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Features

  • The Los Alamos County Library System’s summer reading program kicks off with theatrical flair.

    On Monday, members of Wise Fool Puppets will bring their performances and knowledge of puppetry to Mesa Public Library and White Rock Branch Library.

    The show begins at 4 p.m. in White Rock and at 7 p.m. at Mesa Public Library.

    Amy Christian, co-artistic director of Wise Fool, said they will talk about how the puppets are created, allow children to climb into their life-size puppets and perform little skits throughout the program.

  • David Thurston, a biology and geology teacher at Los Alamos High School, was diagnosed with acute myelogenous leukemia (AML) at the end of the school year.

    While Thurston is undergoing treatment at the University of New Mexico Hospital in Albuquerque, high school students have been busy finding ways to support him. He will soon be heading out to California for a bone marrow transplant.

  • This week we take a look at Asset #15, Positive Peer lnfluence. According to the Search-Institute, “Youth are more likely to grow up healthy when their best friends model responsible behavior.”

    While you can’t choose your child’s friends, you can have a big impact on their friendships. From the time our kids were tiny, my friend Karen and I knew we wanted to have the “hangout house.”

    You know the house you see on the Tyson food commercials when the kids come home from school with friends and want to eat you out of house and home.

  • When Miriam and Rolland Perry arrived in Los Alamos with their young family in the spring of 1943, the Perrys found no other members of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints.  

    Sixty years later, this has all changed.

    They worked with people of other faiths to organize a community Sunday School, which later became the United Church, where they became active.  

  • It’s evolved since it was first created, not to mention traveled. It can be spotted anywhere from Main Street to the moon. Although it’s been torn, stained and burned, it has never ceased to exist.  

    With these qualities, the American flag is much like the country it represents so on Sunday the community is invited to join the Elks Lodge No. 2083 at 1 p.m. Sunday at Ashley Pond to celebrate Flag Day.  

  • Pixar/Disney is cunning. I watch  previews for the movies the company produces and never really have a clear idea about the movie. Yet, the short blips always wet my appetite to watch their movies.

    So when I watched a preview for “Up,” which showed a house with thousands of party balloons floating through the air and an old man sitting on the porch saying “Howdy,” I was ready to immediately head to the theater.

  • I remember when my parents first brought her home 14 years ago. My sister and I drove up to the driveway one day and she and our mom were sitting out in the front yard.

    It was kind of a surprise. I didn’t even know they were considering getting another one.

    There had been a brief period of time since we said our final goodbyes to our last dog, a black Labrador Retriever named Scituate and it was eerie without him around. It was a little too quiet, a little emptier in the house. So I could understand why my parents wanted another dog.

  • Los Alamos is cooking up something completely different Saturday. It is spiced with flavors from around the world and served with the noblest of intentions.

    Taste of Los Alamos, an international food festival, will be held from 2-5 p.m. Saturday at Fuller Lodge. The event is a fundraiser for this year’s  local Relay for Life.

    While several Los Alamos residents with nationalities outside of the U.S. are participating in the event, the program   is partnering with English as a Second Language Professor Cindy Eaton’s students at UNM-LA.  

  • Imagine – or remember – what it was like growing up in Los Alamos in the 1940s and ‘50s. Well-armed guards kept the gates to the so-called Atomic City. Visitors needed special passes. Their vehicles were routinely searched.

    Imagine – or remember – what it was like growing up in Los Alamos in the 1940s and ‘50s. Well-armed guards kept the gates to the so-called Atomic City. Visitors needed special passes. Their vehicles were routinely searched.

  • The Los Alamos County Recreation Division is accepting boat team registrations for its first-ever Cardboard Canoe Regatta, which will be held from 1-5 p.m. June 20 at the Larry R. Walkup Aquatic Center.

  • Saturday, the downtown area will feature a few unusual sights – a sand pile, a pit of soapy foam, a few robots and some shiny cars.

    All these unique additions come courtesy of the Los Alamos Chamber of Commerce’s Chamberfest.

    From 10 a.m.-3 p.m. Saturday, the conventional routine will be put on hold for some fun the whole community can enjoy.

    Actually, the fun begins at 5 p.m. with  the Chamber’s banquet Friday at Central Avenue Grill.

  • Once again the community is welcomed to attend a free concert showcasing the Deborah Beene Music Scholarship winners, past and present.

    This year’s concert is the largest ever, with seven past award winners joining this year’s four winners.

    The annual Deborah Beene Award Winners Concert will be at 2 p.m. June 14 at the Betty Ehart Senior Center.

    Ranging from a freshman to graduating seniors, the talent in this year’s concert is hard to beat.

  • “If music be the food of love, play on.” So starts Shakespeare’s play, “Twelfth Night.”

    This brings to mind the beginning of the 52nd season of the Santa Fe Opera. For those who don’t know or have forgotten some of the rich, interesting history of the SFO, here are some facts.

  • With school over and summer vacation starting up, many local churches are offering an opportunity to continue children’s education.

    Trinity on the Hill Episcopal Church, Bethlehem Evangelical Lutheran Church and Los Alamos Church of Christ will help expand youngsters’ spiritual knowledge through Vacation Bible Schools.  

    Los Alamos Church

    of Christ

  • What is a Stay-cation?  Have you ever gone on a vacation and come home more tired than when you left?  

    How about returning home and discovering that you spent more money than you thought?  

    Now that’s a rude surprise.  

    With a Stay-cation you will experience the rest and relaxation of a vacation, but your family will be close to home and you won’t spend a dime.  

    There's no cooking for Mom and Dad either.  

    The Christian Church is hosting just such an event.

  • The slopes at Pajarito Mountain Ski Area may be completely bare of snow but the opportunities to have fun have not melted away with the summer heat.

    From 9 a.m.-5 p.m. Saturday, the ski area will rev up its Aspen chairlift and open its ski slopes for hikers and bikers during Summerfest.

    In addition to the hiking and biking activities, beer will be served from noon-5 p.m.

  • Friday, Los Alamos will get into a jazz groove, so put on your sunglasses and get ready to snap your fingers.

    Greg Abate, a jazz saxophonist, flutist and composer, along with the Pete Amahl Trio, will appear in the Los Alamos Summer Concert Series at 7 p.m. at Ashley Pond.

    Abate, according to his website, is an international jazz/recording artist.

  • Be Creative at Your Library is Los Alamos County Public Library System’s summer reading theme. Young patrons are invited to explore the worlds of music, dance, art, books and more. The 2009 Summer Reading Program is open to all young people, infant through young adult, and features programs, prize drawings, special event story hours, a reading club and more.

  • I walk into the grocery store, drive by Ashley Pond and meander down the sidewalks of Los Alamos almost every day, but recently I questioned just how much I see my surroundings.

    A few hours spent with my oldest nephew opened my eyes to everything this community offers.

    Saturday, my sister took her daughter to a ballet show, dropped her youngest son at our parent’s house while Connor hung out with me for a few hours.

  • You don’t get many chances to see Marlon Brando and Jack Nicholson together in the same film. In fact, you get only one. Although technically, you can watch the duo’s only shared release as many times as you like.