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Features

  • During this particular time of year, with its many holidays, it seems required that music be played to fully celebrate all the festivities.

    For one particular holiday, Christmas, the sound of brass instruments might be the perfect way to fulfill this requirement.

    Therefore, the community is invited to attend a free brass concert at 7:30 p.m. Saturday at Immaculate Heart of Mary Church.

  • Many people know the concept of the healing nature of the Southwest’s dry, sunny climate, but few perhaps recognize that so many immigrants to the region came because of lung ailments or that the treatment of tuberculosis subsequently became a major industry.

    A new, temporary exhibit that examines these themes is on display during the month of December at the Los Alamos Historical Museum.

  • It may be camouflaged in powdery white snow, but there seems to be a real art to winter walking.

    I was greeted with a surprise when I walked out the door on Tuesday morning; my car was up to its wheels in snow and with no snow shovel at my disposal, I decided to walk to the office. Along the way, I saw art all around me – patterns of shoe soles sculpted the snow, the streets were molded with intricate, slushy, textured designs made by tire treads and even the sky was an abstract painting of grays and whites.

  • Albuquerque – Jeff Sargent of Los Alamos was one of several maintenance staff who earned a 2008 Ben Luján Maintenance Achievement Award. In total, eight school districts and 19 district staffers, received awards. The school districts that received awards were Aztec, Carlsbad, Gadsden, Peñasco, Roswell, Silver, Tatum and Truth or Consequences.

  • Confused about how our public schools are funded? You’re not alone! A convergence of three major events will affect Los Alamos Public Schools (LAPS) for many years to come. They are distinctly different, and need to be kept separate, not only in the practice of acquiring and spending funds, but also in the understanding of how these funds can be used.

  • This week, we look at Asset number 32, Planning and Decision Making. According to the Search-Institute, “Youth are more likely to grow up healthy when they know how to plan ahead and make choices.”

    For those of you who know me well, I’ll take a short pause to allow time for you to guffaw. I do get an awful lot done, but I’ll tell you, that it is by the grace of God that things get accomplished and it has very little to do with me.

  • As a core member of the Austin-based Conspirare, Nicole Lamartine has just received two Grammy Award nominations for the professional chorale ensemble’s recent CD, “Threshold of Night.” The nominations are for Best Classical Album and Best Choral Performance.

    “I was so excited,” said Lamartine during a telephone interview from Wyoming. “We are such a tight knit group and the second it came out I got an e-mail. It’s such an honor.”

  • The Alexander Girard collection at the Museum of International Folk Art in Santa Fe is not filled with glittery gems or shiny gold pieces that once belonged to royalty. No, this is a different type of collection.

  • Surveys have indicated that when looking for things to do, young people like to head over to a bowling alley and the Los Alamos Recreation Department is working to satisfy this interest.

    From 9 p.m. - midnight Friday, the recreation staff is inviting ninth- through 12th-graders to the Strike Gold Bowling Center at the Cities of Gold Casino, located at 10 D Cities of Gold Road in Pojoaque. Tickets will be sold for $7 Friday at the Los Alamos High School and then for $10 at the door.

  • The holiday season does not always evenly distribute its fruits to everyone. Fortunately, there are people in Los Alamos who recognize this fact and take action.

    Rae Douglas began the Christmas box program to collect items and food for people in Española Valley; partly as a result of her work and knowledge of people in the Valley, Los Alamos First United Methodist Church began its own Christmas box program 20 years ago.

  • Dance Arts Los Alamos just wrapped up its performances of “The Nutcracker,” but this magical Christmas tale can still be experienced in Los Alamos.

    The Los Alamos Community Winds will perform P.I. Tchaikovsky’s suite from “The Nutcracker,” at 2 p.m. Sunday at the Betty Ehart Senior Center.

    The suite will feature seven to eight separate movements from the “The Nutcracker.” These movements include the “Chinese Dance” and the “Arabian Dance.”

  • It seems a common misconception that there is a limitation for what young people can do. Adults are known for saying “You’re only a child,” or “You’re too young,” as though the amount of capabilities only grow as a person’s age increases. However, teenagers have a knack for proving this misconception wrong.

  • Jennifer Necker, a Piñon Elementary School fourth-grader, has made good on a promise that she would one day show a dog at the American Kennel Club National Championship Dog Show. Necker, a member of the Los Alamos Dog Obedience Club and the English Setter Association of America, will be showing an English Setter at the show in Long Beach, Calif., Saturday.

  • The New Mexico Dance Theater Performance Company (NMDT-PC), directed by Susan Baker-Dillingham, wishes to thank the Los Alamos community for its support during the recent NMDT-PC production of “The Wonderful Wizard of Oz.”

    Baker-Dillingham invited three other nonprofit organizations to work in artistic conjunction with three main characters from the ballet.

  • The Family Strengths Network is valuable in many ways, but this month, things will get even more significant with an event called, Special Saturdays. The program is for parents raising children with special needs, which can be either developmental or physical.

    The Family Resource Center, located at 1990 Diamond Drive and operated by Family Strengths Network staff provides the opportunity for interaction courtesy of Los Alamos National Bank.

    Rebecca Hollis of White Rock is thrilled to have the opportunity for her child that is stress free from the parent perspective.

  • Los Alamos Dance Arts’ 2008 production of Tchaikovsky’s “The Nutcracker” demonstrates why the ballet is a beloved part of every holiday season. DALA’s version is the most ambitious and well-done amateur production of the traditional Nutcracker that you are likely to see this year.

  • Out damn spot!

    An old theme with a hundred new meanings binds the Santa Fe Film Festival.

    Three days into the five-day Santa Fe Film Festival, I got a handle on what the event was all about this year.

    Not that 250 films, each little spark flying in a different direction, can be summed up easily without a trace of subjective wrangling, especially when one has only seen a small fraction of the work.

    I didn’t realize until later the obvious fact that a theme by definition would have to be there at the beginning and suffused throughout.

  • “A Mid Winter Night’s Dream, or The Night They Missed the Forest for the Trees,” by Nancy Linehan Charles, an abbreviated version of a familiar Shakespeare comedy, will be performed at 7 p.m. Friday and Saturday at Duane Smith Auditorium.

    Admission is $5 for adults and $3 for children age 12 and younger and seniors age 60 and older. Tickets are available at the door and from cast members.

  • We look at a tough topic this week, Asset #31, Restraint. According to the Search-Institute, “Youth are more likely to grow up healthy when they believe it is important not to be sexually active or to use alcohol or other drugs.”

    The key to being successful in this area is conversation and education. When I sat on a local board looking at poor youth choices, I suggested that we get some kids to join us that were in trouble and not just high achievers. There were adults in the room that looked at me as if I were from another planet.

  • Last year, the First United Methodist Church’s Mission and Outreach Work Group under the leadership of Dennis and Susan Trumblee recognized how much the community needs to let police officers and firefighters know how important they are and how much they are appreciated for what they do.

    As a result, the first Appreciation Dinner was organized for them in December 2007. A meal was served to all the firefighters and police officers who were able to attend. The menu included salmon, steak, baked potatoes and salad. Each of them also took home fresh homemade cookies.