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Features

  • I read Monday on BBC that at least 10,000 people died as a result of this week’s earthquake in the Sichuan province in southwestern China. I read several news reports estimating more than 28,000 are dead in Myanmar after the cyclone. A mob killed two migrants in Johannesburg, South Africa, injuring 40 more. Upwards of 60 people have been killed in the last week in Tripoli, Lebanon, as fighting has flared between those who support the government at the Hezbollah-led opposition. Violence continues in Sudan, Israel, Iraq, Afghanistan – where have I left out?

  • Claire Gillis has been a member of the Los Alamos Retired and Senior Volunteer Program (RSVP) for eight years. She lends her time to a quilters’ group, the Betty Ehart Senior Center and the gift shop at the Los Alamos Medical Center.

    “It gives me something to do, it gets me out with people and in return I’m do something good for others,” Gillis said.

  • It’s not just brains that are needed to be a successful employee of New Mexico’s cultural institutions; you need attitude, a crusader’s attitude to be exact.

    Historian Thomas E. Chavez will explain just what it takes to make it in the state’s cultural institutions during the Los Alamos Historical Society’s lecture at 7:30 p.m. Tuesday at Fuller Lodge.

  • They came up with an unbreakable code that helped end a world war and then they were cast into the shadows of the public’s consciousness, until now.

    The Circle of Light Project and Mesa Public Library are shining the light on the Navajo Code Talkers in an exhibit, titled “Our Fathers, Our Grandfathers, Our Heroes ee The Navajo Code Talkers of World War II,” that opened last week.

    To commemorate the event, Chester Naz, one of the original 29 code talkers, made an appearance at the opening reception, which was held May 3.

  • Highland Fling, rock’ n’ rollin’ tappers and a teddy bear parade: Dance Arts Los Alamos’ youngest students will perform a program of dance at the annual Early Childhood Recital on Saturday.

    The public is invited to this free performance at 10 a.m. at Pion Elementary School Gymnasium in White Rock, followed by a cookies and punch reception to honor the young dancers.

  • Trinity on the Hill Episcopal Church’s thrift shop, the Shop on the Corner, has been a ministry of the parish from the early years.

    The shop is open on Wednesday mornings during the school year, but with school ending May 23, the shop is having a blow out sale the May 17. The hope is to empty the shelves and racks because there is no place to store items. What is not sold will be given away to regional charities. Donations will be accepted again after Aug. 1, as the shop prepares to reopen when school resumes.

  • At the upcoming Los Alamos Community Winds concert, two seasoned performers will be featured as soloists – and they haven’t even graduated from high school.

    Adam Nekimken, trombonist, and Kathy Lin, pianist, will each perform a solo piece during the concert, which will be held at 7 p.m. Saturday at the White Rock Baptist Church.

  • New Mexico Dance Theater will perform its fourth annual spring recital, “Mother Goose,” Friday and Saturday at Duane W. Smith Auditorium.

    “NMDT spring recitals offer a chance for every student from the age of 2 through adult to perform in the style of dance in which they take lessons on a weekly basis,” said NMDT director Susan Baker-Dillingham. “Recitals are each student’s opportunity to shine, and show their families and friends the improvements they have made during the year.”

  • Like the tabloid weeklies that taunt celebrities with pictures of their cellulite or pimples, “The Importance of Being Earnest” pokes fun of the people who got all the attention during the Victorian era in England, the aristocracy, by revealing their silliness and superficiality.

    A few hundred years later, the play has not gotten stale; the jokes are still as fresh and relevant as they were when the play was first performed in 1895.

  • Throughout the school year, Los Alamos High School bands have been playing the tune of success and were able to finish their victorious score during the New Mexico Activities Association State Concert Festival in April.

    The winds ensemble and symphonic band traveled to Cibola High School in Albuquerque to compete. While the symphonic band performed for comments only, the winds ensemble captured first place in the AAAA division.

  • On Saturday morning, the Los Alamos community is encouraged to leave something other than letters or bill payments in their mailboxes.

    The Los Alamos Letter Carriers Union (NALC-4112) will pick up nonperishable food items as part of the 16th Annual National Association of Letter Carriers National Food Drive. Los Alamos letter carriers will not be doing this alone; letter carriers in White Rock, along with the Northern New Mexico District of Boy Scouts of America, will be collecting food items for LA Cares.

  • Whether you love the movie or have never even heard of Rick Moranis, the Olions’ production of “Little Shop of Horrors” will have you laughing the antics, caring about the characters and applauding wildly, standing in front of your Duane W. Smith seat.

    I enjoyed so many elements of the musical I almost don’t know where to begin. But, since it is “Little Shop of Horrors,” I’ll start with the plant.

    The plant is awesome.

  • It started out as the annual spring barbecue for the Pion Elementary Arbor Day but when the event concluded, much more was accomplished than just eating lunch.

    Melanie McKinley, of the Pion Elementary School Parent Teacher Organization, said in addition to the barbecue, which Cub Scout Pack 326 cooked, students and about 60 parents got their hands dirty and the campus beautiful.

  • In a foreign country, with a tour group full of people you don’t know, sometimes the best thing you can do is go to the gym.

    I need to pause for a disclaimer: If I am a rat of any kind, it is not a gym rat. I’m a road rat, a trail rat, a barre rat – but I don’t like the machines, the musk, the towels, the TVs or any of the complimentary ambience that comes along with a trip to the gym. I can’t stand the sound of the treadmill, the way my face looks in the mirror while I run or the useless, tiny cups of water.

  • The Art Center at Fuller Lodge invites the public to the opening reception for its newest exhibit, Traditional Fine Arts and Crafts, from 5-7 p.m. Friday.

  • Russian architect and artist, Viktor Alexandrovich Hartmann, grew up in St. Petersburg. He studied at the Academy of Fine Arts in St. Petersburg and at first started working by illustrating books.

    In his work as an architect, he sketched, among other things, the monument to the 1,000th anniversary of Russia in Novgorod, which was inaugurated in 1862. His watercolors and pencil drawings were often made while traveling abroad from 1864-1868. Hartmann was one of the first artists to include traditional Russian motifs in his work.

  • Sunday celebrates Beltane, or May Day, the third and last of the ancient Pagan fertility festivals. The first, Imbolc, is the first stirrings of the new season. The second, Ostara, celebrated at the spring equinox, recognizes spring has arrived. In many northern climates it is still too early to plant. Beltane would be the time when northern communities would be getting ready for their planting season.

  • Janet Bosarge of Los Alamos may not paint or photograph, but she does know the art of marketing. To help promote several local artists’ works and the work of visiting artists, Bosarge is hosting a fine arts party from 10 a.m.-7 p.m. Saturday at her home, located at 2326 Canyon Glen.

    Artists whose works will show at the party include sculptor John Fleming of Kirkland, Wash., photographer Harry Clifford of Los Alamos, painter Stede Barber of Los Alamos, painter Beth Ferguson of Abquu and Barb Ruble of Washington.

  • Los Alamos Little Theatre presents its final play this season, “The Importance of Being Earnest,” by Oscar Wilde. On its surface, the play is about two young men and their courtship with their respective girlfriends in the time of Queen Victoria.

  • Join Juanita “Winnie” Madland for another pedagogical pianist concert-lecture, at 12:30 p.m. Wednesday at Fuller Lodge. The concert is a part of the free Los Alamos Arts Council Brown Bag series.