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Features

  • Love is a subject that the Los Alamos Little Theater has tackled in the past. A woman falls in love with Van Gogh in “Starry Night;” a personal ad brings a woman from Maine to the plains of Kansas to get married in “Sarah, Plain and Tall;” a Shakespeare festival brings romance to two strangers in “Time Enough.”  

    The community theater has shown love is all sorts of situations, but in its latest play, “Fool for Love,” the subject is taken to a whole different level.

  • Los Alamos High School students Emma Carroll, Kathy Lin, Jamie Resnick, Shaina Riciputi, Dov Shlachter and Kendra Smale are a part of a nationwide group of students who share an impressive accomplishment.

    Carroll, Lin, Resnick, Riciputi, Shlachter and Smale are among the 16,000 semifinalists in the 55th annual National Merit Scholarship Program.

    To be a semifinalist means they are able to continue to compete for approximately 8,200 National Merit Scholarships that are worth more than $36 million that will be offered next spring.

  • When it comes to art, there is no age requirement. Individuals do not need to be an adult to explore their creativity. Therefore, for its fall 2009 classes and workshops, the Art Center at Fuller Lodge is opening its doors to the younger generation of artists.

    These classes for elementary through middle school students include Alternative Perceptions, Clay: Fun, Form and Function, Drawing of the Animal World, Portraits of Self and Others and Tie Dye.

  • In one image, the sunlight glares off the side of a Coke bottle, creating a blinding oblong star over the famous red label. In another, a narrow river suddenly plummets into an avalanche of white rapids. Both objects look completely believable, solid and without-a-doubt three-dimensional.

    Never mind that the bottle is 5-feet tall, or that instead rushing down the side of the side of a mountain, the river and its attendant waterfall crash down the paved un-magnificent,  flat sidewalk.

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  • On Sept. 18, the two-day Jewish holiday of Rosh Hashanah begins. Rosh Hashanah is Hebrew for “head of the year” and this day begins the Jewish year 5770.

    The holiday celebrates the creation of mankind and features festive meals and New Year good wishes. It also begins a 10-day period of personal reassessment and atonement.

  • The opportunity to perform in the White Rock’s 60th anniversary party is an invitation the local band, The Laminators, are happy to accept.

    The band, which includes Mark Clay on drums, Louie Jalbert on lead guitar, Dave Martin on rhythm guitar and Bob Manzanares on bass guitar, will perform a medley of music at 5 p.m. Sunday in White Rock’s Rover Park.

    Jalbert said the band performs 50s, 60s classic jazz, swing, rock n’ roll, country and occasionally throw in one or two variations on a standard.

  • When I was about 8 years old, I got it into my head that I would run away from home. At that particular time my family and I were living in a neighborhood in Knoxville, Tenn., that still had vacant lots and new construction. I imagined myself taking shelter in the wooden skeleton of one of those new houses.

    I read books about runaways including “My Side of the Mountain” and I figured if those young children could make a successful go of it then I could, too. However, I failed miserably. I didn’t even make it out the door.

  • Even if you haven’t looked at a still life in recent memory, it’s time to consider this art form again at the exhibition “Still Life Revisited.”

    The Art Center at Fuller Lodge will host an opening reception from 5-7 p.m. Friday and the public is invited to come and meet many of the artists who have offered their interpretations of the theme.

  • Los Alamos has always nurtured the arts and on Friday, its artistry will be in full bloom. Village Arts, Mesa Public Library, Los Alamos Historical Museum and the Art Center at Fuller Lodge will all be bursting with color, creativity and innovation during the Arts Crawl from 4-8 p.m.

    The timing for this event is perfect since Los Alamos has designated September as Arts and Culture Month.

  • The Los Alamos Public Schools Foundation is accepting donations of gently used wind instruments for use by students in the LAPS music programs grades five through 12.

     It is important that the instruments be in working order.

    Instruments requiring minor repair will also be accepted because the foundation does have the means to repair them.

    Donations can be dropped off at the Los Alamos Public Schools district office, 751 Trinity Drive, between 8:30 a.m. and 4:30 p.m. through Friday as well as Sept. 14-18.

  • Sam Shepard’s play “Fool for Love” kicks off the Los Alamos Little Theatre’s 2009-2010 theatrical season, which has been dedicated to the loving memory of John Mench, a founding member of LALT who passed away recently.

    LALT veteran Corey New directs “Fool for Love,” while former LALT president Jennifer Wadsack produces it.  

    Although “Fool for Love” is set contemporarily on the edge of the Mojave Desert, it plays more like a Greek tragedy come to life out of hazy remnants from the Wild West.  

  • The room that is solely my grandmother’s domain is the kitchen. Her cookbooks fill the counters while photos of family and friends are taped up on the wall by the kitchen sink. Even though she is not cooking anymore, you can still see her puttering around this room.

    Since my grandmother’s big love was cooking it really isn’t any surprise the person she adored was Julia Child. My mother told me she even got to meet Child at a department store. The famous writer and cook performed a cooking demonstration and signed copies of her book.

  • Los Alamos’ history is well known. It is printed in the history books and mentioned in movies. But what about that ‘burb’ known as White Rock further down the Hill? What’s its story?

    A talk, “The History of White Rock,” which will be held at 7:30 p.m. Tuesday at White Rock Baptist Church, will answer many questions people might have about the area.

  • Monday marks the end of the summer and for a nearby Orthodox Monastery, the celebration of its annual feast day, the Feast of the Archangel Michael.  Each year this annual pilgrimage draws visitors from throughout New Mexico and Southern Colorado.  

    Members and the priest of Saint Dimitri Orthodox Church will join in the annual event with Rev. John Hennies, who serve as the priest at the Divine Liturgy, which will begin at 10 a.m. at the monastery church.  

  • Los Alamos loves its dogs. Their faces are seen on computer desktops, their photos are preserved in glass frames and their images are printed on calendars.

    You can see them and their owners trotting down Los Alamos’ sidewalks or zooming around one of the townsite’s dog parks.

  • The word “local” carries with it a kind of stigma.

    One on hand, we feel like we should buy local and support our immediate community.

    On the other hand, we tend to act as though products made and sold far away are actually better – as though we’re doing the locals a huge favor with our generosity.

    But we’ve got it backward. Los Alamos contains a lot of smart people, and many of these people don’t work at the lab.

  • Community Education students at UNM-Los Alamos built an electronic vehicle in just one month this summer.

    Instructor Michael Ham and his classes produced a working prototype of TWEAK (Three-Wheeled Electric Alternative by KinAesthetic Wind).

    “The idea was to build a small commuter vehicle that would be inexpensive — similar to a motorcycle but safer,” Ham said.