.....Advertisement.....
.....Advertisement.....

Features

  • The Los Alamos Garden Club ‘s 2017 scholarship recipient is Madeline Makenzie Beck.
    The club chose Beck as she is an exceptionally well-rounded student, with excellent grades and many athletic achievements.
    Additionally, Beck is a volunteer in community service organizations such as the Special Olympics, the Nature Center and Reaching Through Reading.
    The club particularly appreciated her environmental efforts in the Los Alamos High School ECO Club and her own home garden. They wished her continued success as she pursues her course of study in Exercise Science at Montana State University.

  • BY KELLY DOLEJSI
    Special to the Monitor
    The classic Spanish film, “The Spirit of the Beehive” (“El Espiritu de la Colmena”) (1973, subtitled) will screen at 6:30 p.m. Thursday in Mesa Public Library’s upstairs meeting-room theater. The free screening is part of the Mesa Public Library Free Film Series.

    Set in 1940, the film, which won multiple awards for best actor (Ana Torrent) and best director (Victor Erice), and is listed on Roger Ebert’s “Great Movies” list, begins when inhabitants of a small Spanish town gather to watch the 1931 masterpiece “Frankenstein.”

    Later that night and unable to sleep, one of the children, Ana (Ana Torrent) asks her slightly older sister why the monster killed the young girl. Isabel (Isabel Telleria) responds that he didn’t – that it was fake, a trick – and further, that she’s seen the monster for real, as a spirit.

    Isabel’s story leads Ana to a misunderstanding that leads to potentially serious consequences for her and her family. 

  • TODAY

    The Jemez Thrift Shop will hold a bag day from 10 a.m.-4 p.m.

    THURSDAY

    Los Alamos Farmers Market is every Thursday in the Mesa Public Library parking lot from 7 a.m.-12:30 p.m.

     

    The Los Alamos High School Spring Dance Show will be at 7 p.m. Thursday at Duane Smith Auditorium. This year’s show will feature ballroom, Latin, swing, ballet, hip-hop, juggling, Bollywood and modern dance. Admission is free.

     

    Los Alamos County will host a variety of activities for Star Wars Day. Activities include photos with Star Wars Movie characters, free stickers and temporary tattoos, arts and crafts at the Mesa Public Library, the Teen Center and the Youth Activity Center from 2-5 p.m. and an all-ages costume and Lego contest at Ashley Pond.

     

    Thursday, June 8
    A Different Way (6-week course)
    A Different Way provides an opportunity to reconnect with your values, and discover how simple living intersects with sustainability--at personal and global levels. 6:00 PM - 7:30 PM Admission: Participation is FREE, but purchase of the course book is REQUIRED. 

    FRIDAY

  • The New Mexico Department of Game and Fish is seeking public comment on upland game hunting rules for the 2018 to 2022 seasons.
    The department will present its initial proposals for the 2018-22 upland game seasons, including dates and bag limits, to the State Game Commission at its May 11 meeting at the Community Center on Air Park Road in at the Municipal Airport in Clayton.
    Comments about upland game rules can be emailed to casey.cardinal@state.nm.us or sent by postal mail to Casey Cardinal, New Mexico Department of Game and Fish, P.O. Box 25112, Santa Fe, N.M. 87504. The department’s proposal will be posted to the department’s website, wildlife.state.nm.us.
    A public meeting about the proposals will be conducted at:
    • New Mexico Department of Game and Fish Northwest Area Office, 6:30-8:30 p.m. May 17, 3841 Midway Place, N.E., Albuquerque.


  • Star Paving will start construction activities on the North Mesa Improvements Phase I Project the week of May 1.
    Proposed improvements include roadway reconstruction of the following streets:
    • Camino Uva (from San Ildefonso to the cul-de-sac), and
    • Camino Durasnilla (from San Ildefonso to Camino Uva).  
    More specifically, the proposed work involves removal and replacement of asphalt surfacing, curb, gutter, sidewalks (at required locations), drive pads, ADA curb ramps and drainage structures.
    Work hours will be Monday through Friday, 7 a.m. – 5 p.m. Access to residents as well as services such as mail delivery, emergency services, trash and recycling collection will be maintained.
    On street parking, will be restricted for the duration of the construction project. Residents are asked to find alternate parking on adjacent streets.
    Questions/comments call the Public Works Department at 662-8150 or send an email to LACPW@lacnm.us.

  • Officials with the Los Alamos Department of Public Utilities are encouraging customers to devote 10 minutes to rate the DPU’s performance in providing electric, natural gas, water and wastewater services.   The seventh biennial customer satisfaction survey is kicking off this week.
    An independent firm, Southwest Planning and Marketing is conducting a phone survey with some online options. Data from DPU’s residential and commercial customers will be compiled, interpreted and presented in a report.  DPU will post the report in June on the DPU website losalamosnm.us/government/departments/utilities/ and make it available in its office located at 1000 Central Avenue, Suite 130, Los Alamos.
    Information provided by customers is used by the DPU to plan for future improvements and enhancements. “I hope our customers will take the time to participate in the satisfaction survey,” stated Utilities Manager Timothy Glasco. “Our customers are important to us. We want to ensure that we are meeting their current and future utility service needs, while providing exceptional customer service.”
    For more information or questions, call or email the DPU at 662-8333 or CustomerCare@lacnm.us.

  • The Atomic Heritage Foundation and the Los Alamos Historical Society have launched an online “Ranger in Your Pocket” program on the Hans Bethe House on Bathtub Row at Los Alamos, NM. AHF President Cindy Kelly explained, “During the Manhattan Project, two famous scientists lived in the Hans Bethe House. This program gives a unique glimpse into life at Los Alamos with first-hand accounts.”
    The Hans Bethe House is now the Harold Agnew Cold War Gallery of the Los Alamos History Museum. Formerly called Master Cottage Number One, it was the first residence built by the Los Alamos Ranch School. The director of the school, A. J. Connell, lived there briefly before it became home for the school’s masters (teachers). But, as LAHS Executive Director Heather McClenahan explains in one of the vignettes, “The building caught on fire. When A. J. rebuilt the building, he built it out of stone.” Today, tourists can visit what was originally just a little stone rectangle but was expanded over the decades.
    The quaint cottage has been home to eminent scientists. During the Manhattan Project, Edwin and Elsie McMillan moved into the house with their young daughter, Ann. When they moved out, Hans and Rose Bethe moved in. Both Edwin and Hans would go on to win Nobel Prizes for their scientific contributions.

  • Los Alamos Boy Scout Troop 122 hosted a youth leadership training session at Historic Los Luceros on March 5.
    In addition to enjoying the facilities and turkeys, the boy scouts cleaned out an irrigation ditch as a service project, helping prepare the location for the growing season. 
    Youth leaders learned team building and position responsibilities, developing skills to lead their troop and become mature young men to lead in their community. 
    “We were thrilled to host the boys of Troop 122,” said Historic Sites Director Patrick Moore. “Their contributions in helping clean the irrigation ditch was symbolic of not only the guiding principles of scouting, but also supported a time-honored agricultural tradition in preparing the acequia for the coming planting season. The best of combining service with New Mexico heritage.”
    Founded in 1953, Troop 122 continues to be highly active in the Los Alamos and surrounding areas, teaching life skills to boys using an outdoor program.
    Los Alamos area boy scouts interested in learning more about Troop 122 can attend a scout meeting to meet the scoutmaster Mr. Mosier, and the diverse group of scouts. Meetings are held Thursday nights from 7-8:30 p.m. at the First United Methodist Church in Los Alamos located next door to Sullivan Field.

  • If you’ve noticed your pet’s eye lenses becoming cloudy or opaque, your pet could be developing cataracts. Though cataracts can decrease vision, or even cause complete blindness, not every companion animal that develops cataracts requires surgery. Dr. Lucien Vallone, clinical assistant professor at the Texas A&M College of Veterinary Medicine & Biomedical Sciences, explained how cataracts can affect pets.
    “A cataract is an opacity of the lens,” Vallone said. “A clear lens is necessary for good vision; thus, any opacification can cause decreased vision. However, not all cataracts are the same. Some cases of cataracts are so severe they can cause blindness and inflammation in the eye, which may cause significant discomfort. Some cases are small enough they don’t interfere with vision at all and should be monitored.”
    All companion animals can develop cataracts, but Vallone said cataracts are common in dogs. Several breeds of dogs may be predisposed to cataracts, though not every dog within these breeds are affected.

  • April 29-May 6
    For information, call the Betty Ehart Senior Center (BESC) at 662-8920, the White Rock Senior Center (WRSC) at 672-2034 and “Day Out” (adult day care, 8 a.m.-4 p.m.) at 661-0081. Reservations: by 10 a.m. for lunches.

    Betty Ehart

    MONDAY    
    8:45 a.m.         Cardio
    9 a.m.        Pilates
    9:45 a.m.        Matter of Balance Class
    10 a.m.        Senior Civic Discussion             group
    11:30 a.m.        Lunch: Chef Salad
    6 p.m.        Argentine Tango Dancing
    7 p.m.        Ballroom Dancing
    TUESDAY
    8:45 a.m.        Variety Training
    11:30 a.m.        Lunch: Hamburger with             Cheese
    1 p.m.        Party Bridge
    7:30 p.m.        Table Tennis
    WEDNESDAY    
    8:30 a.m.–1 p.m.    NO LAVA Quilters

  • The Los Alamos Animal Shelter, 226 East Road, (505) 662-8179, has a great selection of adoptable pets just waiting for their forever home, so come adopt your new best friend today! All adoptable pets are micro-chipped, spayed or neutered, and up-to-date on vaccinations. Shelter hours are 12–6 p.m. Monday through Friday, 11 a.m. – 4 p.m. Saturday, and 12–3 p.m. Sunday.
    Be sure to check out our website at lafos.org, where you can get more information about volunteering, adopting, and donating.
    CATS
    Mr. Whiskers—A big tabby cat that is about 4 years old. Changes are a bit stressful for him, so he will likely need a little bit of time to adjust to his new home. He can be independent, but he’s also very sweet and likes to snuggle when he’s in the mood! He is OK with mellow cats, but other dominant males sometimes bother him.
    Wally—A handsome and regal 3-year-old tabby. He has beautiful, inquisitive eyes that draw in volunteers and shelter visitors, and he loves when volunteers open his kennel to pet him. Wally came to the shelter as a stray, so we don’t know much about his history, but he’s excited about finding a home that will keep him inside and make him part of the family.

  • On a beautiful spring Saturday morning, a few local ladies (and a few men) gathered in the Memorial Rose Garden with Extension Officer Carlos Valdez to learn tips and tricks for pruning rose bushes. The New Mexico State University Cooperative Extension Service has been working with the Garden Club every year for 30 years on this particular talk.
    “It’s been a great relationship that we’ve had,” Valdez said, and thanked the Garden Club for providing all the beautiful roses in the garden. The Los Alamos Garden Club has been in place since the mid-1940s and has taken care of the Memorial Rose Garden since 1957.
    Although the workshop focused on pruning rose bushes, Valdez began the morning with general information concerning planting and rose care.
    Extra tip: It is best to ease into the growing season with water and fertilizer. In the same way, ease out of the season gently with those things.
    Plantings Roses: To explain most of his tips, Valdez used the example of bare root roses. “Find yourself a reputable rose supplier. You want to purchase the highest grade of rose that you can get,” he said. Once the rose bush is purchased, soak overnight in a bucket of water and plant it the following day.

  • Green thumbs moving to Los Alamos often get a shock. Not only is the soil difficult to work with, but the water situation is a little tough, too.
    One can go all winter without a drop and a very expensive water bill, and then suddenly wake up to a deluge when the spring arrives. It can destroy all the hard work of nursing that flower or vegetable garden through yet another tough year. With the lowest annual precipitation count of six inches and a high of 30(!) inches, New Mexico is indeed a land of contrasts.
    So.. what to do? The New Mexico State University Los Alamos County Cooperative Extension Office suggests the key to lessening water bills and frustrations is to just go with the flow. Instead of planting Touch Me Nots, Black-Eyed Susans and Spiderworts, try for something a little closer to home, plants native to New Mexico that are just as pretty and can thrive on little to no water.
    For vegetable gardening, a little research into how the Native Americans thrived up here on the Pajarito Plateau can go a long way. They did it on just a little water and very little work. The Three Sisters technique has been used by the pueblo indians for centuries. They discovered that planting beans, squash and corn together results in a garden that’s virtually maintenance free, even in the driest and toughest of conditions.

  • TODAY
    Join the Los Alamos History Museum for an exhibit opening from 3-5 p.m. Friday in the Los Alamos History Museum Rotating Gallery. Culture and Collaboration: The Los Alamos/Japan Project explores the goals of this unique intercultural initiative to create understanding through shared history, partnerships, dialogue, multiple perspectives, and collaboration. On display through July 9.

    Astronomy Show: Solar System Revelations
at 7 p.m. at the Nature Center. Dr. Galen Gisler uncovers new revelations about our Solar System. Cost is $6 for adults, $4 for children.
    SATURDAY
    Earth Day Festival from 10 a.m.-2 p.m. at the Nature Center.
Join us to celebrate Earth Day at the Los Alamos Nature Center, where there will be engaging activities, fun entertainment, and delicious food. Free.
     
    Saturday to March 5:
Earth Day Feature Film: We are Stars
at 12:30 p.m. at the Nature Center. This exciting, family-friendly film connects us to the evolution of the Universe and explores the secrets of our cosmic chemistry. Cost is $6 for adults, $4 for children.

  • TODAY
    Astronomy Show: Star Stories - Color
at 7 p.m. at the Nature Center. Cost is  $6 for adults, $4 for children.

    Fish Fry Friday from 5-7 p.m. at Immaculate Heart Mary Parish Hall, 3700 Canyon Road. Cost is $10 for Adults, $7 for children.

    Middle-schoolers invited to participate in Dance For A Cure at 7:30 p.m. at the Los Alamos County Sheriff’s Posse Shack. Cost is $5. Pizza while supplies last. Benefits the American Cancer Society.
    SATURDAY
    Feature Film: “Sea Monsters, A Prehistoric Adventure” at 2 p.m. at the Nature Center. 
Cost is $6 for adults, $4 for children.
     
    Coffee with the Warden
from 10:30 a.m.-1:30 p.m. at the Nature Center. Bring wildlife questions and talk with the local Game & Fish warden Amos Smith. Free.
    SUNDAY
    Feature Film: Sea Monsters, “A Prehistoric Adventure” at 2 p.m. at the Nature Center. See prehistoric sea creatures come to life, and follow fossil hunters to remote locations as they excavate the remains of some of the most awe-inspiring creatures of all time. Cost is $6 for adults, $4 for children. More information at peecnature.org.
     

  • The Los Alamos Nature Center is ending the month with a star workshop at 7 p.m. April 28 and an exciting astronomy film “Phantom of the Universe” at 2 p.m. April 29 and 30.
    The Friday star workshop is a family-friendly two-hour program that starts by charting the major constellations in the planetarium. Then, weather permitting, participants will practice identifying objects and constellations outside the nature center. Educator Jon Lorenz will weave Greek and Southwest Native American star legends of the visible constellations in view. Space is limited. Visit peecnature.org/planetarium to register.
    “Phantom of the Universe” is a full-dome planetarium show that showcases an exciting exploration of dark matter, from the Big Bang to its anticipated discovery at the Large Hadron Collider. This film will play at 2 p.m. on both Saturday and Sunday.

  • This month’s Military Order of the World Wars Chapter 229 meeting will start at 6 p.m. Tuesday at the Los Alamos Research Park the second floor conference room.
    The speaker will be Rep. Stephanie Garcia-Richard. She will be reporting on actions taken in this year’s annual New Mexico legislative session.
    The meeting will begin with a social period, followed by a brief business meeting and dinner at 6:25 p.m. The presentation will begin at about 7:15 p.m.
    The Military Order of the World Wars dinner meetings are open to interested citizens for the dinner and program with RSVP, or the program only at no cost. The Hot Rocks Java Café staff will be catering the dinner: Pork tenderloin and appropriate side dishes. Cost of the dinner is $25 per person. A dinner reservation made is a commitment to the chapter to pay for the reserved dinner(s). RSVP either with a yes or no for the dinner by Sunday.
    Call LTC Gregg Giesler, USA Retired, Chapter Commander, 662-5574 (g.gieslercomputer.org) or Eleanor Pinyan, 672-3750 (email: depinyan@cybermesa.com).
     

  • Art exhibits
    The National Museum of Nuclear Science and History, 601 Eubank SE in Albuquerque, will host “Critical Assembly, the Secrets of Los Alamos 1944: An Installation by American Sculptor Jim Sanborn,” through Oct. 8. This special exhibit, created by world renowned sculptor Jim Sanborn – best known for creating the encrypted “Kryptos” sculpture at CIA headquarters in Langley, Virginia – invites visitors to explore and study the recreations of the super secret experiments from the Manhattan Project’s atomic bomb program. The museum is open from 9 a.m.- 5 p.m., 361 days a year. For information, visit nuclearmuseum.org, or call 505-245-2137.

    The Museum of International Folk Art will host the national touring exhibition Quilts of Southwest China, beginning July 9 through Jan. 21, 2018. While both highly valued and culturally significant, Chinese quilts have received little attention from scholars, collectors, and museums and little is known about them outside of the communities that make them. Works featured in the exhibition come from the collections of MOIFA, MSUM, the partnering Chinese museums and private lenders. A new bilingual publication (in English and Mandarin) accompanies the exhibition. Museum location is 706 Camino Lejo.

  • Pajarito Environmental Education Center and the Reel Deal Theater will show “Racing Extinction,” an undercover documentary exposing the hidden world of endangered species and the race to protect them from mass extinction, at 7 p.m. Thursday.
    This film is $10 for adults and $8 for seniors, students and children. Tickets are available at the Reel Deal Theater.
    Produced by Oceanic Preservation Society, the group behind the Academy Award®-winning film The Cove, Racing Extinction brings a voice to the thousands of species teetering on the very edge of life. This highly charged, impassioned collective of activists sets out to expose the two major threats to endangered wild species across the globe. The first comes from the international wildlife trade, and the medicinal “cures” and tonics that are marketed to the public at the expense of rare creatures. The second threat is carbon emissions and acidified oceans that are incompatible with existing animal life. Both threats are made clear in “Racing Extinction” through investigative reporting, undercover photography and covert operations.
    For more information about this and other programs offered by the Pajarito Environmental Education Center (PEEC), visit peecnature.org, email programs@peecnature.org, or call 662-0460.

  • Artists Jamie Winslow and Elaine Bradshaw will celebrate spring in O’Keefe country with the exhibit “A Sense of Place,” a show of engaging paintings and 3D works.
    Free and open to all ages, the art can be viewed daily from 9 a.m.-8 p.m. from April 29-May 28 at the Galleria Arriba at Abiquiu Inn.
    A public reception will be held from 5-7 p.m. May 5. During this time (and other times by appointment), the artists will be available to explain their techniques, answer questions and help visitors select pieces.
    About the artists
    Bradshaw paints “to celebrate the life force of the natural world, especially here in the high desert.” Through her energetic, colorful acrylic images, she hopes to help viewers to become more aware of and to connect with their own environments. She will display some fused glass works, as well.
    Winslow is a painter and sculptor who aims to intrigue viewers and to draw them into thoughtful dialogue with her pieces. She uses various media to express herself, and notes that her work  “has been described as organic, ethnic, contemporary and sometimes whimsical.” She delights in the joy that her art brings to her own life and to her collectors.