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Features

  • After the success of the first run, Atomic City Circuit Riders are warming up for another fundraiser effort for the Los Alamos Relay for Life.

    The team, which is from the First United Methodist Church, will hold a musical revue and barbecue dinner at 5:30 p.m. May 31 at the church’s Fellowship Hall.

    Discipleship Coordinator Ann LePage said, members of the congregation will take the stage.

    “We have volunteers come and perform something of their choice,” she said.

    All types of music will be represented, including Cajun music.

  • At 7:30 p.m. tonight at Fuller Lodge Melissa Riedel will perform a concert.

    Riedel is a former student of Karolyn Coulter and recently graduated summa cum laude from the University of New Mexico with a bachelor’s degree in vocal performance.

    During the concert Friday, Riedel will perform a work titled, “Galgenlieder” by contemporary composer Jan Koetsier, and will be joined by Sean Kennedy, a tuba player. She will also sing works by Mozart, Tchaikovsky, Cole Porter and Jerome Kern. She will be joined by Keiko Shimono, pianist.

  • It may be the end of the school year, but learning opportunities can continue throughout the summer season.

     

    Whether it is producing works of art at the Art Center at Fuller Lodge or exploring the mysteries of outer space at the New Mexico Museum of Space History in Alamogordo, knowledge is available everywhere.

     

    For the last three years, the Emily L. Bradley Memorial Fund has helped sixth-grade students engage in learning.

     

  • Igor and the Red Elvises have conquered the hearts of screaming fans all over the world for more than 10 years with diverse, upbeat music and amusing lyrics. Now it’s Los Alamos turn to scream with glee when the band returns to town at 7 p.m. Friday.

    The band’s performance, which will be held at Los Alamos National Bank, is part of the Los Alamos County Summer Concert Series.

    Constantly touring the globe, Igor and the Red Elvises have gained a long-standing reputation as “the hardest working band in show business.”

  • I started this column in January as an experiment, but as anyone who read my previous four installments knows, it, uh, didn’t work. OK, it completely bombed and I didn’t get what I wanted at all.

    As it turns out, this was a very lucky, somewhat miraculous break.

    Here’s what I wanted: to try some different kinds of writing in order to expand my tiny bouillon cube of literary facility into a boiling broth of bibliographic excellence.

  • Dinner for a good cause

    Knights of Columbus Bingo Night was a big success. Thanks to all who participated in the spaghetti dinner and Bingo night for the “Relay for Life – American Cancer Society” fund-raiser. A total of $1,810 was raised for this wonderful effort.

    Special thanks to Annie Trujillo-Garcia for making the wonderful spaghetti, Jackie Ciddo for selling tickets, Patti Levings for helping in the kitchen and Ray and Tina Chavez for helping to serve the food.

  • Ponderosa Montessori School is now the only school in New Mexico certified to train teachers in the Montessori method under the Montessori Accreditation Council for Teacher Education (MACTE). Ponderosa director Joan Ellard has worked in the field of Montessori education and teacher training since 1984, and has owned the school, formerly Sage Montessori, since 2002.

  • Three of the four teams at Aspen Elementary School that competed in the Supercomputer Challenge earned awards for their efforts.

  • So you want to be a leader? Think you have what it takes to assume control?

    For six years, Leadership Los Alamos has helped locals develop the necessary skills and May 8, the newest crop of leaders celebrated graduation.

    So just what does it take to be a leader?

    William Phillips, who was the keynote speaker, said leadership requires having an open mind, being aware of the interdependency of all things, having a passion for leadership and helping others and learning compassion.

  • Patricia Rogers, a former Los Alamos County Councilor and currently an Albuquerque resident, and Martha Hawkins of Los Alamos, were among the 151,000 spectators who watched an unknown horse from New Mexico achieve victory during the Kentucky Derby.

    Mine That Bird raced from obscurity into fame during the 135th derby, May 2 in Louisville, Ky.

    Hawkins said she and her friend turned to each other during the race and exclaimed, “Number 8! What’s the name of that horse?”

  • A Mother’s Day Performance of “The Music Man” had people on their feet by the end of the performance. Julia Fair, Daren Savage and Melissa Balice directed and choreographed the combined Chamisa and Pinon Elementary School production of “The Music Man.”

  • The New Mexico Jewish Historical Society (NMJHS) will honor two individuals for their contributions to the organization at its annual meeting at 2 p.m. Sunday at Congregation Beit Tikva, 2230 Old Pecos Trail, in Santa Fe. Keynote speaker for the meeting will be noted historian and author Henry J. Tobias. NMJHS members and the public are invited to attend this meeting at no charge.

  • I have to come out and say it. I am not knowledgeable of the show, “Star Trek.” I don’t think I’ve ever seen a whole episode of the TV show. When I was little, I thought the character who wore the cool glittering band around his eyes was dreamy but that’s the extent of my “Star Trek” experience.

    So when I went to watch the movie, I wasn’t too sure what to expect. I have heard some chatter from people with far more know-how about the TV show that the movie wasn’t quite loyal to all the details of the original story.

  • When I was a kid, I listened to the story, “Sarah, Plain and Tall” on audio tape. Later in sixth-grade, I read the book. I always loved the story, especially the part about the family sliding into the hay in the barn.

    So I was rather happy that the Los Alamos Little Theater decided to produce a theatrical version of this story.

    Like some fans of a certain work, I tend to get a little uptight when others take artistic liberties from the original story. In this case, LALT decided to create some animosity between Sarah and the little girl, Anna.

  • The modern phrase is “blended families,” a family with a parent who has been married before and has lost a spouse through divorce or death. Depending on what source is consulted, a third to half of all children in the United States today will be part of blended families before they reach the age of 18.

  • There is more than just 80 years of history located at Fuller Lodge. This time capsule is bursting with stories.

    For Craig Martin, co-author of “Of Logs and Stone: The Buildings of Los Alamos Ranch School and Bathtub Row,” one of these stories begins with him listening to his daughter’s piano recital nine years ago at Fuller Lodge.

    Martin said he was so excited to hear his daughter play on that grand piano at the lodge when he suddenly smelled smoke. It was the first time, he said, he caught a whiff of the smoke from the Cerro Grande Fire.

  • I have no personal experience to draw from, but being a mother looks tough. I constantly see my sister racing after her kids to make sure they are safe and are behaving themselves.

    Her infant’s cries wake her and her husband up at night, and her toddlers’ activities keep her busy driving the car.

    But then again, motherhood doesn’t seem to be all craziness. I’ve seen my sister’s and her kids’ faces shine with delight as they read a story on the couch. It is also touching to see the youngsters give their mom a hug.

  • Today we look at Asset #10, Safety. According to the Search Institute, “Youth are more likely to grow up healthy when they feel safe at home, at school and in the community.”

    This week, the counselors of the Los Alamos Public School District pursued a training called, A Change of Heart.

    The goal of the training is a prevention-based approach to a state mandate to reduce bullying in the schools. This program is an attempt to change school climate by implementing an assets approach.

  • Nine college-bound high school students from northern New Mexico have been selected for scholarships and an achievement award administered by the J. Robert Oppenheimer Memorial Committee.

    The students are from Los Alamos, Pojoaque Valley and Santa Fe high schools.

    The JROMC has awarded 136 scholarships and other awards totaling $268,000 since the program begun in 1984.

    The philanthropic organization’s scholarship program is supported by several endowments, numerous small, individual donations and major contributions from the Los Alamos National Bank.

  • Looking back at your childhood, what memories come to mind? Having family picnics at the park? Running through an open field with your friends? Gazing at the sky making shapes out of the clouds? How about attending the Los Alamos Kite Festival?