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Features

  • Sunday celebrates Beltane, or May Day, the third and last of the ancient Pagan fertility festivals. The first, Imbolc, is the first stirrings of the new season. The second, Ostara, celebrated at the spring equinox, recognizes spring has arrived. In many northern climates it is still too early to plant. Beltane would be the time when northern communities would be getting ready for their planting season.

  • Janet Bosarge of Los Alamos may not paint or photograph, but she does know the art of marketing. To help promote several local artists’ works and the work of visiting artists, Bosarge is hosting a fine arts party from 10 a.m.-7 p.m. Saturday at her home, located at 2326 Canyon Glen.

    Artists whose works will show at the party include sculptor John Fleming of Kirkland, Wash., photographer Harry Clifford of Los Alamos, painter Stede Barber of Los Alamos, painter Beth Ferguson of Abquu and Barb Ruble of Washington.

  • Los Alamos Little Theatre presents its final play this season, “The Importance of Being Earnest,” by Oscar Wilde. On its surface, the play is about two young men and their courtship with their respective girlfriends in the time of Queen Victoria.

  • Join Juanita “Winnie” Madland for another pedagogical pianist concert-lecture, at 12:30 p.m. Wednesday at Fuller Lodge. The concert is a part of the free Los Alamos Arts Council Brown Bag series.

  • Every year, there’s a day where I glance around and suddenly realize how green and full the streetscapes look, trees flush with new leaves, colors so bright they belong in a detergent commercial.

  • In “Dear Frankie,” Director Shona Auerbach manages to find lots of heartfelt drama in a scenario that could have easily been written off as comedy. If you’re willing to suspend your disbelief just a little, you might even cry at the next presentation of Mesa Public Library’s Free Film Series, scheduled for 6:30 p.m. Thursday in the upstairs meeting room theater.

  • Noah Sandoval, the son of Peter and Cindy Sandoval, has been chosen as the Rotary Student of the Month for April. Sandoval is involved in many school and community organizations. At the high school, Sandoval is the senior class president of student council, which he has been involved in for three years. Similarly, he serves as the National Honor Societys vice president, and has been a member for the past two years.

  • Look up in the sky! Its a bird! Its a plane! No, its one of more than 20 rockets launched by members of the Pion Rocket Club during an early morning assembly at the school. Students at the school participated in the countdown for each launch, which featured rockets with names such as Big Bertha, Big Daddy and Screaming Eagle.

    There was also a three-stage rocket, a rocket that measured more than 5 feet and one less than 5 inches tall.

  • The Kiwanis Club of Los Alamos is offering the chance to sleep late, forget about washing dishes and still get breakfast for your entire family.

    The Kiwanis Club will hold a pancake breakfast from 7 - 11 a.m. Saturday at the Betty Ehart Senior Center.

  • Kokopelli, a fertility and agriculture deity who chases away winter and ushers in spring with his flute playing, traveled to Barranca Mesa Elementary School this week.

    The fourth-grade class worked since January to prepare for his arrival. In fact, the whole staff, from physical education instructors to social studies teachers, got in on the action. They helped students not only study this Southwestern Native American god, but write and illustrate books about the deity, create puppets for a puppet show, rehearse a song about Kokopelli, and learn a Kokopelli dance.

  • Los Alamos High School Olions Thespian Club is not ending its theater season on a sweet note. No, a much more evil, sinister song will be sung. Something villainous appears to be growing within Duane Smith Auditorium. It’s in the form of a monstrous, man-eating Venus-fly-trap in the musical, “Little Shop of Horrors.”

    “This is a show I always I wanted to do,” Nina Saunders, sponsor of the Olions, said. “From the first time I saw ee I was just intrigued about the idea of a musical being a horror story.”

  • Twenty years ago, there was no year-round community pool in Los Alamos. The community shared a small pool with Los Alamos High School, but the public’s use was restricted because of the high school swimmers’ busy schedules.

    A group of citizens decided to change the situation. So, in 1984, a group of Los Alamos residents talked to the county recreation board about building a community pool, said Frederica Smith, aquatic center sub-committee and parks and recreation board member.

  • The Unitarian Church of Los Alamos will formally install its seventh minister, the Rev. John A. Cullinan, in a ceremony at 4:30 p.m. Saturday at the church.

    The installation ceremony is a formal recognition of the covenant between the minister and the congregation. The Rev. Jennifer Innis has been invited to preach the sermon, titled “Sunday Promises.” She serves as minister of the Unitarian Universalist Church of Midland, Texas and the consulting minister for the Red River Unitarian Universalist Church in Denison, Texas.

  • Local Orthodox Christians are joining all Orthodox Christians across the world in the celebration of Holy Week and Pascha (Easter). This preparation began last weekend with the end of Great Lent Saturday, and the Saturday of the Raising of Lazarus from the grave. For Orthodox Christians, this year Pascha (as Easter is called) falls several weeks later then the Western Protestant and Roman Catholic observance.

  • The 41st Annual Spring Arts and Crafts Fair will be a homecoming for John Trujillo. The jewelry-maker grew up in Los Alamos and graduated from Los Alamos High Sschool in 1966. The community holds another significance other than childhood memories. It inspired him to do jewelry.

    Trujillo said his high school art teacher taught him to make jewelry, although it didn’t impact him until later.

  • Mozart started composing music when he was 5 years old. At 7, Thomas Chadwick of Los Alamos isn’t too far behind the famous composer.

    Chadwick is one of 16 finalists in the Hey Mozart!, a statewide program that encourages children who are 12 and younger to create an original melody. The program is now in its third year.

  • Peter Bretter, played by Jason Segel, is a successful composer on a hip TV crime show, and is dating one of the shows hottest lead actresses, Sarah Marshal (Kristen Bell). Or at least that’s how things have been going up for the last five years.

  • “Soft fried chicken cubes.” “Fungus with onions.” “Fried fish in squirrel shape.”

    Even when translated into English, the menus don’t read like a list of entrees so much as a table of contents in a book of poetry: “Fried celery with salty pork.” “Mixed green stuff.” “Local snack.”

  • The American Indian Science and Engineering Societys (AISES) science fair was held in Albuquerque March 27-29 at the convention center. Participating were two sixth-graders from Mountain Elementary School, Morgan Irish and Chance Butler.

    They not only participated, but Irish and Butler earned high marks on their projects; they placed high in their division and both won medals.

    Students of Native American heritage are eligible to enter into this national competition and to do so must meet exacting standards of scientific rigor prior to the event.

  • Spring break, for me, means the ballet studios are closed and I have to find some other way to contort myself. Thanks to the suggestion of a friend, I found one in Los Alamos’ newest, hottest thing: Bikram yoga.

    Day One

    I went in kind of cocky. I can touch my toes easily. I can do the splits. But Bikram’s Yoga College of India – Los Alamos, the new studio located in the old Ed’s Market, offers something I’d never done: yoga in a humid, 105-degree setting.

    The temperature makes the news more often than owner Melissa Theesfeld wishes.