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Features

  • Pianist Anna Fedorova has played music all over the globe and  is now sharing her music with Los Alamos. Fedorova will perform a concert, which is a first in a series of Masterpianist recitals, at 6 p.m. Sunday at Fuller Lodge.

    She will perform works by Chopin, Brahms and Mussorgsky. As a special treat, the final performance will be a piano duet between Fedorova and Los Alamos High School graduate Rodion Efremov. They will perform Brahms’ “Two Hungarian Dances.”  

    Efremov describes the program as solo piano romantic works.

  • If you haven’t seen aj Melnick’s exhibit, “New Mexico Women Making a Difference,” at the Los Alamos Historical Museum, there is no need to panic that the opportunity has slipped through your fingers.

    The museum is extending the exhibit through the end of July, with  a possibility that it will remain at the historical building through the end of August.

    “I think it’s a very attractive show that appeals to a wide spectrum of people,” Hedy Dunn, director of the museum, said.

  • A pageant can be a dirty business. Sometimes contestants sabotage each other in a war for a glittery crown. But the Mrs. New Mexico competition was different. How is that known locally? Because Los Alamos had one of its own in the pageant.

    Bernadette Lauritzen put on the sash, the pretty evening dress and even braved wearing a swimsuit to help promote the townsite’s 60th anniversary, which was held Saturday at the Roy E. Disney Center in Albuquerque.

    “It was a really good experience,” Lauritzen said.

  • Ricko Donovan has lived in Madrid, Spain and traveled throughout Ireland but despite these faraway destinations, it is a local venue that he is looking forward to performing in.

    Donovan will complete this year’s Los Alamos Arts Council’s Guitars and Gateaux series, which will start at 7 p.m. Thursday at Fuller Lodge.

    Donovan concluded the series last year as well and he said he is eager to return to Fuller Lodge.

    “I really love the lodge,” he said.

  • For the 2009-2010 concert season, the Los Alamos Concert Association presents a Musical Stimulus package, consisting of a season of acclaimed artists, and including reduced prices on pairs of tickets and an extended early-purchase deadline.  

    The Musical Stimulus package is designed to encourage everyone who loves music to come, relax and enjoy the concerts.

    The 2009-2010 season opens on Sept. 26, with a performance by TAGI, the clarinet, violin, cello and piano quartet.  

  • Dr. Gordy Klatt had seen many cancer patients when he decided to assist them in other ways besides as a physician. Klatt resolved to run on a track for 24 hours and for a donation, his friends could join him. With this decision, the Relay for Life was born. In its first year, the relay generated $25,000 for the American Cancer Society. In its second year, teams were formed and $33,000 was raised.

    Now, 25 years later, the event has grown to practically every state in the U.S. and raised around $3 billion for the Cancer Society.

  • James Doss had a vision for his book but the story quickly assumed control.

    Doss said he wanted the story to be set in Colorado but did not intend for it to be focused on Native Americans. The book, however, had other ideas.

    Thirteen books later, the fictional Colorado town still exists but Charlie Moon and his aunt Daisy have taken things over.

    The Moon mysteries are set on a Ute Indian reservation and features Moon, a police detective, his aunt Daisy Perika, a Native American shaman and Scott Paris, another detective on the force.

  • This week we take a look at Asset #15, High Expectations. According to the Search Institute, youth are more likely to grow up healthy when their parents have high expectations.

    This Asset scares me a bit because sometimes we can become so data driven that we can’t see a good result as a result of being too focused on the number.

    There are so many things that create a successful life that we need to be mindful of all the potential held by each and every child.

  • The House of Hope (HOH) Women, the all-women construction team from many of the local Los Alamos/White Rock churches, will again spend their Columbus Day weekend committing their time and talents building another house in Juárez, Mexico.  

    In order to support the 2009 project, the group is making preparations to serve a Frito pie dinner at the annual Vacation Bible School evening family dinner to be held from 5:30-7 p.m. Thursday in Kelly Hall, the new parish hall at Trinity on the Hill Episcopal Church on Trinity Drive.  

  • She’s looking at me with her old-man eyebrows right now. Her pink-and-black dotted foot lies against her gray-and-black mini-jowl. She’s almost asleep. Her humongous ears twitch every so often, when Joss Stone hits especially soulful notes on the stereo and any time Zooker moves.

    Zooker, my 11-year-old Chow Chow mix, has a new, horrifying 15-pound companion. It’s not a tumor. It’s so much worse: a puppy.

  • Graduates of the Los Alamos Youth Leadership class of 2009 recently celebrated their accomplishments of the year, with a congratulatory dinner sponsored by Los Alamos National Bank.

    The theme for 2009, like many other recent events, tied into the Los Alamos celebration of the 60th anniversary.

    The guest speakers for the event were Mary Jean Nilsson and Jay Wechsler. Nilsson and Weschler both arrived in the early days and have seen a lot of change throughout the years.

  • Thomas Mapfumo was born in a country ruled by a dictator who many consider the worst tyrant in the world.

    He grew up in a society where the average life expectancy ends in the mid-30s  age range and where the economy is practically extinct, rapes are frequent and people are oppressed into silence.

    But  that silence is breaking. Mapfumo, along with the Blacks Unlimited, are giving the people of Zimbabwe, his home country, a voice.

  • With a picnic table at Ashley Pond ladled with food, the Los Alamos High School band parents and students celebrated Zane Meek stepping into the position of the school’s band director Tuesday.

    Meek replaces Dr. Charles Faulkner, who retired this year.

    Before acting as the band’s director, Meek was a graduate student at University of New Mexico in Albuquerque.

    He said he was attracted to Los Alamos because “I heard that the students and parents are very dedicated to the music program.”

  • This summer Los Alamos celebrates its 60th Anniversary and The Art Center at Fuller Lodge is getting ready to start things off with a bang.  The Art Center’s newest exhibition, “Los Alamos Yesterday and Today” opens Friday and runs through July 25.  The exhibit encompasses both the surrounding landscape and cultures integral to Los Alamos and celebrates the unique essence of Los Alamos itself.

  • The sale tables for the Sombrillo Summer Bazaar are loaded with treasures of every kind. The bazaar takes place from 9 a.m.-1 p.m. Saturday at the nursing and rehabilitation center, located at 1011 Sombrillo Court. Shoppers will find appliances, home and office furniture, toys, exercise and sport equipment, clothing and decorations. There will also be a bake sale.

    Additionally, Patti Cake the Clown will entertain children with face painting and games and the Scottish Dancers will perform. This is a gala family event that can be enjoyed by all ages.

  • Spring is creeping into the Demonstration Garden and the NMSU Master Gardeners are busy. The unusual rainfall has benefited the emerging plants and made the ground easier to work. Last year’s newest plot, the Oasis garden, is in bloom and this year’s new Perennial Herb bed is taking shape.

    The Oasis garden was begun as a demonstration of what can be done in an area that can receive extra water.

  • The Los Alamos County Library System’s summer reading program kicks off with theatrical flair.

    On Monday, members of Wise Fool Puppets will bring their performances and knowledge of puppetry to Mesa Public Library and White Rock Branch Library.

    The show begins at 4 p.m. in White Rock and at 7 p.m. at Mesa Public Library.

    Amy Christian, co-artistic director of Wise Fool, said they will talk about how the puppets are created, allow children to climb into their life-size puppets and perform little skits throughout the program.

  • David Thurston, a biology and geology teacher at Los Alamos High School, was diagnosed with acute myelogenous leukemia (AML) at the end of the school year.

    While Thurston is undergoing treatment at the University of New Mexico Hospital in Albuquerque, high school students have been busy finding ways to support him. He will soon be heading out to California for a bone marrow transplant.

  • This week we take a look at Asset #15, Positive Peer lnfluence. According to the Search-Institute, “Youth are more likely to grow up healthy when their best friends model responsible behavior.”

    While you can’t choose your child’s friends, you can have a big impact on their friendships. From the time our kids were tiny, my friend Karen and I knew we wanted to have the “hangout house.”

    You know the house you see on the Tyson food commercials when the kids come home from school with friends and want to eat you out of house and home.

  • When Miriam and Rolland Perry arrived in Los Alamos with their young family in the spring of 1943, the Perrys found no other members of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints.  

    Sixty years later, this has all changed.

    They worked with people of other faiths to organize a community Sunday School, which later became the United Church, where they became active.