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Features

  • By Melissa Riedel-Espinoza

    Special to the Monitor

  • Members of the New Mexico Potters and Clay Artists (NMPCA), with the support of Fuller Lodge Art Center, will stage an exhibition of work titled “Conversations in Clay.”  
    The exhibit runs from Aug. 14-Sept. 19 at the Fuller Lodge Art Center, with an opening reception on opening day from 5-7 p.m.
    The theme encouraged members to participate in different ways, including working with another artist, to create visual conversations.  Individual entries by a single artist are also included, along with a one-sentence “conversation starter” description.  
    Members have been talking about this show for months. Those who collaborated with another found that the effort of working together resulted in a whole greater than the simple sum of its parts. The synergy created by this approach will continue to rebound in the clay community and in the work of individual artists throughout New Mexico.  

  • The documentary film, “SlingShot,” is scheduled to premiere at 7:30 p.m. Friday in Santa Fe. The film will be shown a the Center for Contemporary Arts (CCA).
    “SlingShot” features Dean Kamen, quirky iconclast and inventor, who has been called the “Thomas Edison of our time.” This film follows Kamen, who created several innovative products and medical devices that help people in need and ease suffering, in his newest endeavor to solve the world’s clean water crisis with a purification device called SlingShot. (slingshotdoc.com)
    The film, directed by Paul Lazarus, is winner of multiple awards, including New Hampshire Film Festival: Best Feature Documentary, Boston Film Festival: EcoFilm Award and Best Director, and Florida Film Festival: Grand Jury Prize and Audience Favorite Award.
    Kamen is also founder of FIRST (For Inspiration and Recognition of Science Technology), a nonprofit that hosts youth programs and problem-solving competitions to inspire students to create opportunities and solutions to complex problems through science, engineering and technology.
    The film will be run through Aug. 13 at the CCA.
    General admission is $10 (seniors: $8.50, and $8, for student members, and $7 for children. Information and online ticket purchase, ccasantafe.org.

  • Los Alamos Little Theatre announces the line-up of short plays scheduled for performance in November.
    “We are very pleased that this season’s 8x10 production features exclusively playwrights connected to the region,” said co-producer Kelli Guider. “This production is a great opportunity for first-time directors and actors, or anyone who wants to explore his or her creative side.”
    Auditions for the 8x10s will be from 2-5 p.m. Saturday and Sunday at the Performing Arts Center, also known as the Los Alamos Little Theatre, 1670 Nectar St. Persons who would like to audition but are not able to make those times are encouraged to contact co-producer John Gustafson at johngus@cybermesa.com to make alternate arrangements.
    Copies of the scripts are available at the Mesa Public Library and the White Rock branch for perusal and overnight checkout.
    LALT’s 2015-16 season opens in September with the classic play “Harvey” by Mary Chase, directed by Gwen Lewis.
    LALT is a nonprofit 501(c)3 organization that has been providing theatre to the Los Alamos community for more than 70 years.

  • The changing exhibit room at the Los Alamos Historical Museum will be housing the “Kids Make History” exhibit until Sept. 4. The museum welcomes the public to enjoy local kids’ artwork that is on display. The exhibit also includes a number of fun art projects for children, adults and families to participate in.
    The art featured in the “Kids Make History” exhibit includes work by students in kindergarten and in the second, third and fourth grades at Aspen, Barranca Mesa, Mountain and Piñon Elementary schools, as well as work from homeschooled children. Students took inspiration for their art from lessons they were taught about homesteading, archaeology and Ancestral Puebloans and their traditions.
    The “Kids Make History” exhibit also includes participatory projects for the Los Alamos Historical Museum’s visitors to take part in. There are tables that can seat adults and children that have projects and coloring pages for everyone to use. There are also blank spaces on the wall for the art done by visitors to be added to the exhibit.
    For more information, visit the Los Alamos Historical museum’s website at losalamoshistory.org/museum.

  • There’s an awful lot of talk this week about the whole back to school thing, but I know a handful of youth that grasping at every minute of summer.
    The annual Fair and Rodeo, is for some of the Los Alamos Commerce and Development Corporation’s Youth Business Grant recipients biggest selling opportunity yet.
    Morgan Smith will be on hand with origami creations called, Grandma’s Butterflies, “The Butterflies of Love.”
    Smith handcrafts the origami beauties, which will be on display and available by special order for just $1 each, bringing happiness to the receiver.
    She makes the butterflies today, in honor of her grandma, who passed away in February. Since the butterflies made her grandma happy, she hopes they will bring the same joy to others.
    If you don’t make it to the concert on Friday, one delicious vendor in town has them available anytime. The Rose Chocolatier is a proud supporter of two YBG recipients displaying Smith’s butterflies and 2014 recipient Ruby Selvage’s chocolate rocks for sale.
    If you feel the need for a really stellar fudgsicle, consider heading to one local business that is supporting our youth and youth serving programs.

  • Recurring meetings
    Note: If any of the following listings need to be changed or removed, contact Gina Velasquez immediately at lacommunity@lamonitor.com, or 662-4185, ext. 21.

    The Atomic City Corvette Club meets at 6 p.m. on the first Thursday of each month at Time Out Pizza in White Rock. For more information, contact Chris Ortega at 672-9789.

    The Los Alamos Table Tennis Club meets from 7:30-10 p.m. Tuesdays; and from 9:30 a.m.-1:30 p.m. Saturdays, at the Betty Ehart Senior Center, lower level. On Tuesday, there is a fee of $2 per player. There is no charge on Saturday. For more information, contact Avadh Saxena at AVADH—S@hotmail.com or Ed Stein at 662-7472.

    The Lions Club meets at 84 Barcelona in White Rock on the first and third Thursdays. For more information, call 672-3300 or 672-9563.

    The Rotary Club of Los Alamos meets at noon every Tuesday at the golf course, 4250 Diamond Dr. Guest speakers every week. See full Be There calendar for details.

    Kiwanis Club of Los Alamos meets Tuesdays from Noon-1 p.m. at Trinity on the Hill Church in Kelly Hall.  

  • The Los Alamos Animal Shelter, 226 East Road, 662-8179, has a great selection of adoptable pets just waiting for their forever home, so come adopt a new best friend today! Be sure to check out the Petfinder website for pictures of all adorable adoptable animals:

    petfinder.com/shelters/friendsoftheshelter.html

    SHELTER HOURS: Noon to 6 p.m. Monday – Friday, 11 a.m. to 4 p.m., Saturday and noon-3 p.m. Sunday.
    Also, be sure to check out the website at lafos.org, to get more information about volunteering, adopting and donating, as well as read up on some of your favorite animals and learn more about special needs animals or cats and dogs currently in foster care.

    All adoptable pets are microchipped, spayed or neutered, and up-to-date on vaccinations.
    CATS
    Annie — A 9-year-old, spayed, female who just loves being petted! She has a very pretty black/gray, orange and white coat with short hair. Due to medical care needed by her owner, Annie is now at the shelter looking for her forever home. She can sometimes be a bit shy with shelter visitors, but she quickly warms up to you when you offer her some belly rubs!

  • The Summit Garden Club will have its monthly meeting on Monday. The program will include a tour of gardens by three club members. The meeting begins at 1:30 p.m. at the home of Bev Cooper, 521 Ridgecrest Dr. in White Rock.  
    After touring the Cooper garden, the group will move on to the gardens of two additional members.  
    Non-members are invited to join the club for the tour and if desiring more information on the Summit Garden Club, all are invited to stay for the business meeting and refreshments.  
    For more information, call Doris Thielemann at 672-9291.  
    The Summit Garden Club is a member of the New Mexico and National Garden Clubs.
    The mission of NGC is to provided education, resources, and national networking opportunities for its members, to promote the love of gardening, floral design and civic and environmental responsibility.
    In addition to education on gardening, the Summit Club is currently maintaining two gardens at Bandelier National Monument and the White Rock Community Garden.

  • Los Alamos County Library System wrapped up the 2015 Summer Library Club during the grand opening of the new White Rock Branch Library Friday.
    Youth Services has put together an entire week of special programming for White Rock. “We didn’t get to have as many programs for White Rock as we usually do in the summer, so we wanted to make up for it and celebrate the new space in a fun way for everyone,” Angie Manfredi, head of Youth Services said.
    Youth Services has planned a week full of programs for all ages of kids at the new library.
    Community members from White Rock and Los Alamos are invited to participate.  
    Monday
    1-2 p.m. — Lego Club, Jr. (ages 0-6)
    2-3 p.m. — Lego Club (ages 7+)
    Tuesday
    9:30-10 a.m. — Music & Movement (ages 0-6)
    10:10-10:30 a.m. — Baby Time (ages 0-2)
    2-3 p.m. — Monster Party (ages 6 and over, 6 and under must be accompanied by an adult)
    Wednesday
    9:30-10 a.m. — Music & Movement (ages 0-6)
    1-1:45 p.m. — Meet the Music (ages 7-12)
    Thursday
    9:30-10 a.m. — Music & Movement (ages 0-6)
    10:30-11 a.m. — Toddler Time (ages 2-4)
    1-1:45 p.m. — Ready, Set, Read! (ages 4-7)
    Friday

  • Aug. 2-8, 2015
    For information, call the Betty Ehart Senior Center (BESC) at 662-8920, the White Rock Senior Center (WRSC) at 662-8200 and “Day Out” (adult day care, 8 a.m.-4 p.m.) at 661-0081. Reservations must be made by 10 a.m. for daily lunches.
    Betty Ehart
    MONDAY
    8:45 a.m.        Cardio
    10 a.m.        Senior Civic Discussion group
    11:30 a.m.        Lunch: Baked chicken
    2 p.m.        Pinochle
    6 p.m.        Argentine Tango dancing
    7 p.m.        Ballroom dancing
    TUESDAY
    8:45 a.m.        Variety training
    10 a.m.        Computer users group
    11:30 a.m.        Lunch: Breaded pollock
    1:30 p.m.        Party bridge
    7 p.m.        Bridge
    7:30 p.m.        Table tennis
    WEDNESDAY
    8:30 a.m.        LAVA quilters
    8:45 a.m.        Cardio Plus Exercise

  • The Los Alamos Little Theatre are looking for volunteers Sunday to help with the construction of the set for "Harvey." Volunteers are needed 10 a.m.-2 p.m. Anyone interested can email Paul Lewis at plewis0@comcast.net. Part time and walk in help are also welcome. Pizza for lunch provided.

  • Art exhibits
    Ann Hosfeld and Reg Loving: Nature Diversified. Through Aug. 3 at New Concept Gallery in Santa Fe.

    The 11th Annual Gala Exhibition and Auction on display through Aug. 28 will showcase artists from across the U.S. and abroad who find inspiration in Fechin’s legacy, Taos and the creative traditions of the Southwest.

    Photographs Keith Carter “Ghostland” and Kate Breakey “Shadow and Light,” at the photo-eye Gallery, 541 S. Guadalupe St. in Santa Fe. Show runs through Aug. 22.

    Zane Bennett Gallery announces “IMPACTS! II” an exhibition featuring Bi Rongrong, Shen Fan, Liang Shaoji and others, with seven artists in total. The show opens from 5-7 p.m.  Friday at the gallery, 435 South Guadalupe St., across from the rail station in Santa Fe, and coincides with the Last Friday Art Walk in the Railyard Arts District. The grand opening will be from 5-7 p.m. Aug. 21. There will be exciting events occurring during these openings involving traditional and contemporary Chinese culture, with more information to follow.

    “Where the Buffalo Roam.” Angel Wynn, American artist and photographer. 4-6 p.m. Friday through Aug. 31 at Angel Wynn Gallery in Santa Fe.

  • The Santa Fe Summer Series Horse Show is an experience of horses, hospitality and fun that is going on now through Aug. 9, and provides beauty and excitement for the whole family. The show is free and open to the public.
    Hundreds of top equestrian athletes will perform under vast New Mexico skies and showcase the finest in show jumping. Spectators will also enjoy the Blue Corn Brewery Beer Garden, polo competitions on grassy fields, and an array of local food and musical talent.
    Bring a blanket or purchase VIP Lounge Tickets at hipicosantafe.com.
    The atmosphere will be electric during fast-paced, exciting jumping competitions. Horse and rider performances range from the elegant hunter style to edge-of-your-seat, show jumping thrill.
    The lineup for Saturday includes the Sandia Mini-Cooper Ride-and-Drive contest featuring New Mexico Indy champions Al and Robby Unser.
    The Grand Prix de Santa Fe competition on Aug. 9 features international riders, champagne brunch and benefits local charities for youth and equines.
    The Santa Fe Summer Series is at a new venue, HIPICO Santa Fe, a world-class equestrian venue on 137 dreamy acres in the beautiful Land of Enchantment conveniently located near the Santa Fe Municipal Airport.

  • In almost three decades at the National Museum of Women in the Arts, first as curator and now as Director Susan Fisher Sterling has shaped exhibitions and the museum while making bold statements on the importance of women artists. In turn, women artists have made bold statements on the need for social change. These will be among the themes addressed by Sterling and others on Aug. 6, at the Women’s International Study Center’s EDGE Series presentation at the Santa Fe Prep Auditorium at 7 p.m.
    The program begins with Dr. Elizabeth A. Sackler, chair of the Board of the Brooklyn Museum, introducing Sterling who will describe the role that the National Museum of Women in the Arts has played for more than 25 years in focusing attention on and heightening awareness of women artists. Sterling will also focus remarks on women artists who draw attention on the need for social change and often become catalysts for that change. The program then expands as Dr. Kymberly Pinder, Dean of the College of Fine Arts at the University of New Mexico, moderates a discussion between Sterling and three distinguished artists, Harmony Hammond, Meridel Rubinstein and Rose B. Simpson. This discussion will highlight how these artists have used their talents to advance social change. Questions from the audience will then be addressed to complete the evening.

  • Antique show comes to Duke City

    The 17th annual Great Southwestern Antique Show is coming to Albuquerque Aug. 7-9 at the Manual Lujan Complex, at Expo New Mexico State Fairgrounds in Albuquerque.
    The show’s proceeds benefit KNME-TV / New Mexico PBS.
    The show features more than 200 of America’s finest dealers of art and antiques, with the proceeds from this event benefiting local nonprofits focused on the enhancement of Arts and Education in New Mexico.
    This show continues to grow every year and is one of the top national antique events of its kind.
    Due to the southwest location, the show has a unique merican flavor leaning heavily on early American Arts & Crafts, Native American, Western Fine Art and Ethnographic Art, but with more than 200 dealers anything and everything can and does show up. It is a designer and decorator’s dream and a shopper’s paradise, both for the novice collector and the well-seasoned veteran.

  • El Rancho de las Golondrinas is where the west is truly wild this summer.
    From 10 a.m.-4 p.m. Aug. 1-2, members of the community can meet lawmen, desperados and mountain men who put the “wild” in “wild west!” Learn about life and how people survived on the dangerous frontier.
    There will be two special performances at 11 a.m. and 3 p.m., of the New Mexico Territory Cowboy Mounted Shooters.
    From 11:45 a.m.-2:45 p.m., both days, instructors will be available to teach archery and atlatl. Reservations are required and sign up for a shoot as soon as possible to get a spot because spaces fill up quickly and are on a first come, first served basis.
    Saturday only, The Honorable Bruce Black will present a lecture on “Elfego Baca: Lawman of New Mexico” in the Paloheimo Education Center.
    From 1-1:45 p.m. Saturday and Sunday in the Golondrinas Chapel, Edward Wallace will speak about “Estevan the Moor,” the 1539 Fray Marcos de Niza expedition.
    In addition, there will be Musical Performers of the Frontier Past, Mark Gardner and Rex Rideout, frontier music by Yesso Stockman, and music from the ranch and open range by Steve Cormier. Plus, roving fiddle music by New Mexico’s own, Michael Jasper.

  • Ever want to learn more about what’s growing at the Los Alamos Nature Center? Becky Oertel, head of the Pajarito Environmental Education Center’s landscape committee and veteran gardener Natali Steinberg will explain. The public is welcome to see what’s growing, why each plant was chosen, and what kind of care they need to thrive. The tour will be 7 p.m. Aug. 4 at the Los Alamos Nature Center, 2600 Canyon Road. It is free to attend, and no registration is required. 

  • With his wealth of compositions, Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart is one of the most favored composers in Western music, and well-liked at The Santa Fe Opera. This year they are presenting an earlier work of Mozart’s, “La Finta Giardiniera.” This opera, with its unrealistic plot, is enjoyable, no matter how nonsensical the action on the stage seems. Mozart’s music is so agreeable that it renders weaknesses in the storyline irrelevant.
    The orchestra is, as usual, fantastic, as is the conductor, Harry Bicket. Bicket is also very pleasing to watch. It sounds as though this bouncy, energetic score derives some panache from the man with the baton.
    The set is exactly what one would expect for a Mozart piece — however, this doesn’t mean it’s boring. Audience members can settle in their seats and view the extraordinary Santa Fe sunset happening in the background, making each performance unique. The costumes, as well, are fairly typical, but again, not in the least boring. The Podestà looks magnificent, as does his niece, Arminda.
    Even the plain black clothing in which the servants are dressed is beautifully tailored, and the colors and fabrics provide a wonderful visual balance with the stage.