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Features

  • Dec. 10 — A boy. Kai Robert Larsen. Born to Karla Sartor and Brian Larsen.
    Dec. 22 — A boy. Zoddyn Sisson. Born to Thane Sisson.
    Dec. 25 — A boy. Aarik Rey Griego. Born to Stephanie and Daniel Griego.
    Dec. 27 — A boy. Andrew Yian Dai. Born to Yamin Hou and Yaomin Dai.
    Dec. 31 — A girl. Aria Jayme Garcia. Born to Amanda and Ruben Garcia.
    Dec. 31 — A boy. Ashton Chanin Lovato. Born to RatchaniDa “Nam” and Joseph Lovato.

  • The Natural Resources Conservation Service, in cooperation with the New Mexico Natural Resources Department, Forestry Division, is offering applications for low-cost tree seedlings sales.
    To be eligible, applicants must own at least an acre of land, and plant the seedlings for either windbreaks, reforestation, Christmas trees, erosion control, conservation education or wildlife plantings.
    There are many species available that are adapted to the area, in deciduous and conifers. For more information or to get on the mailing list, call 471-0410, ext. 3, between Jan. 1 and Jan. 31.

  • The Los Alamos County Parks, Recreation, and Open Spaces Division is taking over the Los Alamos Nature Center from 6-7:30 p.m. Jan. 17 and putting up a putt-putt course.
    Play through the nature center and win prizes, including free passes to the pool or ice rink and more.
    It is a great way to learn about the latest news about the trails and enjoy a fun, free evening. This family-friendly event is open to all ages.
    The putt-putt evening will take place at the Los Alamos Nature Center at 2600 Canyon Road. The event is free and no registration is required.
    For more information about this and other Pajarito Environmental Education Center programs, visit peecnature.org, email programs@peecnature.org or call 662-0460.

  • Dr. Siegfried S. Hecker, of Stanford University and Director Emeritus of Los Alamos National Laboratory, will be the next speaker in the Los Alamos Historical Society’s 2016-2017 lecture series.
    Hecker will speak at 7 p.m. Tuesday at Fuller Lodge. His presentation will be “Are we still ‘Doomed to Cooperate?’”
    The lecture series theme is “Multiple Perspectives of the Atomic Bomb.”
    Hecker’s book, “Doomed to Cooperate” was published in 2016 by Bathtub Row Press. It tells the story of nuclear scientists from Russia and the U.S. who reached across political, geographic and cultural divides to confront the new nuclear threats that resulted from the collapse of the Soviet Union.
    Hecker will tell the story of how the book was completed during a time when relations between Moscow and Washington collapsed. He will also look at future prospects for the U.S.-Russian nuclear cooperation in the new political environment.

  • TODAY
     Feature Film: “We are Astronomers” at 2 p.m. at the Nature Center. Cost is $6 for adults, $4 for children.
    MONDAY
    Nature Playtimes at 10 a.m. at the Nature Center. Join local families for fun in nature. Free.

    Chapter AK, P.E.O., meeting Monday at 7:30 p.m. at the home of Jane Phillips, 110 Grand Canyon in White Rock. Pamela Massey is the co-hostess. Katie Brousseau will provide the program. RSVP to Jane at 672-1677.
    TUESDAY
    Family Night Sponsored by Kiwanis Club from 6-7 p.m. at the Nature Center. Come to the nature center for a night of fun activities.Free.

    Kiwanis meeting from noon-1 p.m. in Kelly Hall at Trinity-on-the-Hill Episcopal Church, 3900 Trinity Drive. Los Alamos County Public Works Director Philo Shelton will speak on the upcoming election on the proposed county Recreation Bond Issue.

    Rotary Club of Los Alamos meeting from noon-1 p.m. at the Los Alamos Golf Course. Siobhan Niklasson of the Pajarito Environmental Education Center will speak on outdoor play.

  • The Los Alamos Animal Shelter, 226 East Road, 662-8179, has a great selection of adoptable pets just waiting for their forever home, so come adopt your new best friend today! All adoptable pets are microchipped, spayed or neutered, and up-to-date on vaccinations. Shelter hours are noon – 6 p.m. Monday through Friday, 11 a.m.–4 p.m. Saturday, and noon–3 p.m. Sunday.
    Be sure to check out the website at lafos.org, to get more information about volunteering, adopting and donating. Also check out Petfinder website for pictures of adoptable animals: petfinder.com/shelters/friendsoftheshelter.html.
    CATS
    Lemon—A sweet older cat that was left at the front door of the shelter with no information or history. Lemon is currently in foster care receiving treatment for diabetes; her foster home reports that they call her Sugar. When Lemon is feeling better, she’ll be looking for a mellow home.
    Bingley—A soft and sweet gray and tan kitty that just wants a person to snuggle with! She has the sweetest meow that she uses to get your attention when she wants some snuggles. When she’s not snuggling, she can be found curled up in a cat bed. This older, petite girl would probably do better with older children.

  • Mesa Public Library will show the film “Grizzly Man” at 6:30 p.m. Thursday in the upstairs meeting room.
    This is the first in a year-long series of free films that will be shown on the first Thursday of each month.
    The films for January, February and March have been chosen to reflect “The Best of the 2000s.”
    Communing with nature takes on a whole new meaning in the hands of expert filmmaker Werner Herzog, who has nearly 70 films to his credit.
    The film tells the story of bear lover and amateur naturalist Timothy Treadwell, who spent 13 summers living among grizzly bears in the Katmai National Park and Preserve.
    Herzog has taken much of the footage shot by Treadwell himself and blended it with interviews with Treadwell’s friends to create a complete, if enigmatic picture of a man who felt a special kinship with grizzly bears. Herzog wrote and narrated the film.
    Glorious nature photography from Katmai National Park and Preserve is interwoven with Treadwell’s views as one of the founders of the Grizzly People –  a group which disagrees with many Park Service regulations designed to protect wildlife. His ranting against the people who he felt would harm the bears is laced with profanity.

  • TUESDAY
    Kiwanis meeting from noon-1 p.m. in Kelly Hall at Trinity-on-the-Hill Episcopal Church, 3900 Trinity Drive. The speaker has not yet been scheduled.
    WEDNESDAY
    The Jemez Thrift Shop is having a Bag Day today from 10 a.m.-4 p.m. Everyone can fill a large brown paper bag with anything they wish for $5.
    THURSDAY
    Nature on Tap: Our Local Trails from 5:30-7 p.m. at the Nature Center. Discuss the future of the Los Alamos trail network, including the proposed flow trail. Free.
    FRIDAY
    January Night Sky Show at 7 p.m. at the Nature Center. Discover and identify objects visible in our night sky this month, and enjoy their beauty from our planetarium. Cost is $6 for adults, $4 for children.

    The Jemez Thrift Shop is having a Bag Day today from 10 a.m.-4 p.m. Everyone can fill a large brown paper bag with anything they wish for $5.
    JAN. 7
    Snowshoe Hike in the Valles Caldera from 10:30 a.m.-1 p.m. Join a ranger and PEEC on a 2 - 2.5 hour, easy-to-moderate snowshoe hike in the Valles Caldera National Preserve. Admission: Preserve entrance fee.

  • Jan. 2-7
    For information, call the Betty Ehart Senior Center (BESC) at 662-8920, the White Rock Senior Center (WRSC) at 672-2034 and “Day Out” (adult day care, 8 a.m.-4 p.m.) at 661-0081. Reservations: by 10 a.m. for lunches.

    Betty Ehart

    MONDAY
    BESC Closed New Year’s Holiday

    TUESDAY
    8:45 a.m.        Variety Training
    11:30 a.m.        Lunch: Chicken Fried
            Chicken
    1 p.m.        Party Bridge
    7 p.m.        Bridge
    7:30 p.m.        Table Tennis

    WEDNESDAY    
    8:30 a.m.        LAVA Quilters
    8:45 a.m.        Cardio Plus
    10:30 a.m.        Music w/Ruth
    11:30 a.m.        Lunch: Frito Pie
    1:30 p.m.        Duplicate Bridge

    THURSDAY        
    8:30 a.m.        Ad Hoc Hikers
    8:45 a.m.        Variety Training

  • Enrolled veterans of the New Mexico VA Health Care System (NMVAHCS) who have legal questions on civil matters will have an opportunity to receive free consultation with licensed New Mexico attorneys and other legal professionals on Jan. 10, at the New Mexico Veterans Memorial, 1100 Louisiana Blvd. SE (just off Gibson) in Albuquerque.
    The Civil Legal Clinic will be open from 8:30-11 a.m.
    The clinic offers brief legal advice about topics such as consumer rights, bankruptcy, landlord-tenant issues, foreclosure and employment.
    Veterans may also bring their questions regarding family law, including divorce, child support, custody and visitation. The clinic does not handle wills or estate planning.
    No appointment is necessary, and veterans are encouraged to bring with them any documents relating to their legal issues. The clinic is the result of a collaborative effort by the NMVAHCS and the State Bar of New Mexico Young Lawyers Division, as well as other legal service providers and community providers from around the state.
    More free civil legal clinics for veterans are scheduled in 2017 for the same time and location on March 14, June 13 and Sept. 12. For more information, please contact Lisa Anderson at (505) 265-1711, ext. 3434.

  • The Los Alamos Police Department held its third-annual awards banquet Dec. 10, handing out more than 70 awards.
    Included in these awards were three lifesaving and six “of the year” awards.
    “It is always a privilege to recognize employees of the police department for all their hard work and achievements,” said LAPD Commander Preston Ballew.
    The following were the highest awards presented for the night:
    • Dispatcher Roberto Lujan:  two life saving commendations
    • Dispatcher Angela Cordova:  life saving commendation
    • Civilian of the Year: Evidence Technician Anthony Lucero
    • Dispatcher of the Year: Dispatcher Roberto Lujan
    • Detention Officer of the Year: Officer Kathryn Philips
    • Police Officer of the Year: Corporal Adele Girmendonk
    • Supervisor of the Year: Detective Sergeant James Rodriguez
    • Supervisor of the Year: Jail Administrator Hilario “Eli” Salinas

  • Critical care nurse and bear attack victim Karen Williams will speak at the next Lunch with a Leader, a community event presented by the League of Women Voters.
    The lunch will be at 11:45 a.m. Jan. 17 at Mesa Public Library.
    Although Williams works as a nurse at the Los Alamos Medical Center, she is best known for her tragic encounter with a bear who thought her cubs were being threatened while she was running a trail marathon in the Valle Caldera last June.
    Williams is an Air Force brat, so she has lived in many places since they moved every two years. Her father retired in Albuquerque and she ended up in New Mexico.
    Williams became a nurse in 1982 and worked at UNMH for a year in the Burn and Trauma Unit. She entered the Army in 1983 as a military intelligence analyst and specialized in Central and South America. Around this time, Williams also started running in triathlons and completed her first marathon in San Francisco in 1986. In 1988, she left the Army and went back to nursing at UNMH until 2006.
    Following that she moved to Candy Kitchen, New Mexico and lived off-grid for six years. She met her husband, Mike, on Match.com and moved to Los Alamos in 2012 to be with him.

  • The Los Alamos Animal Shelter, 226 East Road, 662-8179, has a great selection of adoptable pets just waiting for their forever home, so come adopt your new best friend today! All adoptable pets are microchipped, spayed or neutered, and up-to-date on vaccinations. Shelter hours are noon – 6 p.m. Monday through Friday, 11 a.m.–4 p.m. Saturday, and noon–3 p.m. Sunday.
    Be sure to check out the website at lafos.org, to get more information about volunteering, adopting and donating. Also check out Petfinder website for pictures of adoptable animals: petfinder.com/shelters/friendsoftheshelter.html.
    CATS
    Lemon—A sweet older cat that was left at the front door of the shelter with no information or history. Lemon is currently in foster care receiving treatment for diabetes; her foster home reports that they call her Sugar, since she’s so sweet! When Lemon is feeling better, she’ll be looking for a mellow home that is understanding of the needs of a diabetic cat.

  • Giving an adorable puppy or kitten as a gift this holiday season may seem like a wonderful idea, but it is important to remember that pets need a lifetime of care and commitment long after the holiday season. Surprising your family with a new fuzzy friend on that special holiday morning is tempting, but be sure to first consider these facts to avoid being unprepared when bringing a pet home.
    Giving the gift of companionship requires a considerable amount of research and preparation. There can be many reasons why a pet may be unsuitable for a home, such as if the receiver is not financially or mentally prepared for a pet. Dr. Stacy Eckman, clinical assistant professor at the Texas A&M College of Veterinary Medicine & Biomedical Sciences, explained how pets can often come with hidden expenses. “Pets, even healthy ones, require a financial commitment for basic requirements, such as food, collars, and leashes, as well as medical needs, such as basic vaccinations,” she said. “Unexpected illnesses or injury may also add to that financial burden, which can be too much for some owners to handle.”

  • Christmas came early for Los Alamos Family Council. Their gift this year is in finding a youth loving new employee in Jordan Redmond, to run the Youth Activity Centers in Los Alamos and White Rock.
    During the LA Public Schools winter break, the Los Alamos location will be moving to a temporary location when schools resume in January. Until that time a full slate of activities are available at the White Rock location in their equally beautiful new facility.
    “The remodel is very exciting as it will enable us to better serve the youth who participate in the program,” Redmond said. “While also providing a more welcoming and warm environment.”
    Redmond is the proud father of two children, a son, Severus, nearly two-and-a-half who already delights in sharing with others. His daughter, Edelweiss, was born this past September. Redmond says he and wife are blessed as the newest arrival already sleeps through the night and shows a keen interest in Darth Vader, a true mark of genius.
    The Youth Activity Centers are firmly rooted in the Search Institute’s 40 Developmental Assets and understands that the relationship built between youth and community adults, equals success for the students.

  • Bandelier Offers Walks on Winter Solstice

    For Ancestral Pueblo farmers, keeping track of the changing of the seasons was crucial for knowing when to plant and harvest. This year, Bandelier National Monument will offer ranger-guided walks to observe possible solstice markers among the Ancestral Pueblo dwellings in Frijoles Canyon. 
    On Wednesday, winter solstice, the Sunrise Walk will meet at 7:15 a.m. in front of the Visitor Center, and the Sunset Walk at 1:30 p.m.
    These times may sound strange, but the 400-foot canyon walls make a big difference in the first and last times of the day that the sun appears as seen from the canyon bottom. The walks will be postponed to the following day if the sky is overcast.
    The shuttles have finished for this year, so participants can drive down to the Visitor Center area, and no signups are required. Participants are encouraged to dress warmly in layers.  Both walks are about 400 yards each way on a level paved trail. The area along the trail, like most of Bandelier National Monument, is habitat for many kinds of native wildlife, so dogs and other pets are not permitted.

  • TODAY
    Astronomy Show: Exoplanet Update for 7 p.m. at the Nature Center.
    How many exoplanets have we found this year? Which ones do we think are similar to Earth? Cost is $6 for adults, $4 for children. More information at peecnature.org.
    SATURDAY
    Christmas Bird Count at 6:30 a.m. at the Nature Center. Participate in the longest running citizen science project in the world, the National Audubon Society’s 117th Annual Christmas Bird Count. Free. More information at peecnature.org.

    Feature Film: “We are Stars” at 2 p.m. at the Nature Center. This exciting, family-friendly film connects us to the evolution of the Universe and explores the secrets of our cosmic chemistry. Cost is $6 for adults, $4 for children. More information at peecnature.org.

    First United Methodist Church will host a dinner to recognize firefighters and police of Los Alamos County at 5:30 p.m. at the church, 715 Diamond Drive. For questions, call 662-6277.

    The Pajarito Lodge 66, Ancient Free & Accepted Masons of New Mexico invite the community to attend an installation ceremony at 4:30 p.m. at the lodge, 1400 North Sage Loop. Refreshments will be served. Anyone interested about Freemasonry or what happens in a lodge is encouraged to attend the event.
    SUNDAY

  • Why do artists love light from the Northern sky?
    “Northern lighting is ideal,” said Karen Wray, owner of Karen Wray Gallery. “It’s a cool blue light and it doesn’t change like the southern sky.”
    This week, the Karen Wray Gallery moves to a new location at 1247 Central Ave., Suite D-2, right next to Boomerang and Warm Hearts Yarn.
    For the past six months Wray has prepared for the move by doing everything she can to make sure the light in her gallery showcases the art in the best conditions.
    “North light is what artists love,” she said. “Halogen light also brings out the best colors in oil paints.”
    To let natural light flood into her gallery’s 2,000 foot space, Wray installed four floor-to-ceiling windows. She also put in a track lighting system of halogen lights, and removed several walls so art lovers have enough room to stand the optimum distance from the paintings.
    The investment in time and money was worth it, because Wray has a passion for local art.
    Her gallery has moved locations four times, but one thing always remains the same.
    The gallery is completely focused on showing art of Los Alamos and northern New Mexico.

  • Winter weather is here and Los Alamos County reminded residents this week of some important safety considerations for motorists to take to make travel as safe as possible.
    Motorists are encouraged to equip their vehicles with chains and/or snow tires and carry a container of sand and a shovel in their vehicle.
    Motorists should make sure their vehicle is ready for winter driving by making sure the washer fluid reservoir is topped off with washer fluid that is winter rated, the windshield wipers are functional and working properly, the defroster is in good working order, each vehicle is equipped with a functional ice scraper, and that snow is cleared from the windows, roof and hood of the vehicle before traveling.
    Barrels of sand for public use are placed at locations that historically become icy and slick during storms, including:
    • San Ildefonso South at both ends of the guardrail
    • North Mesa Road east of the roundabout
    • Near the end of 37th Street off of Diamond Drive
    • At the dead end of Gold Street/Arroyo Lane
    • Near the intersection of State Road 4 and Rover in White Rock
    • Near the intersection of North Road and Quemazon
    • Other locations within Quemazon.

  • TODAY
    Astronomy Show: Cosmic Distance Scale at 7 p.m. at the Nature Center. Join Dr. Rick Wallace for a presentation and discussion about the distance to celestial objects. Cost is $6 for adults, $4 for children. More information at peecnature.org.
    SATURDAY
    Christmas Arts and Crafts Fair from 9 a.m.-3 p.m. at Immaculate Heart of Mary Catholic Church Parish Hall, 3700 Canyon Road. Food for purchase will be available. Great Christmas shopping opportunity.

    Feature Film: Mysteries of the Unseen World at 2 p.m. at the Nature Center. Discover what is normally too fast, too slow, too small, or outside the visible spectrum. There is far more to nature than meets the eye. Cost is $6 for adults, $4 for children.
    SUNDAY
    Feature Film: Mysteries of the Unseen World at 2 p.m. at the Nature Center. Discover what is normally too fast, too slow, too small, or outside the visible spectrum. There is far more to nature than meets the eye. Cost is $6 for adults, $4 for children.
    MONDAY
    Nature Playtimes at 10 a.m. at the Nature Center. Join local families for fun in nature. Free. More information at peecnature.org.