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Features

  • Tito Rios and Petra Babankova of Sol y Luna Guitar Duo unveiled an original composition during their Guitar and Gateaux concert last year. This year, they are back in the guitar series with more original music.

    Sol y Luna will be showing off their composing skills during the first Guitar and Gateaux show of the season, which will be held from 7-8:30 p.m. Thursday at Fuller Lodge. The Los Alamos Arts Council (LAAC) is sponsoring the show.

    Rios said they are looking forward to this show, after their successful performance last year.

  • He’s becoming New Mexico’s own John Grisham. As Grisham steadily sends out streams of best-selling legal crime thrillers, Michael McGarrity is popular for his detective series.

    His first novel about retired detective Kevin Kearny came out in 1996 and the character has been solving one mystery after another in books published pretty much every year since.

    “He’s one of New Mexico’s most famous mystery writers,” said Carol Meine of Mesa Public Library.

  • There’s an old saying that goes, “a journey begins with a single step.” This statement is especially true for a group of five people from Prague, Czech Republic, and their four Velorex vehicles.

    However, instead of their journey beginning with a single step, it started with the group shipping their cars to the U.S. in preparation for their 2,450-mile trip along the “Mother Road.”

  • The autumnal equinox is a harvest festival celebrated by pagans and Wiccans. The sun’s crossing the celestial equator from north to south at about 9:45 a.m. Monday marks the pivotal point at which the day and night are of equal measure.

    Briefly, the balance of light and dark as the daylight begins to wane and the nights to wax is observed. There’s no doubt about it: Fall has arrived.

  • Taste the zip of a Feta crumble tucked into a fresh tomato. Smell the golden spanakopita, stuffed with spinach. Take a bite of baklava from the recipe of YiaYia Maria Marros and savor the flaky layers of honey and nuts.

    At 5 p.m. Sunday, the members of the St. Dimitri of Rostov Orthodox Church will host a dinner for the community where they will serve a sampling of ethnic and Mediterranean dishes.

  • Last year, the elementary schools took a literary road trip; this year their reading excursion will lead school staff and students into the jungle.

    Aspen Elementary School will begin its safari trek today with the Scholastic Book Fair running from 3:15-4 p.m.

    The fair will continue from 8-8:30 a.m. and then again from 3:15-4 p.m. daily through Sept. 24.

    Another opportunity to participate in the fair will be from 11:30-1:30 p.m. Sept. 23 during the Aspen’s Parent Teacher Organization’s (PTO) Family Picnic Event.

  • The opportunity to learn a few new dance steps has arrived. The Roaring Jelly band will be hosting a contra dance Saturday at the Unitarian Church.

    An instructional session will begin at 6:30 p.m. followed by a dance at 7 p.m.

    Mark Petersen, who plays the accordion in the band, encourages the community to participate.

    “I think for the dancer, the appeal is you can learn the moves in the first half-hour,” he said.

  • At first, there were not enough people in the theater to even qualify as a handful. A couple had the front section to themselves, while the upper half was completely vacant. The scarce attendance did not seem like a good sign, and the reason appeared mysterious because other Los Alamos Little Theater’s (LALT) productions usually attract a full house.

  • Local writers spotlight a piece of history that is right in our downtown area. Craig Martin and Heather McClenahan address the artifacts from another era in their book, “Of Logs and Stone: The Buildings of the Los Alamos Ranch School and Bathtub Row.”

    The Los Alamos Historical Museum will host a book-signing event for the authors from 5:30-7 p.m. Monday.

    The book features the history of and stories about the oldest buildings in Los Alamos—Fuller Lodge and the smaller structures in the downtown National Landmark District.

  • If anyone needs a lesson about how to write anything from an essay to a script “short and sweet,” they should turn to Los Alamos Little Theater (LALT) for some guidance. After viewing the community theater’s latest production, “8x10 Again,” it is clear they are the masters at making the most out of a short amount of time.

    Eight plays are featured in the short play festival but the catch is all of them are only 10-minutes long.

  • Reserve a place at the Saint Dimitri Orthodox Church’s community dinner, which will be at 5 p.m. Sunday at United Church of Los Alamos, by calling 661-7466. Seating is restricted to the first 75 people and there is a suggested donation of $15 for adults and $5 for children age 10 and younger.

  • The local YMCA hopes that they can inspire Los Alamos residents to get on their feet this weekend to kick off America on the Move Week.

    America on the Move Week will be held Saturday through Sept. 27, with a goal to surpass the number of footsteps participants logged in 2007 by 20 million.

    “All you have to do to participate in this event is come into the YMCA or the Teen Center in Espaola and sign up to participate and you’ll receive a free pedometer,” said Melanie Chapman, YMCA fitness director.

  • To call this a Holocaust film is like calling Stanley Kubrick’s “The Shining” a love triangle. You have some explaining to do.

    Stefan Ruzowitsky’s “Flsher, Die,” or “The Counterfeiters” – 2008’s Oscar-winner for Best Foreign Language Film – takes place in a German concentration camp near the end of World War II. But like all memorable films, its setting serves more as a stage or catalyst than as the answer to the question, “What is this movie about?”

  • Why is a new Bond needed and what will it be used for?

    Over the years, the Los Alamos Public Schools have enjoyed a reputation for academic achievement and recognition by numerous groups and publications for excellence. While the district actively strives to provide an atmosphere where students can succeed, its buildings continue to age and deteriorate. Research documents that in well-built, attractive environments, student behavior is more positive and achievement is higher.

  • For this upcoming fundraiser, no formal attire or physical training is required; in fact, all that is needed to participate in the United Way of Northern New Mexico’s People Matter Bowling Event is some bowling shoes and a $30 donation.

    With these few requirements, participants can bowl from 6-9 p.m. Sept. 27 in the Big Rock Bowling Center in Espaola.

    In addition to helping out United Way in the current campaign to raise funds for its 18 agencies, people will also be awarded door prizes, giveaways and prizes for the highest and lowest scores.

  • Editor’s Note: This is a personal account of the Star Gazing on the Preserve event.

    At first the sky over the caldera was empty, except for a good-size wedge of the moon, which illuminated a pearl-gray light. But as the sky darken, it seemed as though a curtain was pulled back to the infinite amount of wonders the heavens contain.

    For those of us participating in the Star Gazing on the Preserve event, a handful of these features were seen in a closer view.

  • Missionary John Wakabi of Uganda has worked in the U.S. since 2001 after receiving a call from a higher power.

    “God sent me here,” he said, “to bring the message of repentance and healing.”

    He has spread this message all over the country, traveling to Texas, Colorado, North Carolina and Washington, D.C. He also spent time in Espaola in June where more than 1,000 people attended his service.

  • It was the final show of the season, but it felt like the closure of something else, too.

    The singer’s raspy, bluesy voice weaved through the night air while the crowd mingled in luau shirts and flower leis.

    There were food vendors and an artist painted animals’ faces on children. Young people ran around as cats and butterflies.

    Julie Stewart and the Motor Kings completed the Los Alamos Summer Concert Series – which began in May – but during the concert it was felt as though the band and the crowd were bidding farewell to the summer season.

  • When we see trash on a trail, whether we ignore this detritus of human existence or we pick it up, our perception of an otherwise pristine wilderness is altered.

    Yet if the crushed V8 can and the bottle cap are arranged on an old wooden plank, we are presented with an alternate reality.

    The current exhibit at the Art Center at Fuller Lodge, “Everything Old is New Again: Recycled and Experimental” provides a unique opportunity for contemplating this dynamic.

  • Officials of National Merit Scholarship Corporation (NMSC) announced the names of approximately 16,000 semifinalists in the 54th annual National Merit Scholarship Program.

    The 10 Los Alamos semifinalists in the 2009 National Merit Scholarship Program are: Adam Nekimken, Daniel Trugman, Lindsey Jacobs, Adam Izraelevitz, Adam Trujillo, Daniel Cox, Jonathan Robey, Bethany Sullivan, Lisa-Anne Hendricks and Daniel Dyer.