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Features

  • Melissa Savage, the author of “Rio: a Photographic Journey down the Old Rio Grande,” will speak at 7 p.m. at Mesa Public Library Thursday.
    Savage is a conservationist, geographer, professor emerita with UCLA, and director of the Four Corners Institute in Santa Fe. Her book is comprised of historical photographs of the Rio Grande, which are accompanied by essays written by people who are closely associated with the history of the river.
    UNM Press describes the book as: “The dynamic Río Grande has run through all the valley’s diverse cultures: Puebloan, Spanish, Mexican and Anglo. Photography arrived in the region at the beginning of the river’s great transformation by trade, industry and cultivation. In RIO, Melissa Savage has collected images that document the sweeping history of that transformation – from those of 19th-century expeditionary photographer W. H. Jackson to the work of the great 20th-century chronicler of the river, Laura Gilpin.”
    The Authors Speak program at Mesa Public Library provides a unique opportunity to meet prominent authors from the region. The readings and conversations take place on the fourth Thursday of each month, upstairs at Mesa Public Library. The Authors sell and sign books after the talks.

  • By Mandy Marksteiner

    Marksteiner:  How did you first come up with the idea for LAMOA?

    Tatter: My mother was living in a condo in Los Alamos and one of her neighbors was a gentleman who had an incredible art collection. He had been collecting for a long time and was looking for a place to put it.

    Los Alamos needs to have this place where these collections can go. There’s a scientific history here that has been well documented, but there's a cultural history that goes along with this of art and artists who've been here from the beginning.                                                                                                              

  • Join Ming Franz, an International Artist Magazine's recent grand prize winner, will teach a splash color workshop at the Fuller Lodge Art Center this weekend.

    The class will be from 9:30 a.m.-4:40 p.m. Saturday and Sunday.

    Beginning with ancient black-and-white splash, the class will evolve into marbling splash and then abstract splash using liquid watercolor, acrylic, and Asian ink.

    The foundation of this painting process is based on principles originating in Tang Dynasty China with a technique, known as PoMo. Essentially the artist freely "splashes" liquid color onto stacks of dampened sheets of mulberry paper. After the sheets dry, they are separated and the real magic begins.

  • National Kick Butts Day activities will be Wednesday at Los Alamos High School.
    The LAPS Prevention Office is working with the Campaign for Tobacco Free Kids to encourage young people to kick the habit or to avoid using tobacco.
    The high school Robotics Department and the Art Department have created a visual display to “Destroy Tobacco” which will take place during lunch-time activities.
    Free tobacco cessation programs are also available for students and staff members and information can be accessed by calling Bernadette Lauritzen in the Prevention Office at 663-3252.

  • Feb. 21 — A boy. Ira Daniel Weis. Born to Danielle Hauck and Eric Weis.
    Feb. 22 — A boy. Jared Smidt. Born to Esther and Joe Smidt.
    Feb. 25 —A girl. Ginny Lynn Williams. Born to Anna and Dwigth Williams.
    March 3 — A girl. Olivia Lake Parish. Born to Amanda Babicke and Mychael Parish.

  • “Fresh Out” is a 12-minute comedy by local playwright, Robert F. Benjamin. The comedy will be performed by Pat Beck and Kate Ramsey at 12:45 p.m. Wednesday at the Betty Ehart Senior Center. The performance is free and will include a “talkback” after the show.
    “Fresh Out” is a wacky, evocative comedy. Since Ruby, who is in her late 60s, became a widow several years ago, she’s had several brief romances. When another fling is about to collapse, she is at a crossroads. Should she continue to wallow in regrets about failed romances or embrace a new perspective on late-in-life companionship? Can Ruby become energized to take on a fresh approach to courtship? Of what use are regrets, anyway? What can seniors do about regrets?

  • The LAPS Healthy Schools Initiative invites parents, teachers, and community members to join a Community Book Read sponsored by 100+ Women Who Care and the Los Alamos Public Schools Foundation.
    LAPS staff meet regularly in professional learning circles to read and discuss the latest developments in educational research and practice. These book groups have been supported by the LAPS Foundation and other generous funders. The Healthy Schools Initiative is offering this opportunity to the community.
    The first selection is the book “How to Raise an Adult: Break Free of the Overparenting Trap and Prepare Your Kid for Success by Julie Lythcott-Haims.” Having spent 10 years as Stanford University’s Dean of Freshmen, Lythcott-Haims served as an advocate for young adults.
    In her work and her personal life, the author saw first-hand how our best intentions can prevent children from developing the skills they need to thrive, she said. The book includes a discussion of the pitfalls of overhelping our children as well as practical suggestions for raising resilient adults.

  • The Los Alamos Animal Shelter, 226 East Road, 662-8179, has a great selection of adoptable pets just waiting for their forever home, so come adopt your new best friend today! All adoptable pets are microchipped, spayed or neutered, and up-to-date on vaccinations. Shelter hours are noon – 6 p.m. Monday through Friday, 11 a.m.–4 p.m. Saturday, and noon–3 p.m. Sunday.
    Be sure to check out the website at lafos.org, to get more information about volunteering, adopting and donating. Also check out Petfinder website for pictures of adoptable animals: petfinder.com/shelters/friendsoftheshelter.html.
    CATS
    Mr. Whiskers—A big tabby cat that is about 4 years old. Changes are a bit stressful for him, so he will likely need a little bit of time to adjust to his new home. He can be independent, but he’s also very sweet and likes to snuggle when he’s in the mood! He is okay with mellow cats, but other dominant males sometimes bother him.
    Lemon —A sweet older cat that was left at the front door of the shelter with no information or history. Lemon is in foster care receiving treatment for diabetes; her foster home reports that they call her Sugar, since she’s so sweet! When Lemon is feeling better, she’ll be looking for a mellow home that is understanding of the needs of a diabetic cat.

  • March 12-18
    For information, call the Betty Ehart Senior Center (BESC) at 662-8920, the White Rock Senior Center (WRSC) at 672-2034 and “Day Out” (adult day care, 8 a.m.-4 p.m.) at 661-0081. Reservations: by 10 a.m. for lunches.
    Betty Ehart

    MONDAY    
    8:45 a.m.        Cardio
    8:30 a.m.        Tax Preparation
    9:45 a.m.        Pilates
    11:30 a.m.        Lunch: Soft Beef Taco
    6 p.m.        Argentine Tango Dancing
    7 p.m.        Ballroom Dancing
    TUESDAY
    8:45 a.m.        Variety Training
    11:30 a.m.        Lunch: Frito Pie (Pi-Day)
    1 p.m.        Party Bridge
    7:30 p.m.        Table Tennis
    WEDNESDAY    
    8:30 a.m.–1 p.m.    LAVA Quilters
    8:30 a.m.        Tax Preparation
    8:45 a.m.        Cardio Plus
    10:30 a.m.        Music w/Ruth

  • TODAY
    Los Alamos Little Theatre’s “The Other Place” play shows at 2 p.m. at the Los Alamos Performance Center, 1670 Nectar St. This compelling drama centers on Juliana Smithton, a successful neurologist whose life seems to be coming unhinged.
    MONDAY
    The United Church of Los Alamos’s annual Mexico Mission live and silent auction. The church is looking for the donation of auction items to build homes for the poor during spring break. Auction items can include; art, jewelry, household items, gift certificates, services and more. Items can be left at the church during business hours and those with large items can request a pick up by calling 662-2971 and leaving your contact information. The United Church is located at 2525 Canyon Road.

    Feature Film: From Earth to the Universe at 2 p.m. at the Nature Center. Enjoy 180 degrees of entertainment. Join us on a colorful and inspiring journey through our universe. Cost is $6 for adults, $4 for children.
    TUESDAY
    Nature Playtimes, Sponsored by Blue Cross Blue Shield of NM from 10-11 a.m. at the Nature Center. Join local families for fun in nature. Free.

  • If you’ve noticed your pet’s eye lenses becoming cloudy or opaque, your pet could be developing cataracts.
    Though cataracts can decrease vision, or even cause complete blindness, not every companion animal that develops cataracts requires surgery. Dr. Lucien Vallone, clinical assistant professor at the Texas A&M College of Veterinary Medicine & Biomedical Sciences, explained how cataracts can affect pets.
    “A cataract is an opacity of the lens,” Vallone said. “A clear lens is necessary for good vision; thus, any opacification can cause decreased vision. However, not all cataracts are the same. Some cases of cataracts are so severe they can cause blindness and inflammation in the eye, which may cause significant discomfort. Some cases are small enough they don’t interfere with vision at all and should be monitored.”
    All companion animals can develop cataracts, but Vallone said cataracts are common in dogs. Several breeds of dogs may be predisposed to cataracts, though not every dog within these breeds are affected.

  • The Los Alamos Little Theatre’s production of “The Other Place” took home awards for outstanding leading actor, direction and set design at the New Mexico State Theatre Festival held in Las Cruces last weekend.
    The production placed second overall and is the alternate for a regional competition.  
    Cindy Hines was awarded the leading actor award for her portray of Julianna.  
    Director Gwen Lewis received the direction award and Paul Lewis received the set design award.  
    Other LALT participants in the festival included cast members Eric Bjorklund and Andi Bishofberger, cast member and stage manager Iain May, and backstage support Kelli Guider and Kathy Bjorklund.
    The festival is sponsored by Theatre New Mexico, and is a part of AACTFest, a national theatre competition sponsored by the American Association of Community Theatre that is held every two years.  Competition begins at the state level, advances to Regionals, and culminates in a national festival. LALT has participated in AACTFest for many years and has hosted the New Mexico festival on many occasions, most recently in 2013.

  • Los Alamos High School Symphonic Band and Band Director Zane Meek gave their all Monday at the North Central New Mexico Music Educators Association Band Music Performance Assessment.  
    The association uses the event to periodically assess high school and middle school bands in the association’s “Southwest District 1” for their musical ability and acumen. The event lasts all day, and includes dozens of schools from around the area. Schools in the association’s district take turns hosting the event.
    The main purpose of the event is to support students in their musical endeavors through feedback and constructive, positive critique.  

  • Think doing the laundry has to be a boring task that sucks up all of theprecious hours that could be spent relaxing? Say no more. “Film Festival,” Los Alamos’ go-to place for movie rentals and coffee, now offers a coin-op laundry service.
    The store has six washers and six dryers. Drying costs $1.25 a load and $2.75 for a wash, giving folks a $4 bargain that is somewhat less expensive that other laundromats “off the hill.”
    Leisure time-wise, it pays for itself in other ways, too.
    “There’s a TV back there so if you’re in the middle of March Madness you won’t miss anything,” co-owner Abbie Burk said. “We’re making it a quiet place for people, where they can get a coffee and wait it out.”
    For those who want to watch a movie, Film Festival has that aspect covered, as well.
    “We’re going to look at doing specials, where if someone brings in their laptop, they can get a reduced rental DVD for the time they’re in here”, Burk said.
    Burk and her husband Brad have owned and operated the store for 21 years, after taking it over from Gerry Washburn. Washburn went on to become a teacher, then assistant superintendent with the Los Alamos Public Schools. He left Los Alamos in 2015 to become a school superintendent in Roseburg, Oregon.

  • To accommodate the speaker, History On Tap has been rescheduled and will be from 5:30-7 p.m. March 21.  
    The speaker will be Ray Monk, author of “Robert Oppenheimer: A Life Inside the Center.” He has also written award-winning biographies of Ludwig Wittgenstein and Bertrand Russell. He is a Professor of Philosophy at the University of Southampton, with research interests in the history of analytic philosophy, the philosophy of mathematics, and philosophical issues arising from the practice of biography.
    History On Tap is part of the On Tap series presented by the Los Alamos Creative District and hosted by the Los Alamos Historical Society. It takes place at UnQuarked, 145 Central Park Square.

  • Emily Martens of Los Alamos, a freshman at the College of Liberal Arts has been named to the 2016 fall semester dean’s list at the University of Minnesota Twin Cities, the university announced last week.
    To qualify for the Dean’s List, a student must complete 12 or more letter-graded credits while attaining a 3.66 grade point average.

  • Today is the last day to nominate local businesses for the annual Chamber Awards.
    At the Chamber Gala on April 22, awards will be presented to Chamber Member Businesses who have been selected by their peers for their business performance in the past year.
    The Chamber is accepting nominations from Chamber members for Chamber member businesses and non-profits in the following categories:
    • Financial Institution of the Year
    • Most Innovative Business of the Year
    • Restaurant of the Year
    • Service Business of the Year (salon, computer repair, cleaners, etc.)
    • Retailer of the Year
    • Non-profit of the Year
    • Media Outlet of the Year
    • Overall Business of the Year
    Send nominations to Nancy@losalamos.org no later than 5 p.m. today.
    Tickets for the Gala are $100 and can be purchased on the Chamber events page losalamoschamber.chambermaster.com/events/details/chamber-gala-224.

  • Family Night at the Los Alamos Nature Center is March 14. Enjoy an evening of games and hands-on activities with Mesa Public Library’s Melissa Mackey from 6-7 p.m.
    The nature center will be open for exploring the exhibits until 8 p.m.
    Mark your calendars: the second Tuesday of each month is Family Night at the nature center.
    Thanks to a generous sponsorship from the Kiwanis Club of Los Alamos, this program is free for all.
    For more information about this and other programs offered by the Pajarito Environmental Education Center, visit peecnature.org, email programs@peecnature.org, or call 662-0460.

  • TODAY
    Gentle Walks at 9 a.m. at the Nature Center. A gentle walk for which the emphasis is on discovery, not mileage gained. Free. More information at peecnature.org.

    March Night Sky Show from 7-8 p.m. at the Nature Center. Discover and identify objects visible in our night sky this month. Cost is $6 for adults, $4 for children.

    Coro de Camara to perform at 7 p.m. at Crossroads Bible Church, 97 East Road in Los Alamos. Northern New Mexico’s premiere chamber chorus sings a Broadway concert with highlights from “Les Miserables” and a tribute to Stephen Sondheim. Tickets at the door are a suggested donation of $20 for adults and $10 for students. Visit corodecamara-nm.org.
    SATURDAY
    Saturday and Sunday: Drawing and Painting Natural Forms (2 day class) from 10:30 a.m.-4 p.m. at the Nature Center. Enjoy botanical drawing and watercolor with Santa Fe artist Lisa Coddington. Cost is $48 for members, $60 for non-members.

    Feature Film: “We are Stars” at 2 p.m. at the Nature Center. Cost is $6 for adults, $4 for children.
    SUNDAY
    Feature Film: “We are Stars” at 2 p.m. at the Nature Center. Cost is $6 for adults, $4 for children.

  • Summit Garden Club will hold its monthly meeting at 1:30 p.m. Monday at the White Rock Library, and will feature a talk and slide show on the flora and fauna of Mongolia.  
    Summit member Bev Cooper and her husband Martin traveled to Mongolia in the Summer of 2015 with the goal of seeing white neck cranes, demoiselle cranes, argali sheep an ibex.  
    The Coopers saw all of these, and experienced a new culture. The public is welcome to attend the talk.
    Also, White Rock Library Director Veronica Encinas will speak about the development and implementation of the plan to landscape the White Rock Library and Teen Center area in a way that would use native plants for greenery and use water wisely.
    For more information, call Shelby at 662-2625.