.....Advertisement.....
.....Advertisement.....

Features

  • An opportunity to participate in a $20 reduced fee microchip clinic will be offered at the 2011 Dog Jog April 16. Veterinarians from the Animal Clinic of Los Alamos and Ridgeview Veterinary Hospital have donated their time and expertise to implant the microchips. The fee includes the registration of the microchip to a database that can be read by shelters and veterinary clinics throughout the United States. No sign is up required ahead of time, just stop by Chamisa School in White Rock from 9:00-10:30 am. The clinic is open to the public, even if you aren’t registered for the Dog Jog.

  • The flavor of the week is asset number 28, integrity, in the positive values category.
    An example of integrity is when a young person acts on their convictions and stands up for his or her beliefs. There’s a saying about integrity being what you do when no one is looking. I apologize for not being able to find the speaker of these words, even in the wide world of the Web.
    I did find another good one on my quest, from former Wyoming Senator Alan Simpson. Whether you agree with his politics or not, you might find the following quote interesting. “If you have integrity, nothing else matters. If you don’t have integrity, nothing else matters.”

  • Next Saturday, Los Alamos-area dogs and their people will gather at Chamisa Elementary in White Rock for a bit of exercise and to raise money for canines and felines, alike.
    The Dog Jog, sponsored by the Los Alamos Friends of the Shelter will kick off at 9 a.m., with registration at 8 a.m. April 16. The annual event has been held for the past 13 years, with 2011 marking its 14th year.  The Dog Jog is open to adults or children and their canine companions and is comprised of either a 5k run, or a two-mile walk.
    “You don’t have to be speedy,” said FOS past president Wendee Brunish. “Those who want to run can run, and those who want to walk can walk.”

  • Editor’s note: This is the third in a three-part series featuring the newest additions to the Living Treasures.
     
    On April 17 William “Bill” Chambers, Morris “Morrie” Pongratz and Stephanie Sydoriak will be recognized and honored as the newest members of Living Treasures of Los Alamos. The ceremony and reception, sponsored by Los Alamos National Bank, will begin at 2 p.m. at the Betty Ehart Senior Center. The public is invited to attend.

    William “Bill” H. Chambers

  • Libraries are places for new beginnings and making new connections. Whether someone’s getting their first library card, learning new computer skills, planning a trip, or enjoying a program with new friends, the library is the place where their story begins.
    During National Library Week, April 10-16, library patrons can join the nation’s libraries and librarians and create their own story at their local library.
    First sponsored in 1958, National Library Week is a national observance sponsored by the American Library Association and libraries across the country each April.  

  • Editor’s note: This is the first in a three-part series featuring the newest additions to the Living Treasures.

    On April 17, William “Bill” Chambers, Morris “Morrie” Pongratz and Stephanie Sydoriak will be recognized and honored as the newest members of Living Treasures of Los Alamos. The ceremony and reception, sponsored by Los Alamos National Bank, will begin at 2 p.m. at the Betty Ehart Senior Center. The public is invited to attend.
    This annual event is an opportunity to celebrate the contributions of individuals who have enhanced life on the Hill. Friends, family and co-workers are encouraged to participate in the ceremony by sharing stories and memories about each new treasure.

  • Art openings
    “Two Four One,” an exhibit of landscape photography by Victoria Rogers and collaborative abstracts by Victoria Rogers and Cal Haines will open with a reception at 2 p.m. Sunday at the Unitarian Church, 107 W. Barcelona Road, Santa Fe. The exhibit will run through April 30. For more information call 989-1088.

    The Museum of International Folk Art in Santa Fe, opens a major exhibition, “Folk Art of the Andes,” April 17. This will be the first exhibit in the United States to feature a broad range of folk art from the Andean region of South America, showcasing more than 850 works of art primarily dating from the 19th and 20th centuries. The exhibit runs through February 2012.

  • Reservations are being taken for Dixon Apple Orchard’s Springtime Chuckwagon event from 4-7:30 p.m. April 16 and 2-5:30 p.m. April 17.
    Take a journey back into the old west … sit back, relax and enjoy live music and scenery as Carl Hawkins of “Hawkins Chuckwagon” rustles up a meal cooked over an open fire in Dutch ovens.
    Cabin Orchard Hayrides will weave attendees through the entire Dixon’s Apple Orchard on a tractor-pulled hay wagon. An explanation of its history and operation will be given.
    Attendees will spend time at the Old Log Cabin built at the turn of the century.

  • Reservations are being taken for Dixon Apple Orchard’s Springtime Chuckwagon event from 4-7:30 p.m. April 16 and 2-5:30 p.m. April 17.
    Take a journey back into the old west … sit back, relax and enjoy live music and scenery as Carl Hawkins of “Hawkins Chuckwagon” rustles up a meal cooked over an open fire in Dutch ovens.
    Cabin Orchard Hayrides will weave attendees through the entire Dixon’s Apple Orchard on a tractor-pulled hay wagon. An explanation of its history and operation will be given.
    Attendees will spend time at the Old Log Cabin built at the turn of the century.

  • Presenter Kristi Beguin has designed a class for pregnant women, women who are considering pregnancy and people who will support them.  
    The class, which will teach attendees about herbal and natural remedies, will be offered from 6-8 p.m. Friday at Pajario Environmental Education Center.  
    Topics include a variety of herbs and natural remedies that can nourish and support a woman’s body during all the stages of pregnancy, including the post-partum months.              

  • Charlotte “Charlee” Shroyer, one of the artists in “Art: Dewey Decimal,” at Fuller Lodge, has been named a first place winner in the 2011 Top Ten International Women in the Arts competition, sponsored by ARTROM Gallery, Rome, Italy.
    Artists from more than 20 countries participated in this competition honoring the creative energy of women.
    Long fascinated by Cistercian abbeys and medieval architecture of Europe, Shroyer paints women of the ages. Often with animals at their sides, these paintings are much more than just female figures — they tell stories of women’s historical and emotional passages through time.  

  • Charlotte “Charlee” Shroyer, one of the artists in “Art: Dewey Decimal,” at Fuller Lodge, has been named a first place winner in the 2011 Top Ten International Women in the Arts competition, sponsored by ARTROM Gallery, Rome, Italy.
    Artists from more than 20 countries participated in this competition honoring the creative energy of women.
    Long fascinated by Cistercian abbeys and medieval architecture of Europe, Shroyer paints women of the ages. Often with animals at their sides, these paintings are much more than just female figures — they tell stories of women’s historical and emotional passages through time.  

  • It is unusual to have an artist paint a complete set for an opera, but that is exactly what Los Angeles Chicano artist Gronk is doing during the month of April.  He is in residence in the Opera’s Stieren Hall, creating the visuals for this summer’s production of Vivaldi’s “Griselda.”  
    As director Peter Sellars explains, “I don’t know what he is going to do, I have not told him anything.  When an artist paints, he creates a special environment in which the singers will perform.”  Gronk prepared the set for the 2005 production of Golijov’s “Ainadamar,” covering the walls and the floor with his singular perspective on the opera.

  • It is unusual to have an artist paint a complete set for an opera, but that is exactly what Los Angeles Chicano artist Gronk is doing during the month of April.  He is in residence in the Opera’s Stieren Hall, creating the visuals for this summer’s production of Vivaldi’s “Griselda.”  
    As director Peter Sellars explains, “I don’t know what he is going to do, I have not told him anything.  When an artist paints, he creates a special environment in which the singers will perform.”  Gronk prepared the set for the 2005 production of Golijov’s “Ainadamar,” covering the walls and the floor with his singular perspective on the opera.

  • Interests are often as diverse and as unique as the individual.  Regardless of where one’s interests lie, the library usually has something for everyone, and this month, the Fuller Lodge Art Center serves as a visual library just waiting to be perused, as the newest exhibition, “Art: Dewey Decimaled,” makes its debut with an opening from 5-7 p.m. Friday.

  • The Pajarito Spanish Dance Alliance will present its first recital of Flamenco and Spanish Dance at 3 p.m. April 16 in the Pajarito Room at Fuller Lodge.  
    The company is directed by Ellen Walton and includes students and professional artists from Los Alamos, Taos, Santa Fe, Dixon and La Jara.   
    Arturo Montoya, Kevin Rendón and Robert Romero will be on guitar. Dancers Catalina Rio Fernandez, Mary Woolston and Ellen Walton will join students Emily Brown, Bob Davis, Chris Jeffrey, Donna Martin, Opale Schappert, Annie Smith and Diane Trujillo in a variety of both, traditional Flamenco and classical Spanish dances.  

  • Karen Wray Fine Art Gallery will have a reception for its exhibit, “Old West, New West,” featuring the works of local artists Tim Althauser, Danne DeBacker, Cindy Valdez, Connie Pacheco and Kathy Hjeresen, from 5-7 p.m. April 29.
    “It feels like I’ve won the lottery every time I sell a painting … and now it’s happening more and more often,” said Nambé painter, Tim Althauser.
    He recently sold a painting to a collector in Dallas and a big painting to another collector in San Francisco. He has 10 paintings in the Downey Gallery on Canyon Road in Santa Fe, and he may have already sold the half-finished painting on his easel.

  • Thanks for a
    successful event

    On Feb. 27, over 300 performers and listeners volunteered to raise $1,475 for the first annual Music Marathon to help support UNM-Los Alamos.
    Thanks to Bonnie Gordon for publicity, treats and staying 10 hours; Steve Ciddio and David Eliot for moving furniture all day;  Diane Vaughan for using her expertise and money for programs, teachers who prepared pupils for the Student Musicale: Charlene Cox-Clifton, Lynn Lamb, Donald Machen, Frances Naffziger (and always bringing punch), Kay Newnam, Ellen Scudder, Janna Warren; LANB for program aid, Robin Gurule for green chile chicken stew, homemade bread and playing.

  • The annual meeting of the League of Women Voters of Los Alamos will be on Saturday at the Bethlehem Evangelical Lutheran Church, 2390 North Road.  
    The day will begin at 9:30 a.m. with coffee and conversation, followed by a business meeting and potluck lunch.
    At 12:30 p.m. Los Alamos County Department of Public Utilities Manager John Arrowsmith will talk about the county’s Smart Grid and Smart House projects.  
    The Smart Grid includes a 2 megawatt photovoltaic solar array on the old landfill; a large-scale battery storage system and a demonstration home built with the latest construction techniques, smart meters, and smart appliances for optimized power consumption.  

  • A great documentary, like any film, needs to erase the furniture you’re sitting on, the floor, the walls, the temperature of the room, hunger, stress, responsibilities, ego — the complete tangible and intangible context that exists off-screen.
    Martin Scorses’s “No Direction Home,” is an incredible eraser. But when I initially sat down to review the two-part, 208-minute documentary that spans the early evolution of Bob Dylan’s career, I had my doubts.
    I love much of Dylan’s music, from his self-titled debut with its witty folk standards to his more stream-of-consciousness lyrics of the mid-1960s and 1970s. “Subterranean Homesick Blues” is on my running play list in my iPod.