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Features

  • Uli’s Cottontails is hosting a competition that requires skill, creativity, thought and lots of Legos. The annual Lego design competition allows young people to prove their strengths as builders with the plastic primary-colored blocks.

  • Los Alamos Public Schools’ physical condition could get some healing through a potential 20-year facility plan, but not all classrooms will be given attention.

    “It’s just a matter of priority,” explained Los Alamos Public School Foundation board member Morrie Pongratz. For instance, at Los Alamos High School, the plan addresses B, C and D wings, but not E-wing, the location for science classrooms.

  • 4. The pay is fabulous

    Seriously: Columbia Pictures paid Scott Rosenberg $1.2 million just to rewrite his own script, titled “Black Ice,” in 2000. Of course, he had a bit of an amazing track record with “High Fidelity,” “Con Air,” “Gone in Sixty Seconds” and “The Sentinel.” Nevertheless, since “Black Ice” remains unproduced, it’s hard to say whether he deserved it.

  • Amateur radio operators will be broadcasting across the country and throughout the world this weekend.

    About 20 operators from Los Alamos Amateur Radio Club will be setting up stations, hooking up generators and transmitting their voices on radio waves from North Mesa Picnic Grounds to hone and sharpen their skills.

    In 24 hours, the operators will attempt to make as many contacts as possible.

  • Janet Bosarge is preparing to move out of the area, but not before throwing one last art party. Bosarge’s fine arts party will be held from 11 a.m.-6 p.m. Saturday at her home, located at 2326 Canyon Glen.

    The art show will feature Los Alamos artists Mary Carol Williams and Ellen Randall. Sculpturor and photographer John Fleming, photographer Harry Clifford, oil painter Stede Barber, watercolor painter Barb Ruble and artist Christina Boyce of Des Moines, will also show their work at the party.

  • Primary colors will decorate the Kiwanis’ Fourth of July celebration; splashes of red, white and blue set aglow by glittery fireworks, will fill up Overlook Park July 4. The spectacle, which gathers together about 15,000 people, has been held for 30 years. Its origins started around the 1960s and began with a man interested in bringing a Fourth of July celebration, like the one from his home town, to Los Alamos.

  • He seems to like us and we definitely like him.

    Greg Abate (pronounced “Ah-bot-tay”) has been to the Hill a number of times, drawing enthusiast jazz fans from all over the mesas. He returns at 7 p.m. Friday at the intersection of Central Avenue and Main Street, under the auspices of the Los Alamos County Summer Concert Series.

  • Riding in style

    My wife and I paid our first visit to Los Alamos last year. We thoroughly enjoyed our visit, the scenery was wonderful and the people were very friendly. The only downside was the lack of public transport, which meant we were dependent on our son to take us wherever we wanted to go.

  • 4. Writers are unhappy.

    I know this is a stereotype. I also know it’s true. Just look at a writer’s photo – just about any writer’s photo. They frown. They brood. They burn the camera with their heavy-lidded eyes. They look brilliant – but goofy? Fun-loving? Ebullient? I don’t think so.

    Here’s the thing. We all ponder the universe from time to time. We reflect on our values. We search our souls for a good answer to the question, “What does it all mean?”

    We are all deep.

    You know, sometimes.

  • The New TOPS Club Inc. (Take Off Pounds Sensibly) Chapter will have its first meeting from 5:40-7 p.m. Thursday at the Los Alamos United Methodist Church. The new chapter will meet every Thursday. It will be starting off with some positive news.

    The numbers have been tabulated and the results are in. Members of TOPS Club Inc. lost a total of 951,902 pounds or 476 tons last year. Members in the state of New Mexico shed 2,693.75 pounds. The queen lost 62.25 pounds to goal.

  • When John and June Warren went on their honeymoon, they would later call their vacation spot “home.” Los Alamos is more than just the place where John started his career at the laboratory or the location of June’s Montessori school,  Ponderosa Montessori (formerly Sage Montessori). Los Alamos marks the beginning of their marriage.

    Fifty years later, as John and June celebrated their anniversary June 7 with friends, their daughters, their granddaughter and several cousins, they reminisced about the start of their life together.

  • Ricko Donovan will make his Guitars and Gateaux concert series debut with a hybrid of music. He refers to this musical mesh as Americeltic.

    To perform this type of music, Donovan plays the guitar and the hammered dulcimer.

    The hammered dulcimer, series coordinator Greg Schneider, explained is very different from the dulcimer, which a musician lays in his or her lap and plays like guitar.

  • Since moving to Los Alamos two summers ago, I’ve heard many stories from folks who lived through the days of the great fire of 2000. The Cerro Grande fire changed the landscape of Los Alamos and the mountains surrounding it for decades to come. Not only did the fire cause erosion by burning down vegetation, it also damaged the soil.

  • An instructor with rich experience in England and the United States in acting, directing and teaching Shakespearean theatre will lead a workshop this weekend at the Los Alamos Little Theatre (LALT).

    The workshop, to be held from 1-5 p.m. Saturday, is open to all participants, but those who plan to audition for Macbeth (LALT November production) are especially encouraged to attend.

  • John and Jean Lyman of Los Alamos figured they have a good life.

  • Is it better to write about what you know or to remain uninhibited by personal experience? Why write a play instead of a different form?

    Robert Benjamin will discuss these and other questions as the first playwright to present in Mesa Public Library’s Author Speak Series. The free event will take place at 7 p.m. Thursday in the upstairs rotunda.

    “If the audience wants to talk about process,” Benjamin said, “I can go there. Why don’t I write a novel? I can go there. I need some direction from the audience.”

  • If you’ve always wondered what exactly is meant by an art quilt, the “Seams Unusual” show, opening Friday at the Art Center at Fuller Lodge, should go a long way to clearing up the mystery.

    Seventeen New Mexico artists from all over the state have chosen this emerging medium to portray their artistic vision.

  • Patrick Sweany will be playing at 7 p.m. Friday in the Los Alamos National Bank parking lot as part of the Gordons’ Productions and Los Alamos County’s Summer Concert Series.

    I caught Sweany on the phone just as he was cruising down I-80 in the middle of Nebraska. Since his gig in Omaha, he’d been pulled over a couple of times by the cops. He figured they saw a long haired guy driving a beat up van and wanted to check things out. The cops didn’t find any drugs. No sex either. Just three guys listening to rock and roll.

  • VaLynn Purvis always had a knack for fun. From an early age she had an interest in games and activities with children and families.

    This interest in fun led her to establish her own business, Party to Go! in Los Alamos. The business was formed two years ago. In the past, she has participated in Fourth of July Carnival at the Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints Church and offered balloon animals and games at activities at Chamisa and Pion elementary schools. Party To Go! offers its services at family and high school reunions, and kids’ birthday parties.

  • A woman with long silver hair – silver like unicorns, not bracelets – jumped to feet, shouting and clapping her hands above her head. She might have been crazy, I really don’t know. She was enthusiastic. The rest of us remained seated. But while she jumped and screamed compliments toward the podium, we clapped.

    A lot.

    Like you would after a great bit of stand-up comedy.

    Like you would after a particularly rousing line at a political rally.

    This was unlike any other poetry reading I’ve ever attended.