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Features

  • Christopher Columbus was also known as Cristobal Colon and as Cristoforo Columbo.

    I want to tell you something that is not taught in public schools. Nor is this taught even in most Christian schools.

    (By the way, did you know that the Santa Maria at 97 feet long was only 27 feet longer than a Peterbilt tractor-trailer rig?)

  • At Mountain Elementary School, students selling popcorn cans, wrapping paper and candy were pushed aside in favor of another fundraising effort.

    Rather than trekking miles around neighborhoods selling novelties door-to-door, Mountain Elementary students will walk around the track at Sullivan Field.

    The fundraiser, called “FUN”d Run, invited students to send out sponsor letters to family members and friends, asking them to sponsor them as they walk around the track, Robbie Harris, Parent Teacher Association president, said.

  • As a middle school student, P.E. was never a real highlight and at lunchtime I was always hopeful that my friends would share their cartons of fries. Looking back at this period of time, I wonder what in the world I was thinking.

    Luckily for today’s fifth grade students from the Los Alamos Public Schools, the Los Alamos Cooperative Extension office is helping them brush away bad health habits.

    On Sept. 29, the extension office hosted Just Be It! Healthy and Fit at the First Baptist Church.

  • The workplace can be more than the cubicle you sit at for eight hours a day.

    It can mean more than the coffee pot that burns coffee or the ‘to-do’ basket that never empties.

    Co-workers  can become a second family.

    They rejoice for your successes and when trouble arrives, these non-blood family members have your back.

    For instance, when Los Alamos National Bank employee Bianca Archuleta’s son, Alejandro, 4, was diagnosed with Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia, her co-workers sprang into action.

  • This week we look at Asset #24, Bonding to School and Assets #25, Reading for Pleasure. According to the Search Institute, “Youth are more likely to grow up healthy when the young person cares about his or her school.”

    Your child’s relationship to the school may be directly affected by your relationship with the school. While you may have some frustrations, try not to vent them in front of your child.

    If you constantly seem annoyed by something, you may be adding to their anxiety about school on a daily basis.

  • On Wednesday, expect to see more cars in driveways. School buses may be emptier and the sidewalks should be crowded with students and school staff.

    More than 60 schools throughout the state are participating in Walk and Roll to School Day on Wednesday.

    Among those schools will be Aspen Elementary School and Piñon Elementary School.

    These two institutions are encouraging students to forgo vehicular transportation and walk, ride a bike, push a scooter or roller skate to school.

  • The original intent to have a concert featuring Christian singer Steve Green was to celebrate the opening of the new Crossroads Bible Church building. This intent, however, received a slight revision.

    The building is not ready for its opening day, but that doesn’t sour the celebratory mood. The show must go on.

    Green will perform at 7:30 p.m. Oct. 9 at White Rock Baptist Church. Green is an award-winning performer.

    He has received four Grammy nominations and seven Dove Awards, which is Christian music’s highest award.

  • India may be half around the world, but the influence of its culture reaches across oceans. Its presence can even be felt in the middle of the American West. The Los Alamos Family YMCA Kathak and Bharathatyan dance classes will host a dance recital from 4-6 p.m. Oct. 11 at the Duane Smith Auditorium.

    Students will showcase traditional Kathak, a Northern Indian dance and Bharathatyan, a Southern Indian dance.

  • Los Alamos Piecemakers Guild unveiled bed quilts, wall hangings and lap quilts at the quilt show, which opened Friday and continued through Saturday at the First Baptist Church. In addition to a wide variety of colorful quilts, there were demonstrations, fabric and other supplies for sale and a raffle for the guild’s donation quilt, “Stars of Enchantment.”

  • In October, Mesa Public Library will present “Museum Conservation: The Delicate Art Behind the Scenes,” an exhibit of photographs by New Mexico Highlands University Media Arts student Rachel Montoya.

    The exhibit focuses on the art and science of repairing and preserving museum collection objects performed by the Museum of New Mexico Conservation Department.

  • Temperatures will rise at 8 p.m. Thursday after the LAHS volleyball game as the annual bonfire activities get underway at Sullivan Field.

    Keanna Cohen and the Los Alamos Youth Leadership SPK team have met for weeks to get ready for the bonfire and hope community youth will turn out for the event.

    “Homecoming week is the most extravagant week of the year and it’s important for students to feel included and support our football team,” Cohen said.

  • Years ago, June Warren created festive holiday decorations for  a Santa Fe Opera Guild fundraiser.  “I just made these for the opera guild … and they really sold,” she said.

    Recently, Warren was looking through boxes and discovered a few leftover decorations. Looking at the smiling scarecrows and the silk fall colored leaves, Warren came up with an idea.

    So she whipped out her glue gun and made some more decorative pieces for Halloween.

  • It used to just be me and Zooker.

    Well before I graduated college, married, divorced and remarried. Before I took a single ballet lesson. Before I began writing for newspapers. Before everything happened, I had Zooker. Before that, I was a waitress.

    I was a terrible waitress. My tips didn’t fold; they jangled. I spent too long talking about books with the customers I liked and not enough time remembering who needed a refill on his iced tea.

  • It is the first time the new owners of Sage Cottage signed up for Smith’s Food and Drug Earn and Learn program, and it ended up being a very rewarding decision.  

    The Montessori School received $359.08. “It was nice,” said Cheri Post, executive director of Sage Cottage. “It was a nice chunk of money. Every little bit helps.”

    Post said this year’s money will go toward the school’s general operation fund.

  • Whether you prefer moussaka, deep-fried vegetables or midnight eggs, you can soon find your fix at – where else – the library.  

    This season’s Free Film Series, geared entirely for the gourmand, the glutton and the secret gorger. Each of this winter’s half-dozen films offers not only a good story, memorable dialogue, high drama and/or wild comedy, but also something tasty, tangy, sweet and luscious.

    And best of all, celluloid is virtually calorie-free.

    The cinematic six-course meal begins with not an appetizer, but a wedding.

  • To celebrate the authors of Los Alamos, Otowi Station Bookstore and Science Museum Shop announces the inaugural Los Alamos AuthorFest from 4-7:30 p.m. Friday at Otowi Station. Local authors will sign their books and discuss their work with readers.

    Authors of children’s books will sign books after school from 4-5:30 p.m., and authors of books for young adults and adults will sign them from 5:30-7 p.m.

    Nancy Bartlit

    With a history degree from Smith College, Nancy Bartlit taught young Japanese women and scientists in Japan.

  • The White Rock Baptist Church has always been a little different. “We hold to the central tenets of the Christian faith,” Rev. Chuck McCullough said, “but we have never been real traditional ‘Baptist.’ We have been on this spot, in this town, since 1969, for reasons that transcend denomination and tradition.”  

    Forty years later this church that resists the typical cookie cutter image is still going strong.

    This consistent, long-term presence calls for a celebration.

  • Local pianist Frances Meier included many well-known composers in her program for the upcoming Brown Bag concert, which will be held at 12:30 p.m. Oct. 7 at Fuller Lodge. Rachmaninoff, Chopin and Debussy may be familiar to many members of the audience and some may even know Mompoa and Philip Aaberg.

    In addition to these big-named composers, Meier has included a composer who resides a little closer to home. Herself.

  • What’s black and white and bright all over? During the upcoming quilt show individuals from the Los Alamos Piecemakers Guild will present their answers to this question.

    The quilt show, which will be held from 10 a.m.-7 p.m. Oct. 2 and from 10 a.m.-4 p.m. Oct. 3 at the First Baptist Church, will display hundreds of quilts including bed quilts, lap/nap quilts, wall hangings and wearable art. Additionally, there will be quilts from the national Hoffman Challenge and the Art Quilt 60’s Challenge in celebration of the county’s 60th anniversary.

  • Everyone has a story to tell. Some are stories that enraptures listeners and encourages people to recommend that it be made into a book. Author and journalist Steven Kotler of Chimayo could fill a library with such stories.

    He already has two of them two published, one titled “West of Jesus: Surfing, Science and the Origins of Belief” and “The Angle Quickest for Flight.” Another is slated to be released next year, titled “A Small, Furry Prayer: Dog Rescue, Animal Altruism and the Meaning of Life.”