clinic and medical center.
    More than 100 first-year UNM medical students began their six-week rural rotation this month in 22-plus communities throughout New Mexico, from Las Vegas to Las Cruces; Gallup to Clovis.
    As part of their nationally recognized curriculum, the students are talking with patients, conducting physical examinations with their preceptors, and performing a community project designed to address specific community health care and/or educational needs.
    Through the UNM School of Medicine’s Practical Immersion Experience (PIE), medical students are placed in outlying primary care practices — predominantly family medicine practices, but also internal medicine practices and occasionally rural emergency rooms — to experience medical practice in New Mexico’s rural communities.

  • Several robotics teams from Los Alamos gathered at the Bradbury Science Museum on Friday to show off their handmade robots. In attendance were Project Y from Los Alamos High School, FIRST Robotics team from UNM-LA, FIRST Lego Atomic Phoenixes, FIRST Tech Challenge from Los Alamos Middle School and the Radioactive Fireflies. 

  • The Julie’s Helpers Memorial Scholarship Committee recently announced the recipients of the fourth annual scholarships, given to Navajo women who desire to serve their community and need help funding a challenging academic course of study.
    The recipient of this year’s $2,500 Julie’s Helpers Memorial Scholarship is Markie Bee, who is a senior at New Mexico Tech in Socorro.
    Bee is a single mom of a 3-year-old son, Orion Vicenti. “Being a single mom…it is a big relief getting any financial help,” she said.
    Bee is from Fruitland, a community between Shiprock and Farmington. She is working on receiving her bachelor’s degree in chemical engineering with plans to graduate in May. She hopes to serve the Navajo tribe by working with oil and gas industries to ensure more efficient processes and minimalize environmental damage to Indian Country. Her future plans are to achieve a master’s degree and return to Farmington to pursue a career in the petroleum industry.
    According to a press release, Bee has a passion for chemistry and has volunteered through the American Indian Science and Engineering Society (AISES) to encourage other Native American youth to pursue college degrees. She will be the first in her family to graduate from college.

  • The public can see and drive a variety of different robots at “Robotics Night” from 5 to 8 p.m., Friday at the Bradbury Science Museum. Robots from Los Alamos National Laboratory’s Hazardous Devices Team, the FIRST Robotics Clubs (high school and middle-school students), University of New Mexico-Los Alamos, First LEGO League and other local robotics enthusiasts are scheduled to be at the museum.
    Activities take place inside the downtown museum and in the surface parking outside adjacent to Central Avenue.
    Attendees can watch demonstrations on how the robots work and ask questions of robot operators. Also featured will be Sumo Bot battles. The Sumo robots are autonomous, battery-powered and controlled by an Arduino or a similar processor. Competitors will battle to push each other out of the ring with only their sensors and programming to guide them.
    For more information, visit lanl.gov/museum/events/happening-now.shtml.
     

  • Los Alamos
    East Park Pool Snack Bar, 111 East Road
    Date inspected: June 23
    Violations: One high-risk violation. Sanitizer at too high of concentration, which was corrected at time of inspection. Two moderate-risk violations. Thermometer needed inside refrigerator. Test strips needed for sanitizer.
    Status of Establishment: Approved. No follow up required.

    S-Site Café, TA-16, SM-192
    Date inspected: June 23
    Violations: None.
    Status of Establishment: Approved. No follow up required.

    Film Festival at Home, 3801 Arkansas Ave.
    Date inspected: June 23
    Violations: One low-risk violation. Restroom self closing device on door needs to work properly.
    Status of Establishment: Approved. No follow up required.

  • Auto enthusiasts will
    emerge for Autumn Run

  • The Drury Plaza Hotel in Santa Fe is now officially open for business.
    “We have had a successful week welcoming our first group of guests,” said Tauseen Malik, general manager of the Drury Plaza Hotel in Santa Fe. “The feedback has been very positive, especially about our spacious, light-filled rooms and our great, friendly staff.  We pride ourselves on hospitality and for the ninth consecutive year, Drury Hotels has ranked in the top slot for Highest in Guest Satisfaction Among Mid-Scale Hotel Chains by J.D. Power. We are proud to be bringing that top service to Santa Fe.”
     The Drury Plaza Hotel in Santa Fe will be hosting numerous events this year. The hotel recently hosted the Women’s International Study Center’s symposium, with more than 300 panelists, including Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg. The hotel will also host to Santa Fe’s inaugural cyclocross event on Sept. 20.

  • Severe weather struck many times earlier this month as monsoon season started. A representative from the National Weather Service recently held a class at the Pajarito Environmental Education Center to conduct a SKYWARN™ Weather Spotter class.
    Meteorologists from the NWS taught the basics of severe local storms, to include thunderstorms, flash floods, downburst winds, tornadoes and more. They also spoke of NWS operations, important safety information and how to stay prepared.
    During the class, participants had the chance to talk to NWS representatives about becoming an official SKYWARN™ Weather Spotter.
    Weather spotters are the “eyes and ears” of the NWS and provide valuable weather reports. Those interested often include citizens, amateur radio operators, CERT and Citizen
Corps personnel, law enforcement, fire, transportation and public works staff. Spotter reports, coupled with radar, satellite and other data, has enabled the NWS to issue more timely and accurate warnings and statements for types of hazardous weather.

  • As the Holocaust and Intolerance Museum of New Mexico comes of age, it’s honoring children who never got the chance.
    Marking 13 years of advocating tolerance, the museum celebrates its Bar Mitzvah year remembering the 1.5 million children murdered under the Nazi regime, many of whom didn’t live to see their own coming of age.
    The museum board invites the public to join special event and reception, 2 p.m. Sunday, in Congregation B’nai Israel, 4401 Indian School, NE, in Albuquerque.
    “We dedicate our Bar Mitzvah year remembering the innocents who met a cruel and senseless death brought on by hate and intolerance,” said Jerry Small, a museum representative. “We must never forget in order to end these atrocities that continue even today in countries ravaged by war.”
    During World War II, Adolf Hitler’s army and collaborators killed more than a million Jewish children, tens of thousands of Romani (Gypsy) children, German youth with physical and mental disabilities, Polish children, and innocents residing in the occupied Soviet Union, according to the United States Holocaust Memorial Museum. The chances for survival for Jewish and some non-Jewish adolescents (13-18 years old) were greater, only because they could be deployed at forced labor.

  • Tickets are now on sale for the High Tea and Fashion Show. The show starts at 3 p.m. Aug. 30 at at Trinity on the Hill Episcopal Church, 2900 Trinity Drive in Kelly Hall. Fashions will be available for sale from Shop on the Corner, the Trinity on the Hill thrift shop. There will also be a silent auction with handmade items, gift certificates, time and talent donations and more. Tickets are $25, children 10 and under $10. Advance ticket purchases are recommended. To buy tickets call 662-5107.  
    All proceeds go to support two house building mission trips to Ciudad Juárez, Mexico this fall, one in October (House of Hope Women), one in November (Trinity Builders, co-ed team).
    The House of Hope and Trinity Builders house-building mission teams are sponsors for the fifth annual fundraising event.
    Just as last year, decorated tables, adorned with place settings and fresh flowers, will be the setting for the tea and homemade food items will be provided by team members and volunteers.
    Cups of tea will be served from “bottomless” teapots that will include black teas as well as a variety of herbal and flavored teas. Afternoon hats are encouraged and will certainly generate some lively conversation as friends chat and make new acquaintances at round tables of eight settings each.

  • Los Alamos County Library System has acquired the online resource National Geographic Virtual Library, which brings the world to any computer.
    The National Geographic magazine offers photographs and articles, ethnographic and cultural information, superb maps and serious scholarship. The complete archive of National Geographic magazine since 1888 is available now.
    This collection includes the National Geographic magazine and the National Geographic Traveler, as well as hundreds of books, maps, videos and images. A library card will give you unlimited access to:
    • National Geographic magazine Archive, 1888-1994
    • National Geographic magazine Archive, 1995-Current
    • National Geographic: People, Animals and the World
    • National Geographic Kids
    The online National Geographic is searchable by general topic, such as “The Environment,” “People and Cultures,” or “Animals,” as well as by story or magazine editions.

  • Los Alamos Middle School recently won a grant to hold a district wide poster contest to promote Keep New Mexico Beautiful (KNMB) that helped promote the local summer reading program. The posters were on display at Mesa Public Library while winners were selected from the entries. Chamisa art teacher, Renee Mitsunaga’s class had several submissions.

  • Dem meeting

    As a follow-up to Valerie Plame’s visit last week supporting Stephanie Garcia Richard, the movie Fair Game about her outing as a CIA operative by the Bush administration will be shown at 7 p.m. today at the Democrat Headquarters (next to Quiznos). An info session discussing volunteer opportunities will be at 6:15. All Democrats are welcome to come.

    Blood drive

    A blood drive will be held Aug. 21 and Aug. 22 at the First Baptist Church on Diamond Drive. Hours will be 11 a.m. to 7 p.m. Aug. 21 and 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. Aug. 22. To sign up, call United Blood Services at 877-UBS-HERO or 505 246-1457.

    GOP meeting

    The Republican Party of Los Alamos will hold its monthly meeting at 7 p.m. Thursday at the UNM-LA Wallace Hall, Room 505. The program will be a forum on the proposed charter change to restructure county utilities. Advocates both for and against will present their cases and respond to questions. A regular business meeting will follow. The public is welcome. For more information, call Robert Gibson, 662-3159.

    Concert

     Tuesdays at the Pond Series. 7 p.m. today at Ashley Pond. Bronach Celtic Blues Band and the Belisama Dance group will perform.