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Features

  • I love movies about spies. Espionage films are wonderful because the spies use their brains rather than their muscles to combat their enemies. I also admire all the elaborate disguises and fancy techno-gadets that are used to outwit the bad guys in these movies.

    So I looked forward to watching “Duplicity” because it contains my favorite kind of heroes.

    It didn’t disappoint. The movie’s IQ soars to the top of the charts with its witty script and clever plot twists.

  • The spotlight is loving the Aspen Santa Fe Ballet. The company is dancing into the forefront of the ballet world with its upcoming performance.

    Each of the ballets offers something special for the audience. Famous choreographer Twlya Tharp choreographed the piece, “Sue’s Leg,” which launched her career.

    Jennica Lundin, director of marketing at the ballet company, said no other company is currently performing the piece and Tharp hand-selected the Aspen Santa Fe Ballet to dance her ballet.

  • It’s absurd how I have allowed TV to become my major form of entertainment. It’s the thing I turn to when I don’t know what else to do.

    Sometimes I justify turning the television on by telling myself it provides some noise in my apartment so it won’t be so eerily quiet.

    But in reality, whatever appears on the screen generally suckers me onto the couch to passively observe whatever is on TLC or HGTV.

  • “How shall I begin my story that has no beginning?” Esperanza Quintero says in her opening narration to “Salt of the Earth.” It’s more than a poetic line and it’s far more than just her story.

    It’s as though Esperanza speaks of the human story – the constant struggle of mankind versus itself. Where does such a story begin and more importantly, how can it evolve?

  • During a German Club meeting on March 23, Sponsor Anita Boshier had organized a celebration for her German students who participated in the National German Exams this year.

    Eight students, Emily TenCate, Bethany McBride, Jonathan Robey, Celeste Ranken, Sky Korber, David Li, Hannah Denevers and Rachel Hill received medals and book prizes for being among the top 90th percentile of more than 26,000 students who took the National German Examination administered by the American Association of Teachers of German (AATG) in 2008.

  • Los Alamos Artist Fran Stovall, who has created stain-glass and pastel art since 1993, fell into a slump.  

    A gallery that showed her work closed and she wasn’t doing a lot of art. But on a whim, Stovall decided to apply to be the featured artist in the Art Center at Fuller Lodge’s Portal Gallery.

    Being accepted channeled Stovall in a whole new artistic direction.

    “In fact, it really inspired me to move off in this direction that I’d been thinking about for years,” she said.

  • A taste of Spain, a dash of Bach and a splash of a few barcarolles will be mixed into Los Alamos pianist Juanita Madland’s concert, the Los Alamos Arts Council’s Brown Bag show at 12:30 p.m. Wednesday at Fuller Lodge.

    The community can look forward a relaxed concert that will feature Spanish dances, a Bach suite, a piece by Chopin and barcarolles, or Venetian boat songs.

    Madland said, “Playing for the Brown Bag is a little lighter than a night concert.”

  • Are there priceless items sitting in your closet? Or maybe stacked up on shelves in your attic or stuffed in boxes in the garage? Your home could contain a fortune in antiques, gold, coins or jewelry, and you might not know about it. One way to determine if your stuff is valuable is take it to the Treasure Hunters Road Show.

    The Treasure Hunters Road Show will set up shop Tuesday, Wednesday, Thursday, Friday and Saturday at the Holiday Inn Express in Los Alamos. Hours of operation are  9 a.m.-6 p.m. Tuesday through Friday and 9 a.m.-4 p.m. Saturday. There is no cost.

  • This week we look at Asset #6, Parent Involvement in Schooling. According to the Search Institute, “Youth are more likely to grow up healthy when their parents are involved in their education.”

    Last Thursday night, I attended a school board meeting and work session. Luckily, I landed there when the school principals attended with parents who were representing advisory councils.

  • The Easter season inspires a lot of artistic creativity and Los Alamos First United Methodist Church interim choir director James Beinke will unveil April 5 what this holiday influenced him to produce.

    On Palm Sunday, an original Easter Cantata will be performed at 11 a.m.

    Beinke explained the church offers two types of services – a contemporary worship and a traditional service. During the traditional service, a choir rather than a praise band performs.

    The cantata will be featured during the traditional service, he said.

  • Members of the Española Valley Fiber Arts Center will be invited to show their work at the Art Center at Fuller Lodge from March 27-May 2. The exhibit, called “Crossing: Fiber Color Culture,” features unique woven and quilted wall hangings, rugs and wearable art. The exhibit opens with a reception from 5-7 p.m. Friday.

  • In its production of “One Flew Over the Cuckoo’s Nest,” Los Alamos Little Theatre reached high and aimed big and the local theater company should be proud of the results.

    The cast and crew effectively wove drama, tragedy, laughter and hope into this production.

    “One Flew Over the Cuckoo’s Nest,” a play by Dale Wasserman, which is based on Ken Kesey’s novel, takes place in a mental hospital. When a new patient arrives at the institution, the established order and control in the hospital is questioned and challenged.

  • Impressionist paintings have certain characteristics that set them apart: open composition, visible brush strokes and an emphasis on light in its changing qualities. Finding a different type of art in northern New Mexico is sometimes a far stretch, given that culture often influences artists but Española artist Tony Trujillo knows what impressionism is. His paintings meld beautiful landscapes of azure, violet and emerald and leave the observer longing for a far-off world of tranquility.

  • Writers are a great breed of artists. Not only do they create something that can become immortal, but writers can inspire many other forms of art.

    When I attended the Colorado Press Association’s awards conference a few years ago in Denver, I remember one of the speakers who mentioned Mark Bowden. Bowden wrote a newspaper article about soldiers who had gone to Somalia. Not only did his article lead to a book, but it also inspired a movie and, marvels upon marvels, a video game.

    This is just one example of the power the written word has on the art world.

  • David Gonzales has studied with some of the guitar greats.

    Now he shares his knowledge with the next generation of guitar musicians as an intern at Albuquerque Academy.  

    Gonzales is also taking his skills as a guitarist to the stage. Thursday, he will be the next performer in the Guitar and Gateaux concert series. The show kicks off with dessert at 7 p.m. followed by music at 7:30 p.m. at Fuller Lodge.

    The program for the concert will include music by Mauro Giuliani, Manuel Ponces, Manuel de Falla, Francis Pouleno and Albert Ruosel.

  • Los Alamos alumni always come back to show how they’ve turned out and this week, Aspen Elementary School graduate Richard C. Korzekwa will do just that.

    Korzekwa is here at the request of friend and fellow teacher Brittney Newman. With the help of the Bradbury Science Museum, he is visiting Aspen Elementary School, the Jemez Pueblo and Chamisa Elementary School in the Physics Van.

  •  “In its blindness, war destroys the lives of civilians and soldiers alike,” writes Jorg Jansen, author of “And New Life Blossoms from the Ruins.” Jansen will sign his memoir about his childhood growing up in World War II Germany, at 6 p.m. Thursday at Otowi Station Bookstore and Science Museum Shop. Before the signing, he will share  his childhood memories in a talk at 5 p.m. at the Bradbury Science Museum.

  • It is a 12-year-old script but the story never gets old.

    From 6:30-8:30 p.m. April 11, the Santa Fe Stake of the Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints Church will present a timeless story in the form of a pageant titled, “Christ’s Passage to Resurrection” at the Los Alamos ward.

    Brent and Marcia Boyack of Los Alamos wrote the script, which is based on the King James’ version of the New Testament.

    “We wanted to provide a special Easter experience for members of our church,” Brent said.

  • Mental institutions do not seem to be popular locations for inspiring hope, especially not the one featured in “One Flew Over the Cuckoo’s Nest.” Medication, group therapy and alienation from the outside world are emphasized in the fictional institution. There is not much room for anything else so the patients become prisoners in a hopeless situation. That is, until a newcomer is admitted.

  • Today, we are quite excited to scratch our armpits and other body parts in front of Ed Bonelli, who is visiting from a different folder in the computer we live in when we’re not in the newspaper.

    Ed is a character in a new, unpublished play. He doesn’t do much in the play, other than occupy a living room, and as far as we can tell, he doesn’t do anything outside of it. However, we like his company, if only because we’re sick of each others’, and we like pestering him with questions.

    Monkeys: Ed, why don’t you tell us about the play?