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Features

  • I need to begin by stating my bias: I love plays. I have trouble finishing novels, but plays I really book through. This is not a mark of theatrical dexterity. Plays have fewer pages. They contain the barest modicum of description.

  • After a year and a half of work, the Los Alamos Cooperative Market has some big news to share. The announcement will occur during its first annual cooperative membership meeting at 6:15 p.m. Sunday at the Betty Ehart Senior Center.Besides the announcement, the meeting will provide live music by the Roaring Jellies and a potluck dinner.Along with a dish, participants are encouraged to bring the recipe, which will be put into a cooperative cookbook. The public is welcome to attend.So what is the big news?

  • This Sunday marks the 80th anniversary of the Academy Awards. To kick off Hollywood’s annual event, The Los Alamos Community Winds will bring a little bit of “Tinseltown” to the stage this weekend with a concert of music from television and motion pictures titled “Friday Night at the Movies.”Friday’s concert marks the fourth in a series of biennial concerts of music from film and television that The Los Alamos Community Winds have produced.

  • Playschool gets ValentinesLittle Forest Playschool wishes to thank the following individuals and businesses for their donations to the “For Your Valentine” silent auction.

  • Last year Pion Elementary School sixth-grade class achieved the highest percentage of advanced and proficient scores in math and science on the New Mexico Standards Based Assessment in the state.This means more than just meeting the state’s expectations; the high scores are proof of the school’s team work, principal Megan Lee said.Everyone, from teachers to students to parents contributed to this success, Lee said.

  • “The Joy Luck Club” may be a work of fiction, but readers can uncover universal truths within its pages and may even glimpse aspects of their own lives in the story.The book has several themes, said Charlie Kalogeros-Chattan, library manager. The relationships between mother and daughter, wife and husband, and old and new generations are just a few.Because of its many themes, Kalogeros-Chattan believed it would be a perfect book to discuss with the community.

  • In his masterwork, “The Forge and the Crucible,” Mercea Eliade writes of the great chthonic force that is hidden deep within the bowels of the earth. That force is released with the mining of metals and minerals.The advance of civilization is linked to the power of metals. We speak of the bronze and iron ages, for example.

  • For the past 20 years, several churches have spent Wednesday nights together during the season of Lent. The Rev. Colin Kelly of Trinity on the Hill Episcopal Church (TOTH), said, back in 1987, he and the Rev. Calder Gibson of Bethlehem Evangelical Lutheran Church (BELC) and the Rev. Gus of Immaculate Heart of Mary Roman Catholic Church (IHM) created Ecumenical Lenten Wednesdays in Los Alamos.The five-week shared program has been a tradition for many churchgoers in Los Alamos, a part of the life cycle of Christian practice for them and a 20-year habit.

  • One hundred-forty pages into Gao Xingjian’s “Soul Mountain,” I realized I wasn’t getting it. I understood the basics: The narrator wants to go to Lingshan, translated as “Soul Mountain.” At least, one of the narrators wants to go.

  • Los Alamos High School student Tess Montoya plays the girl of Eli Barnes’ dreams in the National Dance Institute of New Mexico’s ballet, “An American in Paris.”Montoya plays a flower girl who falls in love with Eli Barnes’ character, who is an American living in Paris.

  • Once again, New Mexico Dance Theater (NMDT) Performance Company and director Susan Baker-Dillingham are bringing an original story ballet to Los Alamos. NMDT will present Baker-Dillingham’s original version of the Brothers Grimm fairy tale, “Snow White,” Feb. 22- 24 at the Duane W.

  • The Boy Scouts of Troop 222 recently completed a new tricycle track for the preschool program at Barranca Mesa Elementary School.The project, which took five weekends to complete, involved cleaning and preparing the playground area, meeting with the preschool teachers to design and layout the new track, obtaining the necessary materials and painting the new roadway.“The preschoolers will use the track as a guide for riding their tricycles.” Carrie Johnson, a Barranca preschool teacher, said.

  • My Score: 4/5 kernels

  • While working through parent/teacher conference week, the community is making sure the Pion Elementary School staff does not go hungry. The Hill Diner, Ruby K’s and Bandelier Grill are donating soup while parents are providing bread, fruit and side dishes. Even the sixth-graders are joining in on this effort.Feeding the staff was also held last year, however, they ate their meals out of disposable bowls.

  • The University of New Mexico-Los Alamos is proud to announce that UNM-LA students Matthew Early and Bethany Stephens have recently been named to the 2008 New Mexico All-State Academic Team.Team members were recognized at a ceremony held Jan. 23 at the State Capitol in Santa Fe. New Mexico team members are eligible to compete for the USA Today-sponsored All-USA Academic Team.The honor recognizes academic achievement by students attending community colleges and encourages students to maintain their hard work and dedication.

  • The Musical Fireworks continue Feb. 23, when the Los Alamos Concert Association brings the Imani Winds, a wind quintet to Los Alamos. Imani Winds will present a master class at 11 a.m. at the University of New Mexico-Los Alamos and a concert at 8 p.m. in Duane Smith Auditorium. A reception will follow the concert.Imani Winds, founded in 1997, is an American wind quintet based in New York. The quintet comprises flute, oboe, clarinet, French horn, and bassoon, and is known for its adventurous programming.

  • Tuesday, Chamisa Elementary School is taking the time to recognize a major milestone. The school will host its 40th birthday with a community wide celebration.The school will pay tribute to their history with a short presentation at 8:15 a.m., which will feature some very special guests. Five former principals will be returning to the site to share their fondest memories of their elementary days.

  • The Catholic Church originally recognized 10 or 11 Valentines (some of them Bishops), although several of them could have been the same person.Eight hundred years before the establishment of Valentine’s Day, the Romans had practiced a pagan celebration in mid-February commemorating young men’s growth to maturity. The celebration required men to draw the names of young girls from a box.

  • Dr. Charlie Carrillo, scholar, teacher, lecturer and artist, has a piece of history he would like to share.The Los Alamos Historical Society is providing an opportunity to experience what Carrillo has to offer during its historical lecture at 7:30 p.m. Tuesday at Fuller Lodge.For the past 28 years, Carrillo has studied and created depictions of the saints of the Pueblos. He has carved their images out of wood and painted flat images called retablos. Carrillo preserves the traditional creations of santos, or saints, but also adds something new.

  • In the Los Alamos Choral Society and Los Alamos Symphony Orchestra’s winter concert Jan. 27 at the Immaculate Heart of Mary Church, under the direction of Mary Badarak, the Oratorio “Elijah” by Felix Mendelssohn was presented.Many members of the chorus, now numbering 61, have sung this familiar work numerous times.