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Features

  • Four/five kernels As a journalist, it’s important to keep your priorities straight. The story comes first, and when you’re writing it, you – and your own ambitions – don’t matter. However, a person can get mixed up when a big story for means big money for him.Kirk Douglas stars as a crooked reporter in the next film up in Mesa Public Library’s free monthly series, Billy Wilder’s “Ace in the Hole” (1951), screening at 6:30 p.m.

  • The Jemez Mountain Home-school Speech and Debate Team did it again. Throughout the course of the year these avid “speechies” have worked to do their best at every tournament they attend. The team, which is comprised of students from Los Alamos and surrounding areas, has had put their efforts awarded with individual and team recognition throughout the competitive season.The team competes with the best and the brightest speech and debate enthusiasts from public and private high schools across the state as part of the New Mexico Speech and Debate Association.

  • When you hear the words, Los Alamos travels to State, one generally thinks sports, but this weekend 15 students will be thinking science. The winners from the regional science held in March in Las Vegas, N.M., now advance to the state level Friday and Saturday at New Mexico Tech in Socorro.The 52nd annual regional event held at NMHU is a time-honored tradition and coordinator Dawn Brown said she is proud of her students.

  • When I first heard about Ice Cream Man I knew I wanted to do a documentary on him. The guy’s goal in life is to give away half a million free ice creams; what a story that is. Well, I got the opportunity to shoot the Ice Cream Man in action at South by Southwest (SXSW), a music festival in Austin, Texas, the second week of March.SXSW is not a typical music festival. It’s not a huge, outdoor, crowded, hot, loud scene with thousands of people milling about.

  • White Rock Canyon is filled with potential to attract climbers in and out of state. For instance, it offers a full-gambit of climbing – sport, top rope and “trad” or traditional climbing. It is easily accessible from Los Alamos and is suitable for those who are venturing out of the gym rock wall for the first time.Despite its potential, not many big, out-of-town groups have come to the canyon; until now.

  • National Library Week will run April 13-19.

  • Ruth Lambert of Los Alamos has covered a lot of ground in 100 years. From Minnesota, to Wisconsin, California, Colorado and New Mexico, Lambert has pretty much seen and done it all.On her 100th birthday, which was March 22, Lambert reminisced about all the places she had been and things she had experienced. She grew up in Austin, Minn., and majored in journalism from the University of Iowa. While in college, Lambert said, she worked at the university’s newspaper. Her journalism career took her to the Janesville Gazette, in Janesville, Wis.

  • The Los Alamos Jewish Center will hold its annual community Passover Seder at 5:30 p.m. April 20 at the Betty Ehart Senior Center. The event is open to anyone interested in attending.The Seder is a ceremonial dinner filled with rituals designed to celebrate the Jewish people’s exodus from Egypt. The Seder, which is Hebrew for order, ushers in the week of Pesach in which Jews refrain from eating Chametz, or leavened breads.

  • A little bit of old and new will be featured in Peter Pesic’s program for the upcoming Brown Bag show at 12:30 p.m.

  • Telos in Greek means the end or purpose for which something is done and teleology is the study of the evidence of design in nature. “The Art Expressions in Technology and Science” exhibition, showing in the Art Center at Fuller Lodge Gallery, raises important questions as to the end or purpose of art and its relation to the end and purpose of science.Are the ends of science the same or radically different from art? If they are different, what are those differences? Does art participate in some way in the scientific method?

  • A few people can make a very big difference and Los Alamos youth rate at the top of the heap. Local Key Club member Kelsey Souza leads the charge in an effort to raise funds for Beads of Courage.Beads of Courage is a non-profit organization started by Tucson, Ariz., nurse Jean Baruch in March 2005. She saw children suffering from cancer, blood disorders, cardiac conditions as well as traumatic burn injuries, and other long term diseases, and wanted a way to make their treatment in the hospital more positive.

  • Ancient meets modern in “Icons: Windows on Eternity,” an exhibit of icons painted in the traditional style by Los Alamos artists. The exhibit is on display through May 5 in the University of New Mexico-Los Alamos Library. There will be an opening reception for the show from 5-7 p.m. Thursday. The opening will include a gallery talk by Father John Hennies of Saint Dimitri Orthodox Church on the history and religious significance of icons. The talk will begin around 5:30 p.m. Refreshments will be served.

  • My Score: 3.5/5 kernelsHorton, voiced by Jim Carrey, is a somewhat happy-go-lucky elephant living in a lush jungle called Nool. Typically, life for Horton and the other animals of Nool is fairly ordinary, that is until a little speck goes flying by the ears of the elephant. Because of Horton’s incredible hearing he is able to hear faint voices from creatures that live on a microscopic world, called Who-Ville, within the speck.Upon the little, impeccable world of the speck lives a whole civilization of creatures that call themselves Whos.

  • First-time students can start up their education during kindergarten roundups, which will be held throughout April at elementary schools in Los Alamos. All the schools require two proofs of residency, such as a lease/purchase agreement or utility bill, birth certificate, immunization records and a registration form.Pion Elementary School will host its roundup from 1-2 p.m. April 23. Registration packets are available at the main office.Registration will continue from 1:30-2:30 p.m. April 23 at Chamisa Elementary School.

  • Los Alamos was well represented at the 2008 New Mexico Scholastic Chess Championships held last month. More than 175 players representing schools as well as independent players and chess clubs throughout the state participated in the three tournaments, kindergarten-12th grade, kindergarten-ninth grade and kindergarten-sixth grade.

  • Benjamin Silva became a guitarist accidentally. He stumbled upon his mother’s guitar and began playing.

  • “I’m a serious academic historian,” Noel Pugach said.It’s true – but it may slip your mind when you see him perform as Lew Wallace this week at Mesa Public Library. You might think he’s a progressive 19th-century territorial governor of New Mexico, author of one of the most popular American novels of his time.“Wallace” will speak at 7 p.m. Thursday as part of the library’s Authors Speak Series, held monthly in the upstairs rotunda.

  • According to the Rev. Bruce Kuenzel, the wisdom of a community is more than just what one person has to say. This point will be exercised during the Science, Ethics and Religion Workshop from 9:30 a.m.-3:30 p.m. April 19 at Bethlehem Lutheran Church.While ELCA theologian Larry Rasmussen will lead the discussion, he will not be the lone voice. Many people from different walks of life will carry the conversation. For instance, physicist Robert Kraus, theologian Dick Avery of Santa Fe, retired Catholic Rev.

  • The dating of Easter is something of a complicated and confusing thing; (depending on whether one uses the Gregorian calendar or the Julian calendar, and how conversant one is with the timing of the Paschal Full Moon, the first Sunday after which is officially Easter, assuming that it coincides somewhat with the first Ecclesiastical Full Moon after March 20, which happened to be the vernal equinox in AD 325, the year the Council of Nicea addressed the issue.) Sort of takes all the fun out of it, huh?One may find it more advantageous simply to consult one’s Day-Timer.