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Features

  • Thirty students made a commitment to leadership and to serve community.

    To cement this commitment, the Los Alamos Youth Leadership students are working on a variety of fundraising and service activities.  

    The teams are driven by the youth who coordinate everything from meetings and projects to team names and outcomes.

    Each team has its own unique name. For instance, there is the SPK team, or the Sour Patch Kids.

    This name was selected because sometimes the team members are sweet and sometimes they’re sour.

  • At first glance, it may seem like they are just the ones who drive the county transit buses, send out the utility bills or patrol the streets. On Saturday, however, the Los Alamos County employees are going to show a side of themselves not often seen in public.

    The Los Alamos County Employee Arts and Crafts Fair will be held from 9 a.m.-3 p.m. at Fuller Lodge. During this fair, 28 vendors, which will include county employees, their spouses and friends, will unleash their artistic side.

  • The first major construction project I participated in was building the fence around my family’s yard in Littleton, Colo.

    I was just a kid, but my father let me help him secure the support post before a construction company arrived to put up the actual fencing.

    I loved the whole experience; I loved watching the bead swish back and forth on the level, which was used to make sure the posts were straight.

    My father showed me how to use a hammer to nail in the posts and together we created a wooden grid of vertical and horizontal lines around the yard.

  • There’s no need to travel far to do holiday shopping. Just head down the street to the   Beta Sigma Phi Xi Nu chapter’s Fall Arts and Crafts Fair from 9 a.m.-3 p.m. Saturday at First Baptist Church.

    More than 30 vendors will be featured during the fair.

    For years, this fundraising event was located at the Pueblo Complex. The space at the Baptist Church is a large, open and well-lit space. Additionally it offers a kitchen.

    The products that will be for sale range from handmade cards and crafts to jerky and fabric items.

  • Art is more than a painting to hang on the wall or a song to listen to on the radio. It can be a tool to change someone’s life.

    A nonprofit organization based in New York, called Unified for Global Healing, puts this belief into practice. The organization, according to its Web site, has a network of physicians, nurses, social workers and artists who work together to provide a direct service, cross-cultural exchange and promote the advancement of global health.

  • Joshua Ronald Dolin was recently honored as Rotary Student of the Month for October.

    Josh is the son of Ron Dolin and Beth Lee.

    The Rotary Club of Los Alamos selects one outstanding student from the current Los Alamos High School graduating class to honor each month of the school year.

    Students are selected on the basis of their academics, extracurricular activities and their service to the community record.

  • Is life sweet? Yes, it is, according to Mike Leigh, the director of the award winning 1991 British film, “Life is Sweet.”  

    This film is not about the genteel Britain of “Upstairs, Downstairs” or Jane Austen, but is a raw, edgy and darkly comedic film about a working class family in contemporary London suburbia.  

  • Sherlock Holmes first appeared in print in 1887. The character’s tremendous popularity led to the publication of four novels and 56 short stories. In December 1893, Arthur Conan Doyle and William Gillette wrote “The Final Problem,” the story in which they killed off the world’s most famous detective, in a fight to the death with his archnemesis, the evil genius Dr. Moriarty. Holmes devotees around the world protested, wore black armbands and begged the author to resurrect their hero. Doyle finally revived Holmes in 1903.

  • This week we take a look at Asset #32, planning and Asset #33, decision making. Earlier this week, I had a call from a parent who had me change my focus for this week.

    I would like to focus on kids who have poor decision-making skills or don’t plan and how we as adults relate to them.

    As adults, we need to help kids take responsibility for their actions, without going down one of two bad paths.

  • The live theatrical one-man drama, “Vianney,” performed by Leonardo Defilippis, will be presented at 7 p.m. Tuesday at Immaculate Heart of Mary Church in Los Alamos.

    The Los Alamos performance will be the third stop in the New Mexico tour of this acclaimed production of the life of St. John Vianney. Other performances will take place at St. Anne’s Church in Santa Fe today, St. Thomas Aquinas Church in Rio Rancho Sunday,

  • If you have ever wondered what really goes on during a dance class or, for that matter, a performance rehearsal, you will soon have an opportunity to satisfy your curiosity. At 5 p.m. Thursday, Dance Arts Los Alamos will host an open rehearsal for its upcoming production of “The Nutcracker.” The rehearsal will be held at the dance studio in the downstairs parish hall of Trinity on the Hill Episcopal Church and the public is invited to attend.

  • Doris Jackson, artist gallery manager at the Art Center at Fuller Lodge, had her eye on a particular pedestal for years. John Werenko, executive director of the Art Center, joked she could have it when she decided to end her employment. On Wednesday she got her  pedestal.

    A recognition party was held Wednesday afternoon at Fuller Lodge to say farewell to Jackson who is leaving her work at the Art Center.

    Jackson started as the artist gallery manager at the Art Center in 2001 but her work with the organization extended well before that.

  • A kaleidoscope of art mediums will be spread throughout the Mesa Public Library’s gallery starting Tuesday.

    The exhibit titled, “All Mixed Up,” will showcase photography, quilting, sculpture and watercolors. The artists behind this artwork are Darlene Bawden, Arleeta Bawden, Cyndy Carter and Garth Tietjen.

    Tietjen said having a range of media should enhance the show.

  • The Los Alamos Lads of Enchantment (LOE) will hold its 18th Annual Barbershop Show on Friday and Saturday at the White Rock Baptist Church.  The show, “Love, Wonderful Love,” will feature the Lads of Enchantment and McPhly, the 2008 Barbershop Harmony Society Rocky Mountain District (RMD) Quartet Champion.

  • Los Alamos resident Robin Priestley has launched her pet sitting service just in time for the busy holiday travel season.

    Now an empty nester, Priestley turned her lifelong love of animals into a vocation. Her friend, Sylvia Hush, who has made quite a success of her own pet sitting business, inspired her.

  • An uncarved pumpkin is just a blank, seed-filled canvas. Each year, the community looks forward to seeing pumpkins transformed, some into classic Jack-o-lanterns with triangle eyes and toothy grins, others into something else – intricately carved portraits of witches speeding by on their brooms or of characters from the Simpsons.  

    One of the best parts of Halloween is seeing all the best work lit up in a long eerie line, a sort of pumpkin masquerade.

  • Alyx Jones, a member of Scout Varsity Team 222, received his Eagle Bronze Palm at a Court of Honor held Oct. 17.  

    This award required additional Merit Badges and service time beyond his Eagle Award. Scouting began for Jones in 2004 after having earned the “Arrow of Light” – the highest Cub Scouting award. Within a year he rose to the rank of First Class and soon received the “On My Honor” religious recognition.   

  • When I’m old, I’m going to have sagging, misshapen, ugly tattoos.

    People love to remind me of this.  A miserable buffalo, a rotten pear, a little king whose beautiful ermine coat needs ironing.

    Typically, it’s someone who doesn’t know me well and with whom I’ve never shared any philosophy about aging, death or even body art, who tells me this.

    Although I was only 18 years old when I got my first tattoo, I realized that eventually I would get old.

  • Jonathan Dowell’s head bobs as he begins to play the Mountain Dulcimer. His fingers pluck and slide along the dulcimer that is a rich colored wood and decorated with pearlescent designs. From these hand movements a sweet sound dances out from the instruments’ three strings.

    Dowell has been playing the Mountain Dulcimer for 15 years and has played many dulcimers but this particular one is different.

  • Hobbies can be fun and relaxing, but they also at times can be expensive and not earth-friendly.

    Join Katy Korkos and Terry Foxx at Pajarito Environmental Education Center for a three-part workshop focusing on the ins and outs of crafting using recycled and otherwise environmentally friendly materials.

    This class is designed to encourage imagination and ingenuity in using up and making do with items around us.