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Features

  • April 2-8
    For information, call the Betty Ehart Senior Center (BESC) at 662-8920, the White Rock Senior Center (WRSC) at 672-2034 and “Day Out” (adult day care, 8 a.m.-4 p.m.) at 661-0081. Reservations: by 10 a.m. for lunches.

    Betty Ehart

    MONDAY    
    8:45 a.m.        Cardio
    8:30 a.m.        Tax Preparation
    9:45 a.m.        Pilates
    10 a.m.        Senior Civic Discussion
    11:30 a.m.        Lunch: Fettuccine Chicken             Alfredo
    6 p.m.        Argentine Tango Dancing
    7 p.m.        Ballroom Dancing
    TUESDAY
    8:45 a.m.        Variety Training
    11:30 a.m.        Lunch: Salisbury Steak
    1 p.m.        Party Bridge
    1 p.m.        Party Bridge
    7:30 p.m.        Table Tennis
    WEDNESDAY    
    8:30 a.m.–1 p.m.    LAVA Quilters

  • The Los Alamos Animal Shelter, 226 East Road, (505) 662-8179, has a great selection of adoptable pets just waiting for their forever home, so come adopt your new best friend today! All adoptable pets are micro-chipped, spayed or neutered, and up-to-date on vaccinations. Shelter hours are 12–6 p.m. Monday through Friday, 11 a.m. – 4 p.m. Saturday, and 12–3 p.m. Sunday.

    Be sure to check out our website at lafos.org, where you can get more information about volunteering, adopting, and donating.

    CATS
     
    Mr. Whiskers—A big tabby cat that is about 4 years old. Changes are a bit stressful for him, so he will likely need a little bit of time to adjust to his new home. He can be independent, but he’s also very sweet and likes to snuggle when he’s in the mood! He is okay with mellow cats, but other dominant males sometimes bother him.
    Lemon—A sweet older cat that was left at the front door of the shelter with no information or history. Lemon is currently in foster care receiving treatment for diabetes; her foster home reports that they call her Sugar, since she’s so sweet! When Lemon is feeling better, she’ll be looking for a mellow home that is understanding of the needs of a diabetic cat.

  • TODAY
    Nature Yoga and Trail Run
from 10:30 a.m.-12:45 p.m. at the Nature Canter. Practice yoga with Christa Tyson at the nature center, where you have a great view of nature. Optional: Arrive at 10:30 a.m. to join Christa for a pre-yoga run. Cost for yoga or run for $7/$5 for members; yoga and run for $12/$8 for members.

    Feature Film: “Phantom of the Universe” from 7-7:45 p.m. at the Nature Center. Explore dark matter, from the Big Bang to its anticipated discovery at the Large Hadron Collider. Cost is $6 for adults, $4 for children.
     
    Gardening for Pollinators
from 1:30-3:30 p.m. at the Nature Center. Join Master Gardener Kate Whealen and learn to select plants that support pollinators. Registration required. Cost is $10 or $8 for members.
    MONDAY
    Sleep Matters/Sleep Apnea and Treatment presentation at 2 p.m. on the third floor at Aspen Ridge Assisted Living, 1010 Sombrillo Court. Presenters are Dr. Roger Wiggins and Patricia Donahue, respiratory therapist of the SW Sleep Center. Refreshments served. No RSVP is necessary.  Los Alamos community, residents and families invited. Call Cynthia Goldblatt, community liaison at 695-8981 for information.

  • National Crime Victim’s Week is this week.
    Community collaboration efforts will take place for educational opportunities throughout the week and culminate in resource booths at both Smith’s locations from 1-5 p.m. Friday.
    Project partners will be on hand to answer questions and hand out free t-shirts while supplies last.
    To learn more, contact the Los Alamos Police Department Victim’s Assistant at 663-3511. No police report required.
    To learn more, visit VictimsofCrime.org.

  • Los Alamos Pony Club will host nationally renowned equestrian trainer and instructor Robert Taylor over the weekend of April 8-9.
    Community members are welcome to come and observe the event or participate in the mounted activities.
    Taylor, of TaylorMade Stables in Maryland (taylormadestables.com/robert-taylor.html), will be in town to coach show jumping and mounted games competitors of all levels. This has become an annual event for local riders, who greatly enjoy Taylor’s gruff humor and superb training skills.
    Taylor has been a fixture in the show jumping, competitive driving, foxhunting and mounted games communities internationally for many years, and his daughter Mackenzie won the International Mounted Games Association World individual Championship under-17 in 2012.
    Morning sessions for the Los Alamos clinic will be at the jump arena (behind the main rodeo facility), and focus on jumping skills for horse and rider, and then each afternoon the club will set up for mounted games practice.
    Mounted games participants can sign up to participate even on the same day of the clinic. Both English and Western tack is permitted, as long as everyone has helmets and boots.
    Audience members are welcome at no charge, but are asked to leave dogs at home or keep them leashed at all times for safety.

  • This week, I feel like the column should be called, “It’s all about me,” and “It’s not about me at all.”
    Today starts the long, slow crawl to 50, and the previous year and a half has been a stressful time, to say the least.
    It has been a time to see what you’re made of, grab the bull by the horns and hold on for the ride.
    I’ve always had friends with children a year or two older than our children.
    I highly recommend it, because these little nuggets of wisdom can be stored, like a squirrel stores nuts and pulled out when you really need them.
    So the same might be true of having a friend that is a few years older than you. Perhaps it will help you see what’s ahead and perhaps at the same time, you don’t want to know.
    I had a friend that had already hit the magic age of 50. She had some health problems, but was battling through along the way.
    Then unexpectedly, she died in her sleep. Yep, 50 years old and gone overnight.
    My heart aches for her husband, because he’s just slightly younger than my husband and his life has been uprooted in a flash.

  • The Los Alamos Department of Public Utilities is bringing four speakers and a film to the Los Alamos Nature Center from 6:30 to 8:30 p.m. April 4.
    The evening will start with a discussion about rivers and local water issues by four speakers followed by a break with refreshments and a chance to meet the speakers. Afterward, they will show the documentary This event is free.
    The four talks are:
    • Where the water we use in Los Alamos comes from, with some thoughts on a sustainable future by Jack Richardson, Deputy Utilities Manager – Gas, Water, Sewer (GWS) for Los Alamos County.
    • The End of the Dam-building Era in the Western US by Steve Harris, Executive Director of Rio Grande Restoration.
    • Rethinking the Rio: the opportunity and challenge of moving low-elevation storage from Elephant Butte to high-elevation reservoirs on the Rio Chama to conserve water from evaporation and restore flows to an ailing river by Jen Pelz, Wild Rivers Program Director at WildEarth Guardians

  • TODAY
    Business After Hours hosted by New Mexico Bank & Trust 1475 Central Ave. from 5-7 p.m. For more information, visit losalamoschamber.org.
    THURSDAY
    Nature Yoga at 5:15 p.m. at the Nature Center. Practice yoga with Christa Tyson at the nature center. Cost is $15 for non-members, $12 for members. More information at peecnature.org
    FRIDAY
    Gentle Walks at 9 a.m. at the Nature Center. A gentle walk for which the emphasis is on discovery, not mileage gained. Free.

    Fish Fry Friday from 5-7 p.m. at Immaculate Heart Mary Parish Hall, 3700 Canyon Road. Cost is $10 for Adults, $7 for children.
    SATURDAY
    Bird Walk: Cañada Bonita from 7 a.m.-noon at the Nature Center.
Observe local birds while quietly hiking through conifer forests. Free for members, $5 for non-members.
     
    Rockhound Geology Outing: Driving Tour of the Pajarito Plateau
from 9-11:30 a.m. Enjoy a scenic drive from White Rock to the Valles Caldera with stops along the way to learn about the fascinating geology of the Pajarito Plateau from geologist Patrick Rowe. Cost is  $7 for individuals, $14 for families; $5 for PEEC member individuals; $11 for PEEC member families.
     

  • Art exhibits
    The National Museum of Nuclear Science and History, 601 Eubank SE in Albuquerque, will host “Critical Assembly, the Secrets of Los Alamos 1944: An Installation by American Sculptor Jim Sanborn,” through Oct. 8. This special exhibit, created by world renowned sculptor Jim Sanborn – best known for creating the encrypted “Kryptos” sculpture at CIA headquarters in Langley, Virginia – invites visitors to explore and study the recreations of the super secret experiments from the Manhattan Project’s atomic bomb program. The museum is open from 9 a.m.- 5 p.m., 361 days a year. For information, visit nuclearmuseum.org, or call 505-245-2137.

    “Oblique Views: Archaeology, Photography and Time.” Museum of Indian Arts and Culture, 710 Camino Lejo, Santa Fe. Photographer Adriel Heisey re-photographed some of Southwest’s most significant archeological sites that Charles Lindbergh and his wife, Anne, photographed in 1929. Exhibit runs through May.

  • In an ongoing effort to help students transition to the workforce, faculty at the University of New Mexico-Los Alamos regularly invite representatives from Los Alamos National Laboratory to campus to speak about opportunities at LANL.
    In late February, Deborah Martinez who works with LANL Human Resources on various engineering related programs, presented an overview of the LANL Institutional Technician Pipeline Job Program. The program provides training and development, as well as entry into career pathways.
    Martinez explained that Post Associates Internships are available for those who have earned an associates degree within the past three years but have little or no relevant experience. Employees will be provided with on-the-job training and mentoring with a senior technician or supervisor. The program is offered through a number of divisions, from Applied Engineering and Technology to the Weapons Systems Engineering division. The electro-mechanical degree program at UNM-LA is designed to prepare students for tech positions in these areas.
    After stating that LANL is looking for people who are adaptable, flexible team players eager to learn, Martinez continued with advice on writing a strong cover letter and a resume that reflects skills appropriate to the job.

  • By Debbie Stone

    Special to the Monitor

  • The Los Alamos Nature Center hosted a kickoff event for Everyone Does IT on March 21. This event focused on helping students of all ages learn about computing and information technology.  
    Tables filled with computers and props lined the building and created an interesting juxtaposition to the nature exhibits.
    The Nature Center was also filled with children and adults alike, eager to interact with the electronics available.
    Booth participants included VISIBLE VR Experience, Coder DOJO, Software is Everywhere, Dragon Dash! Photo Booth, Hacking Queen of the Hill, a Supercomputing Challenge, the Atomic Women and recruiting for Los Alamos National Laboratory.  
    Scientist Ambassador Terri Roberts ran the “Software is Everywhere” booth, which was stocked with intriguing gadgets that demonstrated the process of coding. During her explanation of basic computing principles, she said the first programmer was, in fact, a woman, Ada Lovelace.
    “Women need to be in this field!” Roberts said with a smile.  
    Although the event was not focused solely on girls and women, the goal is to increase the pool of people that are pursuing IT.

  • Join the Santa Fe National Forest from 10 a.m.-5 p.m. April 8 to as part of the Forest Your Health, a local partnership and health initiative.
    The Window Rock Trail hike will include trash pickup, sign installation, archeological interpretation and campfire finale (hot dogs and s’mores).
    The hike is part of Window Rock and lies north of Española off of the highway to Abiquiu.
    Participants should not bring less than three liters of water, plus lunch, shade hat, sunscreen and clothing layers. The round-trip hike is eight miles.
    Contact Jennifer Sublett for more information and to sign-up for this bi-annual stewardship hike at jasublett@fs.fed.us or 505-753-7331.

  • Los Alamos Little Theatre is engaged in producing short staged readings periodically for the Betty Ehart and White Rock senior centers.
    The group is looking for anyone interested in either directing or acting in the staged readings. Because these are brief (10 - 15 minute plays), they are a great opportunity for people who would like to get some experience or practice without a huge investment of time.
    Interested directors or actors should send an e-mail to Pat Beck at pdbeck@aol.com.
    The next time slot for providing a staged reading is in May.

  • Los Alamos Public Schools honored their bus drivers March 17 during National Bus Driver Day.
    “We are truly fortunate in this District to have such a tremendous group of professional drivers and bus assistants. Our team performs their job assignments each day with concern for the safety of students and the public. It is an honor to be a part of this team and district,” said Keith Rosenbaum, LAPS transportation director.
    “Today we celebrated National Bus Driver Day to show our appreciation to the unsung heroes of our community. They get up early every day to guarantee our children get to school on time, safe and sound. The Los Alamos Schools Credit Union wanted show them that we care and that their role in our community is important.  I’d like to thank Bethany for organizing this event and Keith for giving us this opportunity to brighten their day,” said Matt Schmidt of the Los Alamos Schools Credit Union.

  • TODAY
    Fish Fry Friday from 5-7 p.m. at Immaculate Heart Mary Parish Hall, 3700 Canyon Road. Cost is $10 for Adults, $7 for children.

    Gentle Walks at 9 a.m. at the Nature Center. A gentle walk for which the emphasis is on discovery, not mileage gained. Free. More information at peecnature.org.

    Astronomy Show at 7 p.m. at the Nature Canter. Explore the night sky from the comfort of the planetarium. Cost is $6 for adults, $4 for children. More information at peecnature.org.
    SATURDAY
    Habitat for Humanity is hosting a Hawaiian at the Pajarito Brew Pub and Grill. Live Hawaiian-themed music. A special menu of Hawaiian and Hawaiian-inspired dishes and beverages. What better way to celebrate the arrival of spring? So don your loudest Hawaiian shirt and your best grass skirt and hula over to a tropical island paradise at the Pajarito Brew Pub and Grill.

    Snowshoe Hike in the Valles Caldera at 1 p.m. at the Nature Center. Join a ranger and PEEC on a 2 - 2.5 hour, easy-to-moderate snowshoe hike in the Valles Caldera National Preserve. Preserve entrance fee. More information at peecnature.org.

    Feature Film: Exoplanets at 2 p.m. at the Nature Center.

  • The Los Alamos Department of Public Utilities (DPU) announced the launch of its free Los Alamos DPU app Thursday by Smart Energy Systems. 
    The a new cloud-based platform has a friendly interface for DPU customers to access their accounts, track consumption and pay utility bills from their computers or mobile devices, according to department officials.
    In 2015, a DPU customer satisfaction survey revealed that a segment of customers wanted more online functions.
    “Customers under the age of 45 told us that they wanted better ways to do business with us online. We listened and believe the Los Alamos DPU App will allow customers the flexibility and convenience they seek,” said Utilities Manager Tim Glasco, in a statement issued Thursday.  
    Some of the advantages that DPU customers can expect from the Los Alamos DPU app when used on their computers or downloaded to their mobile devices include the ability to:
    • Customize the home screen to create personalized dashboards,
    • View current and historic bills,
    • Make payments with a credit card or electronic check,
    • View current and historic consumption,  
    • Compare personal consumption to the average of all Los Alamos customers’ consumption, and
    • Receive alerts for high or low usage.

  • March 19-25
    For information, call the Betty Ehart Senior Center (BESC) at 662-8920, the White Rock Senior Center (WRSC) at 672-2034 and “Day Out” (adult day care, 8 a.m.-4 p.m.) at 661-0081. Reservations: by 10 a.m. for lunches.
    Betty Ehart

    MONDAY    
    8:45 a.m.        Cardio
    8:30 a.m.        Tax Preparation
    9:45 a.m.        Pilates
    10 a.m.         Senior Civic Discussion
    10 a.m.        LARSO Advisory Council
    11:30 a.m.        Lunch: Taco Salad
    6 p.m.        Argentine Tango Dancing
    7 p.m.        Ballroom Dancing
    TUESDAY
    8:30 a.m.        Mac Users Group
    8:45 a.m.        Variety Training
    10 a.m.        Computer Users
    11:30 a.m.        Lunch: Salisbury steak
    1 p.m.        Bingo
    1 p.m.        Party Bridge
    7:30 p.m.        Table Tennis

  • The Los Alamos Animal Shelter, 226 East Road, 662-8179, has a great selection of adoptable pets just waiting for their forever home, so come adopt your new best friend today! All adoptable pets are microchipped, spayed or neutered, and up-to-date on vaccinations. Shelter hours are noon – 6 p.m. Monday through Friday, 11 a.m.–4 p.m. Saturday, and noon–3 p.m. Sunday.
    Be sure to check out the website at lafos.org, to get more information about volunteering, adopting and donating. Also check out Petfinder website for pictures of adoptable animals: petfinder.com/shelters/friendsoftheshelter.html.
    CATS
    Fernando—A young white and orange kitty who loves lounging the day away. This friendly male is currently in a larger kennel that has a “cat hammock” hanging inside – he loves lounging in it! He can be a bit picky about his feline friends, so he might need a little bit of time to warm up to new companions.
    Mr. Whiskers—A big tabby cat that is about 4 years old. Changes are a bit stressful for him, so he will likely need a little bit of time to adjust to his new home. He can be independent, but he’s also very sweet and likes to snuggle when he’s in the mood! He is okay with mellow cats, but other dominant males sometimes bother him.

  • Although the idea of your pet having surgery can be scary, spaying and neutering is a common practice performed by veterinarians that can be beneficial to both you and your pet. In fact, the decision to spay or neuter your pet may be the best decision for your pet’s overall health.
    Dr. Mark Stickney, clinical associate professor at the Texas A&M College of Veterinary Medicine & Biomedical Sciences, explained the benefits of spaying and neutering.
    “Spaying is the removal of reproductive organs in female dogs and cats,” Stickney said. “Spaying has a few general benefits, such as owners not having to tend to heat cycles or surprise litters of puppies or kittens. Benefits to neutering male pets—or removing the testicles – include decreased urine marking and aggression toward other males. In addition, neutered male pets are less likely to roam, a behavior that typically occurs when females of the same species are in heat. Roaming also puts your male pet at risk for getting lost, hurt, or injured by a car. Spaying and neutering also helps combat pet overpopulation.”