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Features

  • TV can be a real hazard – a roadblock on the path toward accomplishing any item on a to-do list. I’ve known people who avoid the contraption altogether because it makes them drift away from productivity. As a child, I took an art class at the local recreation center and I remember the teacher proudly commented her TV was stowed away in a closet and was only brought out in times of dire need – to watch landmark events in action or the newest big disaster.

  • “Impressionism in New Mexico,” the current exhibit at the Art Center at Fuller Lodge, truly embodies ACFL’s underlying philosophy: To enrich the human imagination through nurturing and supporting visual arts.

  • You’ve seen “Contact,” right? Jodie Foster, the Very Large Array, a very attractive wormhole?

    Robert Zemeckis’ 1997 adaptation of the Carl Sagan novel of the same time blew my dad away. Until I recently watched the film again, that was kind of all I remembered about it: My dad, going on and on about the awesomeness.

    It would be a pitiful understatement to say that when anyone mentions “Contact,” he gets starry-eyed. He gets Jodie-Foster-eyed. But mostly, he just believes.

  •   Safety is a lesson that can never be ignored, but to capture students’ attention, the presentation needs to be interesting. As one of the winners of Honeywell’s Got 2B Safe! Awards, Mountain Elementary School fifth grade teacher Sue Souza received a $500 Staples gift certificate to assist her in grabbing students’ attention about safety.

    What is her mechanism to accomplish this objective? Puppets.

    Souza said she wants to incorporate puppets in her lesson and wants students to create scripts.

    Why puppets?

  • Alex Kendrick’s “The Underground Radio II” was determined to be one of the top science projects in the world. Recently, he discovered what other scientific innovations the world has to offer.

    Kendrick visited the European Organization for Nuclear Research’s CERN from June 28-July 2. CERN is located near Geneva, Switzerland.

    Kendrick traveled with 13 other students, two of whom were from Albuquerque.

    CERN, according to its website, is the world’s largest particle physics laboratory.

  • The Los Alamos High School Hilltalkers are smooth talkers. Their speech abilities allowed them to compete six rounds of the National Forensic League’s National Tournament, held June 12-18 in Birmingham, Ala. The seven Hilltalkers needed eight ballots to break into the elimination round and earned seven.

    The policy debaters and the duo interpretation team were close to being placed in the top 60 teams but achieved a spot in the top 100.

    More than 300 high schools brought a total of 3,500 students to the competition.

  • When Kay Newnam played violin in the first Los Alamos Coffeehouse, she was pregnant. Now, her baby boy is 30 years old.

    And she is renewing the Coffeehouse for a special one-time event.

    After 112 concerts, the extremely popular Coffeehouse series came to an end in early 2008. However, in honor of the 60th anniversary of Los Alamos, Newnam, one the original founders of the Coffeehouse and a frequent performer, is teaming up with the Los Alamos Arts Council (LAAC) to bring fine chamber music and desserts to Fuller Lodge one more time.

  • Getting paid to do a little yard work is a typical summer activity for a teenager, but not many teens pay someone else for the opportunity to pull weeds in the July heat. Earlier this month 20 teens from Immaculate Heart of Mary Parish did just that.  

  • Zigfried “Zig” Hampel-Arias was recently awarded a Fulbright U.S. Student Program grant for the 2009-2010 academic year to Argentina. Hampel-Arias will in high-energy particle physics by conducting research with the Pierre Auger Cosmic Ray Observatory Collaboration in San Carlos de Bariloche. The Los Alamos native received his bachelor’s degree from Rice University and is a classically trained pianist who plans to take tango, dance and piano lessons while in Argentina.   

     

  • Although the Jimmy Stadler Band canceled its Friday performance in the Los Alamos County Summer Concert Series, it opened the door to allow for one of the series’ most popular bands to take the stage at 7 p.m. at Ashley Pond.

    The Nomads, currently comprised of local musicians Eddy Partridge, Wilfred Romero, Bob Carmen and David Banes, have been around since the 1980s, entertaining the crowd with rock n’ roll songs from the 1950s, 60s and 70s.

    “They play songs that everyone knows,” said concert organizer Russ Gordon.

  • Sage Cottage may normally be an institution of learning, but from 10 a.m.-2 p.m. Saturday, it will be the center for fun.

    A carnival, complete with a jumping house, milk bottle toss, bubble tub, arts and crafts table, face painting and music, will be open to children and their families.

    Additionally, a clown is scheduled to make an appearance and a juggler is expected  as well.

    Besides the carnival fare, food can be purchased and a silent auction, featuring everything from gift cards to a week’s vacation at a Pagosa Springs condo, will be offered.

  • Pinocchio,” is a familiar story. An animated puppet endures several trials to become a real boy.  Missoula Children’s Theater, however, inserted an educational twist to this classic tale. In order to become a real boy, Pinocchio needs to learn how to behave.

    The fictional character isn’t the only one learning a thing or two during the course of the play. The real-life actors are also gaining some knowledge by participating in this production.

  • Birthday parties have always been a big deal in my family. Since I was young, the dining room is always decorated with streamers and balloons and we are given the privilege of selecting the dinner menu, served on my great-grandmother’s hand-painted china.

    When my sister and I were little, we always requested a spaghetti dinner. When we were older, it was my mother’s triple layer chocolate cake that we constantly chose for dessert.

    Besides presents to the birthday person, my mother handed out goodie bags for each member of the family.

  • Following another spectacular sunset, a new production of Mozart’s “Don Giovanni” opened at the Santa Fe Opera last Saturday night, 222 years after its Prague premier.  A young cast of mostly fresh faces (five of the eight roles were SFO debuts, and three were former apprentices) took on this challenging classic, with varying amounts of success.

  • Young

    entrepreneurs

    On behalf of the Los Alamos Commerce and Development Corporation and the UNM-LA Small Business Development Center, we would like to extend a large thank you to the following companies, organizations and individuals for their support of the 2009 Youth Business Grant Program.  In its 24th year, the program provides an opportunity for youth in the area to learn the basics of entrepreneurship and business operation.  The program would not be possible without the contributions of time, money, and energy from a variety of sources.

  • This week we take a look at Asset #20, Time at Home.  According to the Search Institute, “Youth are more likely to grow up healthy when they go out ‘with nothing special to do’ two or fewer nights per week.”

    Now I’m glad that little quote comes directly from the Search Institute because I swear I heard audible gasps coming from homes throughout the community on that one. I think I’d like to rephrase this one to ask, do your children like to be at home?

  • Dean of Instruction Kate Massengale was recently granted tenure at UNM-Los Alamos. She is the first ever tenured faculty member at UNM-LA. In addition, Massengale was promoted from assistant to associate professor.

    “We are looking to build a more substantial group of tenured faculty at UNM-LA,” Massengale said. “The UNM administration in Albuquerque has made a commitment to this endeavor, which shows their ongoing support for UNM-LA.”

  • The dogs trotted around as if they were  warming up for the task ahead of them. Clancey, a coon hound and Osita, a Bouvier des Flandres, seemed excited as they sniffed the ground and the air. Somewhere in the forest surrounding the Pajarito Mountain Ski Area, people were lost and last Saturday morning, the two dogs, along with three volunteers from Mountain Canine Corps, a nonprofit search and rescue organization, prepared to find them.

  • Los Alamos changed a lot since Kathleen “Kay” Manley first arrived in 1943. She watched the town evolve from a secret place that was hidden from the map to an official county of New Mexico. She saw muddy roads become paved streets and neighborhoods appear.

    But Kay did not passively watch these changes from the sidelines; she helped to nurture the local community in several areas including music.

  • Los Alamos First United Methodist Church’s Vacation Bible School will not be a run-of-the-mill classroom lecture.

    Rather than sitting at desks, the Bible school is turning learning about Christianity into a game.

    In fact, the theme for the Vacation Bible School is Studio Go Theme Show.

    Camille Westcott, organizer for the Vacation Bible School, explained each day the program will start and end with a game-show and students will have the opportunity to compete in the game and win prizes.