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Features

  • The New Mexico Dance Theater Performance Company (NMDT-PC), directed by Susan Baker-Dillingham, wishes to thank the Los Alamos community for its support during the recent NMDT-PC production of “The Wonderful Wizard of Oz.”

    Baker-Dillingham invited three other nonprofit organizations to work in artistic conjunction with three main characters from the ballet.

  • The Family Strengths Network is valuable in many ways, but this month, things will get even more significant with an event called, Special Saturdays. The program is for parents raising children with special needs, which can be either developmental or physical.

    The Family Resource Center, located at 1990 Diamond Drive and operated by Family Strengths Network staff provides the opportunity for interaction courtesy of Los Alamos National Bank.

    Rebecca Hollis of White Rock is thrilled to have the opportunity for her child that is stress free from the parent perspective.

  • Los Alamos Dance Arts’ 2008 production of Tchaikovsky’s “The Nutcracker” demonstrates why the ballet is a beloved part of every holiday season. DALA’s version is the most ambitious and well-done amateur production of the traditional Nutcracker that you are likely to see this year.

  • Out damn spot!

    An old theme with a hundred new meanings binds the Santa Fe Film Festival.

    Three days into the five-day Santa Fe Film Festival, I got a handle on what the event was all about this year.

    Not that 250 films, each little spark flying in a different direction, can be summed up easily without a trace of subjective wrangling, especially when one has only seen a small fraction of the work.

    I didn’t realize until later the obvious fact that a theme by definition would have to be there at the beginning and suffused throughout.

  • “A Mid Winter Night’s Dream, or The Night They Missed the Forest for the Trees,” by Nancy Linehan Charles, an abbreviated version of a familiar Shakespeare comedy, will be performed at 7 p.m. Friday and Saturday at Duane Smith Auditorium.

    Admission is $5 for adults and $3 for children age 12 and younger and seniors age 60 and older. Tickets are available at the door and from cast members.

  • We look at a tough topic this week, Asset #31, Restraint. According to the Search-Institute, “Youth are more likely to grow up healthy when they believe it is important not to be sexually active or to use alcohol or other drugs.”

    The key to being successful in this area is conversation and education. When I sat on a local board looking at poor youth choices, I suggested that we get some kids to join us that were in trouble and not just high achievers. There were adults in the room that looked at me as if I were from another planet.

  • Last year, the First United Methodist Church’s Mission and Outreach Work Group under the leadership of Dennis and Susan Trumblee recognized how much the community needs to let police officers and firefighters know how important they are and how much they are appreciated for what they do.

    As a result, the first Appreciation Dinner was organized for them in December 2007. A meal was served to all the firefighters and police officers who were able to attend. The menu included salmon, steak, baked potatoes and salad. Each of them also took home fresh homemade cookies.

  • Dance Arts Los Alamos (DALA) is proud to present its 13th production of “The Nutcracker” as part of Los Alamos’ Winterfest weekend. Based on the story, “The Nutcracker and the King of Mice” by E.T.A. Hoffman, and set to the beloved music by Piotr Ilyich Tchaikovsky, the ballet tells the story of Clara, her enigmatic Godfather Drosselmeyer and the magical nutcracker doll he brings her as a Christmas gift. “The Nutcracker” was first performed on Dec. 18, 1892 in St.

  • Nina Saunders, director of the Olions Thespian Club, is taking a back seat on this certain production. While Saunders watches, her students are taking over the stage and therefore, learning what it takes to run a show.

    Los Alamos residents can see what the young thespians are capable of during the one act performances.

    The show begins at 7 p.m. Friday at the Topper Theatre. The performances continue at 7 p.m. Saturday and Sunday as well as Dec. 12, and 13. There will be a matinee performance at 2 p.m. Sunday. Tickets cost $10 for adults and $5 for seniors.

  • My first memories of holiday tunes were the ones that my family would sing as the days approached Dec. 25. The four of us would be in the car and we would all belt out some song, or after the Christmas Eve dinner at my aunt and uncle’s house, we would begin caroling around the table.

    As I grew older, when December would roll around, my family would turn to the professionals. A Peter, Paul and Mary tape would constantly play in the car and my mother would often put Emmylou Harris’ holiday CD or the Kingston Trio’s Christmas CD on her CD player in the house.

  • Just because you grow up doesn’t mean all the fun, mystery and magic in life has to cease and be locked away with childhood memories. There is always new adventures waiting to be experienced, and excitement lying within the day’s events; all that is needed is a little faith.

    “Finding Neverland” proves this point. James M. Barrie (Johnny Depp) is dealing with some adult blues. He is a playwright who has just had a flop and his marriage is failing.

  • As a feature of Barranca Elementary School’s fifth and sixth grade GATE classes’ global outreach, students learn about how some children in Cambodia do not have schools, or teachers and often not enough to eat.

    In response, Barranca students are collaborating with Cambodia’s Hope, a local charity supporting schools and orphans in Cambodia to help children on the other side of the globe by supporting the Alphabet Soup program where just 78 cents per day supports a child in school and gives them a nutritious meal.

  • At 5:30 p.m. Friday at Piñon Elementary School, students will be putting their skills in strategy and planning to the test. The competition is not in the form of an athletic game or speech debate, but takes place on a checkered board with knights, queens and pawns.

    The Los Alamos area elementary chess tournament has been held three times throughout the year, and the final rounds for this year will be held Friday.

  • The annual Los Alamos County Science Fair will take place on Jan. 24 in the Los Alamos High School cafeteria. The public is invited to view the projects between 12:30-2 p.m.

    Students in grades kindergarten through 12th grade will display their projects in elementary class, junior and senior divisions.

    The elementary projects are divided into three categories. The students in junior and senior divisions will compete for first, second and third place in 17 categories.

  • The House of Hope Women has begun its Ways and Means Projects for securing funding for the next October house-building trip to Júarez, Chihuahua, Mexico.

    A raffle is the first of the projects that the group is sponsoring – an opportunity to win one of three different items.

  • There is no need to spend Thanksgiving strapped in an apron or elbows deep in a sink full of dishes.

    An opportunity is available to enjoy the food and company that Thanksgiving provides without all the grunt work.

    The Los Alamos Elks in conjunction with the American Legion and VFW are sponsoring a Thanksgiving Dinner from 11:30 a.m.-2:30 p.m. Thursday at the Elks Lodge, which is located at 1600 Trinity Drive, across from Sonic.

    A traditional Thanksgiving meal will be served free of charged to anyone who would like to attend.

  • The original Holiday Arts and Crafts Fair is here and it will be better than ever.

    A Los Alamos tradition for 41 years, the annual Holiday Arts and Crafts Fair will be held from 9 a.m.–3:30 p.m. Saturday at the Los Alamos Middle School.

  • According to Petr Jandacek’s philosophy, when life hands out lemons, make lemonade and when life hands out willow trees, make willow wizards.

    This philosophy was put into practice when a willow tree at Piñon Elementary School, where Jandacek works as an art teacher, had to be cut down because its roots were damaging sewer lines.

  • When I was in high school, my mother and I attended almost every traveling Broadway musical show that came to Denver. She bought the tickets as Christmas or birthday presents but there was another gift, the opportunity to share the show with her.

    I always remember our car rides back home; we would talk about the show the whole way.

  • The annual Festival of Trees will kick the holiday season into high gear Saturday.

    The jam-packed event, held each year from 10 a.m.-2 p.m. at the Betty Ehart Senior Center, is a fundraiser for the Community Health Council and Los Alamos Retired and Senior Organization (LARSO).

    “I was amazed by how many trees we got this year,” said Michelangelo Lobato, Community Health Council coordinator. “They are all beautiful, and we are fortunate to be in a community where so many people will take the time to participate.”