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Features

  • The Betty Ehart Senior Center, benefiting the Empty Bowls Project, is sponsoring a bowl building workshop for senior citizens at the Art Center at Fuller Lodge Ceramics Studio.The workshops will be held from 10 a.m. - noon Saturday and Feb. 2. Participants will build a minimum of two bowls, one to keep and the other(s) to donate to the Empty Bowls Project. Cost for the workshop is $20, which covers the cost of supplies. To sign up to make bowls contact the Betty Ehart Senior Center, 662-8920, Joyce Nickols, 662-2810 or e-mail bowls@selfhelpla.com.

  • For the first time in its history, a local guitarist will take the stage during the Los Alamos Arts Council’s Guitars and Gateaux show.Richard Hannemann, singer/songwriter, guitarist/composer will perform Jan. 24 at Fuller Lodge.Desserts will be served at 7 p.m. and the concert begins at 7:30 p.m.“I’m looking forward to this,” Hannemann said.

  • My Score 4.5/5You may know the Coen brothers, that is, Joel and Ethan Coen, from such films as “Hudsucker Proxy,” “Barton Fink,” “Blood Simple,” “Oh Brother Where Art Thou,” “Fargo,” “Raising Arizona,” well, the list goes on and on. The number of quality films this writing/directing/producing duo has come out with since the 1980s is astounding. Their films have received worldwide recognition, and “A” list talent like George Clooney and Matt Damon seek to collaborate with them.

  • Never heard of the Ballets Russes? Lonide Massine? Bronislava Njinska? Alexandra Danilova? Alicia Markova?Unless you are a dancer, chances are you haven’t. The choreographers and prima ballerinas – legends in the ballet world – are not exactly household names in 21st century America.However, in the 1940s, they were stars.Dayna Goldfine and Dan Geller’s “Ballets Russes” (2005), screening at 7 p.m.

  • After spending nearly seven years serving patients in Los Alamos and the surrounding area, Dr. Marion Messersmith, an orthodontist, has decided to return to full-time teaching. Dr. Messersmith and his wife, Cricket, will be moving to Nashville where Messersmith will be the Program Director of the Orthodontic Program at Vanderbilt University.“Reaching this decision has been agonizing for Cricket and me,” Dr Messersmith said. “We have thoroughly enjoyed living in Los Alamos.

  • Eleven seventh and eighth grade students at Los Alamos Middle School proved their smarts during the Knowledge Master Competition.They ranked first in the state and 22nd of the 711 teams in the world that participated.During the competition, students were given the questions on a CD and competed right at the middle school, said Barbara Jo Mullis, eighth grade teacher and the coach of the middle school team. The competition occurred in December 2007.Questions covered everything from current events and literature to mathematics and science.

  • As a college student and a U.S. citizen, 2006 Los Alamos High School graduate Elena Gustafson feels privileged but believes with that privilege comes responsibility to help others throughout the world.She is not the only one; several LAHS students share her feelings.Gustafson is taking on that responsibility by being an active member of Youth Development Initiatives, which is a student-run organization at Whitman College in Walla Walla, Wash.

  • Glen M. Leonard, a senior scholar on Mormonism, will discuss the faith’s first leader in an upcoming presentation titled “Joseph Smith: The Man and the Myth” at 7 p.m. Sunday at the Jesus Christ of Latter-Day Saints White Rock Ward.

  • Who knew the devil could be so entertaining? From a fancy-dressed demon to a fiddler with a red face and horns, Satan showed his (or her) many faces during Los Alamos Little Theatre’s production of “The Devil and Daniel Webster.”Although the play is the main feature, the theater company shows its creativity in other performances.

  • Thirty-three Los Alamos High School students traveled to Albuquerque Wednesday not for a field trip or a vacation but for music. These students, along with their teachers, will be participating in the All-State Music Festival.During the festival, which runs through Saturday, participants will be studying, practicing and performing music at the University of New Mexico. Concerts held all-day Saturday will conclude the program.Members of each choir will perform seven songs while the bands and orchestras prepare for their pieces.

  • The 2008 Empty Bowls Project, held each year to benefit the local nonprofit organization, Self Help Inc., is underway.This will mark the Empty Bowl Project’s 15th year of providing bowls and a silent auction, hosting a soup and bread lunch and entertainment all for a price of $10 for each bowl.

  • “Red Dominant” features two- and three-dimensional works in many mediums including fiber, colored pencil, photography, acrylic, oil, watercolor, stained glass, wood and pastel, all with the color red foremost.

  • On a dark and foggy night, Benjamin Barker returns from a long prison sentence for a crime of which he was falsely accused. Upon his arrival in London he finds that everything that he once loved has vanished: his wife has been poisoned, his daughter imprisoned by the judge who, ironically, sabotaged his family and his career as a barber.

  • The Music Teachers National Associations Six State Southwest Divisional Competition judges may be evaluating the musical talents of Peter Song, Kathy Lin and Angela Helm, but Los Alamos will be first to enjoy the students’ music.The public is invited to attend a recital given by Song, Lin and Helm at 2 p.m. Sunday at Fuller Lodge.These musicians were chosen through an audition to be the representatives for New Mexico at the Music Teachers National Associations Six State Southwest Divisional Competition to be held Jan. 19-20 in Las Cruces.

  • Getting into college is tough. “It’s a question of demographics,” said Dr. Whitney Laughlin of Rubin Education Services. More young people, 70-75 percent, are going to college and more are looking at a small number of top schools in the U.S., which is creating a bottleneck, she said.To add to the situation, the government is providing less financial aid. As a result, Laughlin is offering some assistance to college-bound students and their families by hosting a workshop from 7-8:30 p.m. Jan. 22 at Fuller Lodge.

  • Los Alamos County Ice Rink was formed by damming water and setting out sprinklers. Within 60, years it has turned into a modernized facility that is embraced by the community. To recognize the rink’s age and accomplishments, an anniversary celebration is being planned.The three-day celebration will begin with an After-school Birthday Bash, which will be held from 12:30-3:30 p.m. Jan. 23 at the ice rink.

  • Getting into college is tough. “It’s a question of demographics,” said Dr. Whitney Laughlin of Rubin Education Services. More young people, 70-75 percent, are going to college and more are looking at a small number of top schools in the U.S., which is creating a bottleneck, she said.To add to the situation, the government is providing less financial aid. As a result, Laughlin is offering some assistance to college-bound students and their families by hosting a workshop from 7-8:30 p.m. Jan. 22 at Fuller Lodge.

  • After Sunday, Redeemer Evangelical Lutheran Mission will be no more. Its identity, which is shared with Immanuel Lutheran Church in Santa Fe, will change.Rather than being a daughter mission of Immanuel, Redeemer Evangelical will become a sister congregation known as Redeemer Evangelical Lutheran Church. The difference between being a mission and a congregation, Rev. Brian Kachelmeier said, lies in church policy and structure.

  • A single act can create significant changes. Just look at what occurred in Albuquerque during the 1920s and 1930s.During this time period, a campaign was underway to make Albuquerque the crossroads of New Mexico.To accomplish this, the city worked to realign Route 66. Instead of running north to south, city officials including mayor ex-officio and former governor Clyde Tingley, worked to realign the highway from east and west.