.....Advertisement.....
.....Advertisement.....

Features

  • Plastic bags have really left a mark on the environment. They are made from petroleum, harmful to animals, and rather than bio-degrading, plastic bags are photodegradable; the sun breaks the bags into smaller and smaller parts, but these pieces never go away.

    As a result, members of the Pajarito Envrionmental Education Center’s Kinnikinnick Club, a nature club for students in grade four through six, are working to wipe away the mark left by plastic bags on the environment.

  • Classical and folk art, along with history, are intertwined within delicate and elaborate patterns of lace in the “Handmade Lace: From Fine Art to Folk Art” exhibit at Mesa Public Library.

    If visitors are looking at the black Spanish mantilla or the 1680 Italian “snow lace” and wonder just how these pieces of art were created, an answer will be provided soon. The New Mexico Enchanted Lacers will host demonstrations on lace-making techniques all day Saturday at the library.

  • You watched the match, right? Clicked the TV on at 7 a.m. Sunday morning, without even lifting your head? Eventually rubbed your eyes, rolled your pillow in half so you could lean back on it and see the screen, and realized you forgot to take your contacts out the night before?

    You watched what many people are saying was the best tennis match ever.

  • Wondering what is the sweetest class that the Pajarito Environmental Education Center will be offering this summer? Without a doubt, it is the classes on beekeeping with local honey man Scott Mills of Mariposa Apiaries in Los Alamos.

    The first of the two classes is offered for those who are interested in learning more about honeybees and beekeeping in general. Topics in this two-hour introductory course will include life inside the beehive, the honeybee life cycle, the importance of honeybees, and protective clothing and basic equipment needed for getting started.

  • Everyone’s career has some type of significance; whether it is a trash collector who ensures neighborhoods and city streets remain sanitary and clean or a police officer who maintains everyone’s safety. From the long list of potential occupations to support through a scholarship, Steve and Barbara Stoddard selected two – teaching and nursing.

  • Going through cancer treatment changes how a person looks and feels. This, in turn, can modify ones’ actions, relationships and life. If you are going through cancer treatment and want to be more comfortable in society again, realize you are not alone.

    A 2006 on-line survey conducted by the Cincinnati-based research firm R.L. Repass & Partners Inc. showed that a 69 percent majority of 400 female cancer patients said their appearance changed either somewhat or a lot during chemotherapy or radiation.

  • To anyone who thinks a library is just books, its time to look between the shelves because the Los Alamos County Library System is about to prove just how cool it really is. The rock ’n’ roll band, The High Strung is coming to perform, along with the local band, The Small Town Lab Rats.

    The free concert will be held at 7 p.m. Wednesday at Fuller Lodge and is sponsored by the county libraries and funded in part by the Friends of the Library.

  • “The Marriage of Figaro” has been one of the world’s most popular operas almost since its first production in Vienna 222 years ago. Through Mozart’s immortal music, never more sublimely simple, and the revolutionary, politically-incorrect play of Beaumarchais, the complex depths of the human heart are plumbed under the deceptively pleasing guise of romantic farce. Nobody dies, true love triumphs and everyone is paired off appropriately.

  • Possessing intellect is not the only vital component to being successful in science; having fun is also essential.

    A team of Los Alamos Middle School eighth-graders put this theory to the test during the regional and national Science Bowl competitions, and their conclusion revealed enjoyment and brains are equally important.

  • While members of Trinity on the Hill Episcopal Church and Bethlehem Lutheran Evangelical Church prepare to host the annual Vacation Bible School and Day Camp, which will be held July 7-11, the House of Hope Women are making preparations for the annual Vacation Bible School evening family dinner.

  • What would you do? You’re a middle-aged woman living in a big, suburban home. You and your husband have four daughters, one in high school, one in college and two in-between. Then one evening, your husband doesn’t come home – the same day, you find out, his secretary runs off to Sweden with her mysterious lover.

    In Mike Binder’s “The Upside of Anger,” this is Terry Wolfmeyer’s (Joan Allen) situation. She decides to get mad.

    And she finds a few things  to keep her furious.

  • UNM-Los Alamos will bring college to kids in first through sixth grade this summer.

    “We love having the kids on campus,” said Community Education Coordinator Eileen Gallegos. “The enthusiasm they have for learning is always inspiring.”

  • TESUQUE, N.M. – The Santa Fe Opera’s new production of “Falstaff” opened the season Friday night with all the camp and circumstance befitting Giusseppe Verdi’s comic masterpiece, based on Shakespeare’s shameless, big-bellied rascal.

    The Falstaff of the two-part “Henry IV,” called back for his own show in the “Merry Wives of Windsor, “has the patent on the role of the most deplorably loveable, gluttonous reprobate of all time.

  • Uli’s Cottontails is hosting a competition that requires skill, creativity, thought and lots of Legos. The annual Lego design competition allows young people to prove their strengths as builders with the plastic primary-colored blocks.

  • Los Alamos Public Schools’ physical condition could get some healing through a potential 20-year facility plan, but not all classrooms will be given attention.

    “It’s just a matter of priority,” explained Los Alamos Public School Foundation board member Morrie Pongratz. For instance, at Los Alamos High School, the plan addresses B, C and D wings, but not E-wing, the location for science classrooms.

  • 4. The pay is fabulous

    Seriously: Columbia Pictures paid Scott Rosenberg $1.2 million just to rewrite his own script, titled “Black Ice,” in 2000. Of course, he had a bit of an amazing track record with “High Fidelity,” “Con Air,” “Gone in Sixty Seconds” and “The Sentinel.” Nevertheless, since “Black Ice” remains unproduced, it’s hard to say whether he deserved it.

  • Amateur radio operators will be broadcasting across the country and throughout the world this weekend.

    About 20 operators from Los Alamos Amateur Radio Club will be setting up stations, hooking up generators and transmitting their voices on radio waves from North Mesa Picnic Grounds to hone and sharpen their skills.

    In 24 hours, the operators will attempt to make as many contacts as possible.

  • Janet Bosarge is preparing to move out of the area, but not before throwing one last art party. Bosarge’s fine arts party will be held from 11 a.m.-6 p.m. Saturday at her home, located at 2326 Canyon Glen.

    The art show will feature Los Alamos artists Mary Carol Williams and Ellen Randall. Sculpturor and photographer John Fleming, photographer Harry Clifford, oil painter Stede Barber, watercolor painter Barb Ruble and artist Christina Boyce of Des Moines, will also show their work at the party.

  • Primary colors will decorate the Kiwanis’ Fourth of July celebration; splashes of red, white and blue set aglow by glittery fireworks, will fill up Overlook Park July 4. The spectacle, which gathers together about 15,000 people, has been held for 30 years. Its origins started around the 1960s and began with a man interested in bringing a Fourth of July celebration, like the one from his home town, to Los Alamos.

  • He seems to like us and we definitely like him.

    Greg Abate (pronounced “Ah-bot-tay”) has been to the Hill a number of times, drawing enthusiast jazz fans from all over the mesas. He returns at 7 p.m. Friday at the intersection of Central Avenue and Main Street, under the auspices of the Los Alamos County Summer Concert Series.