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Features

  • The animal kingdom is in trouble. Species are vanishing because of habitat loss, food chains are becoming unbalance and ecosystems are chaotic. To help restore the order, artist Geraldine Kerr is hosting an art show at Mesa Public Library.

    Twenty-six paintings each feature an animal that is endangered in alphabetical order. “The ABC’s of Endangered Animals” exhibit will open Thursday at the gallery. There will be an opening reception from 5:30-8:30 p.m. Thursday.

  • Shavu’ot is a harvest festival. It is a two-day holiday that falls seven weeks after the second night of Passover. In ancient Israel, it started with harvesting barley at Passover and before moving on to wheat at Shavu’ot. People would bring the first fruit of their fields to the Temple of Jerusalem.

  • Think reading is just for kids? Now that is just silly. Back by popular demand, the Los Alamos County Libraries will have a summer reading program not only for kids and teens, but for adults, too.

    Every year, the New Mexico State Library has a different theme for the Summer Reading program and children are invited to keep track of how long they read or listen to books to enjoy and win prizes.

    This year, the theme is “Catch the Reading Bug!” for younger kids and “Metamorphosis” for teens.

  • The work currently hanging on the walls of the Portal Gallery at the Art Center at Fuller Lodge is not typical artwork. It is neither paintings, or weavings but a combination of both.

    Producing art that strays outside any conventional definition is right up Maria Jonsson’s alley.

    “I just want to be different ... be more specialized,” she said.

  • The learning doesn’t have to stop just because the school year is completed. For instance, throughout this week, the schoolyard at Mountain Elementary School has been bustling with learning activity.

    About 120 girls from Girl Scout service units 22 and 23 have been exploring water Monday through today during the Twilight Camp with the help of about 50 volunteers.

  • For want of a few more students, the “Artistic Traditions of the Southwest” course at UNM-Los Alamos may be canceled, even if it is only $15 per senior citizen and standard tuition for others.

    “Three people have signed up so far but I’m getting worried because the class starts June 14,” instructor Carol Noones said Wednesday. “We need just four more people and we really hope the community will rally around this unique course and help us keep it open.”

  • The Waybacks have pulled in at No. 9 on the Americana Radio chart, just a few spots ahead of the South Austin Jug Band, a band Los Alamos audiences know well. At No. 4, the Waybacks stand four spots ahead of Tim O’Brien, another Los Alamos favorite, on Billboard’s Top Bluegrass Albums chart.

    The new album, “Loaded,” like the band itself, is doing very well.

    “These guys can play like bandits,” said Billboard’s Ray Waddell.

  • Always wanted to see Charlton Heston play a Mexican? You could have 40 years ago – but in this case, procrastination paid off.

    Mesa Public Library’s Free Film Series will present “Touch of Evil” at 6:30 a.m. Thursday in the upstairs rotunda, a 1958 film retouched in the late ’90s in order to bring the movie as closely as possible to director Orson Welles’ vision for it.

  • Sandy Nininger died a hero’s death at the Battle of Bataan only one month after the United States entered World War II. His actions during the first few days of fighting may have changed the entire course of the war in the Pacific, for which Congress honored Nininger posthumously with the Medal of Honor.

    Nininger was a Key Club member and is honored annually by the Southwest District through the Sandy Nininger Award. The recipient is a Key Club member who has distinguished himself/herself by making the most of his/her opportunities.

  • It’s halftime. The crowd wanders off to beers and bathrooms. The starters refocus. The benchwarmers listen earnestly to the coach, just in case. I stare at the scoreboard, illiterate as a pair of eyeglasses in a purse. This is my game, my field, my team and my audience. But what am I? Do I play or do I grow like the grass, barely aware of the painted lines?

  • His eyes quickly focused on the glowing digits of the clock, which read 4:30 a.m., as he grabbed the ringing handset.

    The voice at the other end of the line said, “Mark, this is the State Rescue Center. A day hiker was reported missing last night in the mountains east of Taos. We need you off the ground at first light, find the hiker and vector in the jet chopper to get him out. Can you do it?"

  • History holds some fascinating stories and a group of Los Alamos High School students are sharing a few of these tales, from a group of poverty-stricken Pennsylvania miners with criminal intentions to two estranged countries opening up to diplomatic relations through a game of ping-pong.

    These students not only caught people’s attention to these moments in history, but they also won awards.

  • The Los Alamos Concert Association presents a “Jewel of a Season” for 2008-2009 five performances by world-renowned artists. Save gas, entertainment money, and see and hear world-class artists in Los Alamos.

    The season opens at 4 p.m. Sept. 14, with a performance by the Jupiter String Quartet.

    The Jupiter String Quartet was recently awarded the Cleveland Quartet Award, a prize, which “honors and promotes a rising young string quartet whose artistry demonstrates that it is in the process of establishing a major career.”

  • Parenting never seems like an easy task; there appear to be many opportunities for your hair to bristle, but there is an alternative to pulling it out by the roots.

    Trinity on the Hill Episcopal Church and Bethlehem Evangelical Lutheran Church are sponsoring two parenting classes, titled “Parenting in the 21st Century: A Perspective on Sanity in a Crazy World.”

  • It has been nearly 20 years since Indiana Jones graced our screens in “The Last Crusade.” After many years of speculation and numerous rewrites of the screenplay, Steven Spielberg has once again teamed up with the all- star cast of Harrison Ford, Karen Allen and now Shia LaBeouf and Cate Blanchett to tell a new story of the famous archeologist and his quest for hidden treasure.

    In this latest film, Indiana races against a group of Russian KGB to try and obtain the mythical crystal skull from an ancient South American kingdom.

  • Dance Arts Los Alamos (DALA) requests the honor of the public’s presence at a “sweet 16” celebration.

    DALA, founded in 1992, invites the community to the 2008 Spring Showcase Recital with free admission for all. The annual recital, which features the artistry of DALA’s older dancers, will be performed at 7 p.m. Saturday at Duane W. Smith Auditorium.

  • The second Heritage Partners Annual Campaign for the Los Alamos Historical Society is under way. This year’s theme, “$40,000 for the Museum’s 40th,” celebrates the 40th anniversary of the Los Alamos Historical Museum, which opened in July 1968.

    “The annual campaign is critical this year because a three-year grant we received for Manhattan Project preservation has been completed,” Museum Director Hedy Dunn said. “We are counting on the community and our members to help us keep the momentum going that started with the grant.”

  • Ronn Stewart, artistic director of Moving People Dance of Santa Fe, is returning to familiar turf.

    When his nonprofit dance company performs at 2 p.m. Sunday at Duane Smith Auditorium, Stewart will be able to see his old workplace. For three years, he was the co-artistic director of Dance Arts Los Alamos (DALA). Seven years ago, he started Moving People, and although he left the local area, Stewart said he was able to apply his experiences in Los Alamos to the Santa Fe company.

    Plus, students from DALA, such as Andrew Silks, travel to Moving People to take classes.

  • Going green

    Earth Day 2008, which was organized by Pajarito Environmental Education Center (PEEC) and took place April 22 and the weekend of April 26-27, was an outstanding success due to the efforts of a large number of volunteers and the support of many sponsors. This letter is to thank all of these volunteers and sponsors and those who attended one of our events this year.

  • Summer in New York meant long drives on the state thruway, huddled with my friend Angela on two little seats my dad had built for us in the backseat of the family pickup truck, which was black, just like the one I drive today.

    We’d listen to Casey Kasem’s “American Top 40” with the windows down. I would pet the labrador’s giant head while my parents talked and sang “Peggy Sue” or “Spooky” up front.