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Features

  • The Pajarito Environmental Education Center’s popular summer program for 5 to 8 year olds will return this fall. Forest Explorers, a hike-and-play club, will take children on hikes from 1-3 p.m. every other Wednesday from Oct. 4 through Dec. 13 and give kids ample time for child-directed play in nature.Forest Explorers is a drop-off program that will meet at the Los Alamos Nature Center every other Wednesday at 1 p.m. for a total of six outings this fall. The hikes will take kids into the nearby canyon where kids will be able to build forts, make seasonal observations, and learn to identify different plants and animals. The Forest Explorers class is taught by educator Denise Matthews and will allow children to have fun outside while working cooperatively, building gross motor skills, and learning more about the local ecology

    Matthews leads the Nature Playtimes program for PEEC and also serves as an instructor for the year-round Pebble Pups club, school field trips, and classroom visits. She has taught science in the classroom and as an environmental educator for the past 12 years. Matthews is passionate about providing kids the opportunity to connect with the local environment through child-directed outdoor exploration and inquiry.

  • BY DEBBIE STONE

     

    Special to the Monitor

    He seemed like such a nice guy. That was the group’s initial impression of our hiking guide, Paul – a mellow, wry humored Canuck. 

    Paul appeared calm and assuring as he gathered us around to talk about our first hike of the day. Moments before, the helicopter had gently set us down in front of Howser Towers, an impressive set of peaks in the Bugaboos, a range within the Columbia Mountains of British Columbia. 

    The name “Bugaboo” actually means a hoax in Old English. Story has it that when folks came up here looking for gold, they found only pyrite, or fool’s gold, so they aptly called the area the Bugaboos and the name stuck. 

  • Valles Caldera National Preserve will host two star parties this fall, one on Saturday from 7-10:30 p.m. and another on Oct. 14 from 6:30-10 p.m. To minimize light pollution, gates will close 1.5 hours after the event begins, so late arrivals risk not being able to participate.
    These star parties will take place near the Valle Grande Entrance Station. Park staff and educators from the Pajarito Environmental Education Center will provide short talks, telescopes for viewing, and youth activities. Visitors are encouraged to bring personal telescopes, blankets, and chairs for their stargazing pleasure. The Valle Grande Bookstore, operated by Los Amigos de Valles Caldera, will have hot drinks and snacks, as well as books and gifts, available for purchase.
    “We are excited to share these remarkable night skies with our visitors,” said Superintendent Jorge Silva-Bañuelos. “The preserve’s distance from nearby towns allows for almost unimpaired star gazing.”
    Although light-use should be limited as much as possible, visitors are encouraged to come prepared with a red-tinted light source. Visitors should also dress in layers, as nighttime temperatures regularly drop to 20-30 degrees Fahrenheit.

  • The Los Alamos Public Schools Foundation has announced that it will hold its popular fundraiser, Taste of Knowledge at 5:30 p.m. Oct. 14 at the old De Colores restaurant location. The theme this year is “Experience the Food and Wine of Spain.”

    Pig+Fig’s Chef Laura Crucet will create scrumptious Spanish tapas, which will be paired with unique boutique Spanish wines.

    Representatives from Favorite Brands and Jose Pastor Selections will talk about the different wine producing regions of Spain and what wines are produced there. During the tasting, local jazz band The Ryan Finn Quartet will entertain with live music. Ryan Finn is the Los Alamos Middle School Band instructor, whose classroom benefitted from a $25,000 makeover facilitated by the LAPS Foundation in the summer of 2016.

    As this is a fundraiser benefiting Los Alamos Public Schools’ teachers, staff, students and facilities, the LAPS Foundation is including elements from many talented Los Alamos students. LAHS Culinary Arts students will prepare the food under the supervision of Chef Laura Crucet, while LAHS Art Club members will dress as Spanish waiters and help out during the event. Several DALA and LAHS dancers will perform Spanish-themed dances, and Key Club and Hilltalkers members have volunteered to help with the event, as well.

  • TODAY
     Jemez Thrift Shop at 13 Sherwood Blvd, in White Rock will have a Bag Day from 10 a.m.-1 p.m.
    THURSDAY
    Summer Nature Drawing
from 10-2:30 p.m. at the Nature Center. Enjoy botanical drawing and watercolor with Santa Fe artist Lisa Coddington. Cost is $56 for members, $70 for non-members.
    FRIDAY
    Jemez Thrift Shop at 13 Sherwood Blvd, in White Rock will have a Bag Day from 10 a.m.-4 p.m.

    Gentle Walks at 9 a.m. at the Nature Center.
A gentle walk for which the emphasis is on discovery, not mileage gained. Free. More information at peecnature.org.

    Homeschool Bird Banding Field Trip from 9-11:30 a.m. at the Nature Center.
Homeschoolers: Meet the birds of the Jemez Mountains and observe an active field science investigation in Bandelier’s backcountry! Free. More information at peecnature.org.

    Total Solar Eclipse Show
is SOLD OUT at 7 p.m. at the Nature Center. More information at peecnature.org.

  •  Pajarito Environmental Education Center is working with the Los Alamos Mountaineers to offer a 10-mile hike with Evan Rose from town to the Pajarito Mountain ski area on Sept. 23 starting at 7:45 a.m.

    Since space is limited, registration is required for this free hike.

    The 10-mile trek with Evan Rose offers spectacular views of Los Alamos and the Sangre de Cristo Mountains, the option to enjoy Ullr Fest after the hike, and a ride back to your vehicle via Atomic City Transit.

    Hikers should expect is expected to take about six hours with more time for the bus and festival (optional). Along the way, hikers will have spectacular views of Los Alamos and the Sangre de Cristo Mountains, the option to enjoy Ullr Fest after the hike, and a ride back to your vehicle via Atomic City Transit.

    The hike is considered strenuous due to the steep and rocky terrain, long distance, and lack of bail-out points.

    The route will follow Quemazon Trail, connect with Pipeline Trail and finish by way of the Canada Bonita Trail in the parking lot of Pajarito Mountain ski hill.

    Participants must be capable of the full hike distance (10 miles), high elevation (from 7,300-9,800 feet), and altitude gain (2,500 feet).

  • BY KELLY DOLEJSI
    Special to the Monitor

    Billed as a “nervous romance,” “Annie Hall” (1977, rated PG) is one of the funniest, most bittersweet, most intimate, and most memorable films of all time. Los Alamos audiences will have an opportunity to see it for the first time – or the 20th time – at 6:30 p.m. Thursday upstairs at Mesa Public Library.

    Director/Writer Woody Allen plays twice-divorced stand-up comedian Alvy Singer, who feels an instant attraction to Annie (Diane Keaton), despite her blundering conversation, adventurous driving, and possible anti-semitism. The relationship moves through the la-dee-dah stage to therapist envy to arguments about community college to a desperate marriage proposal to sincerely wishing each other well.

    It’s beautiful, with lots of endearing/annoying personality traits and a few lobsters.

    In Alvy’s quest for self-understanding, the narrative looks beyond Alvy’s current relationship to his marriages to Alison (Carol Kane), who finds Alvy physically desirable, thereby causing Alvy to lose interest, and Robin (Janet Margolin), who coldly denies Alvy “intimacy” because there are people from The New Yorker downstairs.

  • I love this time of year as we begin to dive into the heart of the Search Institute’s 40 Developmental Assets©.
    I feel like D. Peter Benson, who so loved New Mexico, is smiling down knowing that his legacy still continues.

    September marks the annual proclamation for the Los Alamos County Council to recognize the month as the beginning of building the Assets in our community. The work is so important that I have volunteered to write a weekly column for many years because I believe in the work so very much.

    The Assets are 40 traits and characteristics that we, as a community, can focus on for youth. If we dedicate some time each month throughout the school year, we can help our children to grow into healthy young adults.

    “Healthy Community, Healthy Youth,” is the motto and it is needed in our community, the state and the nation. You don’t have to do anything monumental, but pay attention and build meaningful relationships whenever you have the opportunity.

  • Want to learn more about the Hubble Telescope and the Universe? Come to the Los Alamos Nature Center Planetarium for a presentation on one of NASA’s most ambitious experiments at 7 p.m. Sept. 15 . The full-dome planetarium film Exploding Universe will play at 2 p.m. Sept. 16 and 17.

    On Sept. 15, the show will begin with a screening of NOVA: Invisible Universe Revealed, which will be followed by a talk by Dr. Rick Wallace. The film and presentation will share the astronomical significance of the Hubble Space Telescope findings, including cosmic expansion and supermassive black holes.

    Exploding Universe, showing at 2 p.m. Sept. 16 and 17, uncovers cosmic events that shaped the Universe. This full-dome film explores a world where supernovas erupt, massive materials collide, and protons give birth to life as we know it. For more information about these and future planetarium shows, visit peecnature.org/planetarium. For tickets, call 662-0460.
     

  • McDonald’s will host a free breakfast event for all kindergarten through eighth-grade students and teachers (with I.D.) throughout New Mexico from 6-9 a.m. Wednesday, in partnership with Dairy MAX.

    The free breakfast will include an Egg McMuffin or Egg White Delight McMuffin, apple slices and choice of 1percent milk or apple juice.

    The students must be accompanied by a parent/adult and child must be present. Teachers must present a school I.D. No group redemption allowed.

    Free breakfast is available while supplies last. No substitutions.

  • TUESDAY
    Charles Strickfaden will present “Partnership Parks in the 21st Century – Building a national park from nothing: Manhattan Project Historical Park (with a perspective by Valles Caldera National Preserve staff)” at 7 p.m. at the Nature Center. Strickfaden, the Los Alamos Site Manager, will enlighten attendees on some of the efforts required to initiate, design and develop a newly established unit of the National Park Service. Please join us at PEEC to ask questions and find out about volunteer opportunities with this growing park.

    Rotary Club of Los Alamos will meet from noon-1 p.m. at the golf course. Everyone is welcome. The speaker will be Andrea Romero who will talk about ostrich farming.

    Kiwanis will meet from noon-1 p.m. in Kelly Hall at Trinity-on-the-Hill Episcopal Church, 3900 Trinity Drive in Los Alamos. Kiwanis member Don Casperson, who attended this year’s Kiwanis International Convention in Paris, France, is scheduled to speak on his experiences there.
    WEDNESDAY
    Jemez Thrift Shop at 13 Sherwood Blvd, in White Rock will have a Bag Day from 10 a.m.-1 p.m.
    THURSDAY

  • Though many of us find it hard to believe anyone would intentionally harm a pet, animal abuse is a shocking and tragic occurrence. Before welcoming a previously abused animal into your home, it is important to understand this abuse and how it can affect your pet.

    Dr. Stacy Eckman, clinical assistant professor at the Texas A&M College of Veterinary Medicine & Biomedical Sciences, explained animal abuse.

    “Animal cruelty can either be deliberate injury or abuse to an animal,” Eckman said. “It can also be neglecting to care for an animal by failing to provide food, shelter, or water.”

    Eckman added that abandonment, lack of veterinary care, malnutrition, and physical injuries all are considered abuse. Additionally, an animal is considered abused if it is living in an overcrowded environment or being used for animal fighting. In these cases, it may be appropriate to contact local animal control authorities so they can investigate and get an understanding of the abuse.

  • Meet Betty, the Los Alamos Animal Shelter’s Pet of the Week.

    This lovable medium build Australian cattle dog has been at the LA Shelter since Aug. 26 and is looking for her forever home.

    This friendly girl is 3 and a half years old and appears to be house trained.

    Betty would make a great sister to current household pets as she gets along well with other dogs.

    Betty has experience walking on leashes and even knows some basic obedience.

    Betty is spayed, up to date on all vaccines and is available to be adopted today.

    For those interested in similar heeler type dogs, the shelter also has two other male heelers that are ready to be adopted.

    For more information on this beautiful girl, contact the Los Alamos County Animal Shelter at 662-8179 or email police-psa@lacnm.us.

  • SATURDAY
    The final White Rock Artist Market will be from 10 a.m.-3 p.m. outside the White Rock Visitor Center. This is the last Artist Market for the summer and will return Memorial Weekend 2018. The White Rock Visitor Center is located at 115 NM State Road 4 and is open daily from 8 a.m.-6 p.m. For information about the White Rock Artist Markets, contact Melanie Peña at 661-4836 or email melanie@losalamos.org.

    Bigfoot BBQ and & Blues Fest from 11 a.m.-4 p.m. in Jemez Springs. Festival will include a barbecue, music and lecture to celebrate Bigfoot. 1 Jemez Plaza, Jemez Springs.
    TUESDAY
    Charles Strickfaden will present “Partnership Parks in the 21st Century – Building a national park from nothing: Manhattan Project Historical Park (with a perspective by Valles Caldera National Preserve staff)” at 7 p.m. at the Nature Center. Strickfaden, the Los Alamos Site Manager, will enlighten attendees on some of the efforts required to initiate, design and develop a newly established unit of the National Park Service. Please join us at PEEC to ask questions and find out about volunteer opportunities with this growing park.

  • BY WREN PROPP
    Special to the Monitor

    A treasure of the Española Valley’s creative community will be celebrating its 20th anniversary in mid-September, a result of hard work, strong roots and a growing national spotlight, organizers say.

    Within the 7,000 square feet of its storefront building on Paseo de Onate in Española, the Española Valley Fiber Arts Center fosters fiber arts of many types and textures. A public celebration of the center’s longevity and future will be 1-4 p.m. on Sept. 16 at the center.

    “It’s unique. It’s really a national gem because it’s given a place for this,” art and craft, said Bethe S. Orrell, a former director of the nonprofit center.

    Weavers, knitters, colcha artists, felters, students and professionals, have been drawn to the center over the years. It offers classes in many styles of fiber arts from nationally recognized artists, as well as a retail store for finished products and materials, where prices are comparable. A library, work spaces for some techniques and a large room of looms are all part of the mix.

  • Kelly Hall of the Trinity-on-the-Hill Church transformed into a beautifully decorated high tea for women (and men) of all ages Saturday who came to watch a parade of fashions, sip tea and contribute to a local missions group.

    The seventh-annual Tea and Fashion Show fundraiser, which is the biggest fundraiser for the House of Hope building group, was able to collect over half of their financial goal from the event.

    Between the tickets, silent auction and donations, House of Hope made about $5,000. On top of that, a private donator offered to match, up to a certain amount, the funds raised through the silent auction.

    House of Hope builds homes for families in need in Ciudad Juarez, Mexico and that requires over $10,000 per home. All of the money goes toward building that home because the builders pay their own room and board while in Juarez.

    The classical piano music provided by Joe Cox created the perfect ambiance to mingle with friends, peer at silent auction items and taste a multitude of different teas.

    “I think it went very well,” said Nancy Coombs, who helped organize the event overall, including the silent auction. Coombs said, “The people that came said they had a lovely time,” and some were talking about it at church the next day.

  • Views expressed on programs shown on PAC 8 do not necessarily reflect the views of the manager, staff, or board. 

     

    Friday, August 25, 2017

    6:00 AM Democracy Now! – Live

    10:00 AM The Tom Hartman Program

    11:00 AM County Council Meeting –Replay 8-08-17

    1:00 PM Democracy Now!

    2:00 PM United in Christ

    3:00 PM Road to Recovery

    4:00 PM Uprising

    5:00 PM Democracy Now!

    6:00 PM Chamber Business Breakfast – Housing in Los Alamos

    7:00 PM Suspended Moment – Los Alamos

    8:00 PM Los Alamos High School Graduation

    10:00 PM Living Treasures Ceremony

  • The heart of the Sangre de Cristo Mountains has long called out to the singer-songwriter as part inspiration and part haven for their craft. 

    Red River, New Mexico, is the center of this musical mecca and celebrates again with world class talent at the third-annual Red River Folk Festival, set for Sept. 21-24. 

    Venues include the Lost Love Saloon, Brandenburg Park, the Motherlode and Bittercreek Ranch. 

    Early Bird Tickets are still available for the musical feast, featuring James McMurtry, Shawn Mullins, Chuck Prophet, Jim Lauderdale, Max Gomez and more.

    Paired with the popular Aspencade Arts and Crafts Fair, there are local and national musical acts on the outside stage during the day in Brandenburg Park including Honey House – an all-female folk group powerhouse, Mariachi, Jed Zimmerman and Kelley Mickwee, the Red River Family Band along with other fun surprises. 

  • ALBUQUERQUE (AP) — Organizers of one of North America’s most prominent American Indian powwows say they’re already gearing up for next year’s event.

    They kicked off their promotional campaign for the 2018 Gathering of Nations on Friday with the release of the event’s official poster.

    The 35th annual event takes place April 26-28 at the state fairgrounds in Albuquerque. The Miss Indian World Talent Competition will be held downtown at the city’s convention center.

    New for next year will be a parade featuring Native American riders in full regalia. Organizers say the parade is meant to recognize the importance that the horse culture holds for some tribes.

     

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    The gathering usually draws tens of thousands of people, including dancers, singers and drummers representing tribes from across the United States, Canada and elsewhere.

  • BY DEBBIE STONE

     

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    Special to the Monitor

    An overactive imagination can really play a number on you, especially when it concerns ghosts. I confess I’m not one who believes in the paranormal world, as I’m a skeptic at heart. I rely on science to explain the unexplained, choosing to go the rational route when in doubt. Hearing accounts from others who have seen spectral images or felt otherworldly presences around them typically elicits a raised eyebrow or hearty guffaw from me.