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Features

  • Get a musical morsel of “The Sound of Music” before being served the whole enchilada starting Friday.

    The Los Alamos Arts Council’s Brown Bag show will feature different selections of the musical, performed by the Los Alamos Light Opera,  at 12:30 p.m. Wednesday at Fuller Lodge.

    The songs will include “The Sound of Music,” “(How do you Solve a Problem Like) Maria,” “Do-Re-Mi,” “No Way to Stop It” and “Something Good.”

  • In June, 10 high school students and four chaperones from Immaculate Heart of Mary Catholic Church will travel to Honduras to volunteer at Nuestros Pequeños Hermanos (NPH) orphanage near Tegucigalpa.

    The parish has sponsored mission trips to NPH in Honduras annually for 12 years.  NPH, translated Our Little Brothers and Sisters, is made up of about 500 kids, up to age 18, and their adopted “abuelos” who are brought into an environment of unconditional acceptance, sharing and work.  

  • For nearly 25 years here in Los Alamos, the annual journey of Christians through the season of Lent has been shared across denominational lines. Ecumenical Lenten Wednesdays will be hosted this year in the new Parish Hall at Trinity on the Hill Episcopal Church on Wednesday, and March 11, 18, 25 and April 1, beginning at 6 p.m. The public is welcome.

  • Leonardo Defilippis is an actor with a mission. For 28 years, he’s been bringing the saints and the scriptures to life with dramatic productions on the stage and screen. He is perhaps best known as the director of the feature film “Thérése,” which ran for more than a year in mainstream movie theaters.

    On Sunday, he will perform at Immaculate Heart of Mary Parish at 5p.m. for a limited engagement of his one-man production of “The Gospel According to John.”

  • Duane Smith Auditorium is killing two birds with one stone. At 7 p.m. Friday, a pie auction will be held to kick off a fundraising drive for new seats in the auditorium. While the pies are being sold, a number of community organizations including New Mexico Dance Theatre, Dance Arts Los Alamos, Los Alamos High School Jazz Band, LAHS Olions Thespian Club, the Family YMCA, UNM-LA dance classes, Los Alamos Light Opera and many others will take the stage for a variety show, which will showcase 60 years of performance arts in Los Alamos.

  • Sometimes things would be easier if life imitated the movies.

    When I moved out of my studio apartment last week, I wistfully thought of Carrie Bradshaw’s move in “Sex and the City.” She had moving down right. Plug in the music, pop the champagne and magically everything gets neatly packed and re-moved.

    Reality, as we all know, is far messier. There aren’t enough boxes, packing material or patience to get the job quickly completed.

    Plus, you have to wipe away the evidence that you ever set foot in the old residence.

  • Theater buffs in Los Alamos and throughout New Mexico have been privileged with multiple opportunities to see Los Alamos playwright Robert Benjamin’s work. Now, the privilege is crossing state lines.

    The Arizona Jewish Theater Company commissioned Benjamin to write a play and starting March 14 through March 29, Benjamin’s play, “Parted Waters,” will be performed at the Performing Arts Center at the Paradise Valley Community College in Phoenix, Ariz.

    Benjamin explained the production director really liked his work.

  • It’s the same school, but there’s something different about Sage Montessori School.

    On Jan. 5, the Montessori school, located at Meadow Lane and Rover Boulevard, earned nonprofit status.

    Cheri Host, executive director of the school, explained she and Theresa Cull, safety engineer, had wanted to make Sage Montessori a nonprofit shortly after they purchased the school two-and-a-half years ago.

    Work to become a nonprofit started in July, Host said. They collaborated with an accountant and a lawyer.

  • Science writer Mark Wolverton brings sensitivity, insight and convincing research to “A Life in Twilight: the Final Years of J. Robert Oppenheimer.” Wolverton will speak at the Bradbury Science Museum at 5 p.m. Thursday and will sign copies of “A Life in Twilight” from 6-7:30 p.m. at Otowi Station.

    The book encompasses the last 13 years of J. Robert Oppenheimer’s life.

  • I have discovered a gem in Los Alamos. Tucked between small businesses and houses is the University of New Mexico–Los Alamos. I found a place where the staff and educators work hard to create a unique, welcoming environment

    As a mother of three growing children, I am not your typical college student, or so I thought. I researched my options for college and decided to attend UNM-LA for one major reason, the location. The day before my first class at the university, insecurities began to fill my thoughts.

  • From its breathtaking opening solo to its exquisite grand finale - Susan Baker Dillingham’s creative genius takes the classic “Cinderella” tale to amazing new heights.

  • Like any art found throughout the world, Pueblo art covers a huge spectrum of forms. It is found in Kachina dolls, rock art, murals on kiva walls and pottery. And similar to New York City or Florence, Italy, a meca for Pueblo art is found right here in the Rio Grande Valley.

  • Los Alamos will be opening a new golf course in 2009, but only for a day. The 19th Hole, an indoor, miniature golf fundraiser will be held from 10 a.m.- 2 p.m. Feb. 28  at various local businesses.

    “I’ve wanted to do this event for a number of years,” said Bernadette Lauritzen, Assets In Action coordinator and golf course superintendent for the event. “The event will allow local businesses to showcase their venues while raising funds for a wonderful program.”

  • For almost a century, Bandelier National Monument has been a place of natural and man-made wonders, where visitors walk narrow trails through deep canyons and traverse mesas to marvel at vistas of the Pajarito Plateau or the ruins of abandoned pueblos. For more than 30 years, such experiences have been enhanced by a guidebook written by veteran hiker and historian Dorothy Hoard.

  • Michael Chapdelaine underwent  some major transformations since he first started performing in Los Alamos.

    “I’ve been making some serious transitions in my personal life and they’ve brought out some sorrow, anger, relief and bliss … it’s pretty heavy stuff,” he said.

    These changes have given a whole new meaning to his music. Now, Chapdelaine said, when he writes a song about leaving, it really means something; and now songs about emancipation and optimism really mean something.

  • This week we look at Asset #2, Positive Family Communication. According to the Search Institute, “Youth are more likely to grow up healthy when they and their parents communicate positively and they are willing to seek parent’s advice and counsel.”

  • John and Jean Lyman recently returned from a trip with more than just fond memories of sight-seeing and recreating, they have a clearer understanding of their identity.

    During a three-month trip to Great Britain, the Lymans participated in Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints church services in the London temple and researched their family history throughout England.

  • Baha'is of Los Alamos will hold a prayer gathering at 7 p.m. Saturday at the Unitarian Church, to express concern and support for the seven Baha’i members who have been in prison in Iran for nearly a year and who are now to stand trial on charges of spying for Israel and insulting Islam. The public is invited to attend.

    The Iranian Student News Agency (ISNA) announced on Feb. 11 that charges had been brought against the seven imprisoned members of the national-level committee that coordinates the activities for the Iranian Baha’i community.

  • Saint Dimitri Orthodox Church will host its 11th Annual Blini Breakfast from noon-2:30 p.m. March 1. Russian blini, a type of thin pancake, will be served in the traditional style with smoked salmon, herring, butter and sour cream.  Vegetable caviar, eggs and a variety of berry preserves will be available as well.  

  • Seeing Kathy Lin, a Los Alamos High School junior, by a piano is not an uncommon sight in Los Alamos. Residents have frequently been able to enjoy her performances, whether that performance was a student recital, a Brown Bag show or a Professional Music Teachers New Mexico Honors competition. Lin’s skill as a pianist is one of many musical gifts presented to the community.